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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Discretion In Making Legal Decisions: A Frances Lewis Law Center Colloquium, Thomas L. Shaffer Jan 1986

Discretion In Making Legal Decisions: A Frances Lewis Law Center Colloquium, Thomas L. Shaffer

Journal Articles

Colloquium papers, pp. 1161-1311, edited by Professor Shaffer.


Levinson Builds The Kingdom: Comment On "Professing Law", Thomas L. Shaffer Jan 1986

Levinson Builds The Kingdom: Comment On "Professing Law", Thomas L. Shaffer

Journal Articles

This Article takes the perspective that the professed law is an idol. As such, it is false worship, which is led by false priests, and is rationalized by false prophets. Professor Shaffer proposes that those who believe in the will of God are presented with two tasks. First, one must tear down this idol, and secondly, one must then build the Kingdom. He focuses his discussion on how one can build the Kingdom, and examines the viability of a Kingdom built upon constitutionalism, citizenship, and community.


Imagining The Past And Remembering The Future: The Supreme Court's History Of The Establishment Clause, Gerard V. Bradley Jan 1986

Imagining The Past And Remembering The Future: The Supreme Court's History Of The Establishment Clause, Gerard V. Bradley

Journal Articles

Our Framers through the Establishment Clause sought to prevent the government from preferring one religious sect to another. However, the Supreme Court in Everson v. Board of Education abandoned that meaning of nonestablishment and created a general prohibition on all nondiscriminatory aid to religion, a decision later reinforced in Lemon v. Kurtzman. This Article discusses the Founder’s worldview and looks at other Establishment Clause cases to illustrate that the historical evidence is inconsistent with Everson. Rather, the founders intended to assure that religion would be aided only on a nondiscriminatory, or sect-neutral, basis and does not stand for the ...


The "Natural Law Tradition", John M. Finnis Jan 1986

The "Natural Law Tradition", John M. Finnis

Journal Articles

This "tradition of natural law theory" has three main features: First, critique and rejection of ethical scepticism, dogmatism and conventionalism; Second, clarification of the methodology of descriptive and explanatory social theories (e.g., political science, economics, jurisprudence .... ); Third, critique and rejection of aggregative conceptions of the right and the just (e.g., consequentialism, utilitarianism, wealth-maximization, "proportionalism"...).