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The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

Appellate advocacy

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

A Lecture On Appellate Advocacy, Karl N. Llewellyn Apr 2005

A Lecture On Appellate Advocacy, Karl N. Llewellyn

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


Learning From Professor Llewellyn, D. P. Marshall Jr. Apr 2005

Learning From Professor Llewellyn, D. P. Marshall Jr.

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


Objective Analysis Of Advocacy Preferences And Prevalent Mythologies In One California Appellate Court, Charles A. Bird, Webster Burke Kinnaird Apr 2002

Objective Analysis Of Advocacy Preferences And Prevalent Mythologies In One California Appellate Court, Charles A. Bird, Webster Burke Kinnaird

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

No abstract provided.


Appellate Advocacy As Adult Education, Christine Durham Jan 2000

Appellate Advocacy As Adult Education, Christine Durham

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

Judges must learn enough about every case in order to make competent rulings. An attorney may be a more effective appellate advocate is they think of themselves as teachers to judges.


Rules Of Appellate Advocacy: An Australian Perspective, Michael Kirby Jul 1999

Rules Of Appellate Advocacy: An Australian Perspective, Michael Kirby

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

A justice of Australia's highest court gives advice to appellate advocates. The essay begins with an overview of Australia’s judicial structure. The discussion then focuses on ten rules for appellate advocacy.


From Webster To Word-Processing: The Ascendance Of The Appellate Brief, William H. Rehnquist Jan 1999

From Webster To Word-Processing: The Ascendance Of The Appellate Brief, William H. Rehnquist

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

Chief Justice William Rehnquist analyzed the evolution of Supreme Court advocacy. The discussion begins with the initial preference for oral arguments and the influence of nineteenth century Supreme Court advocate Daniel Webster. The discussion then turns to the Court’s shift from more attention to oral argument to written briefs.