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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

The Alien Tort Statute And The Law Of Nations, Bradford R. Clark, Anthony J. Bellia Jan 2011

The Alien Tort Statute And The Law Of Nations, Bradford R. Clark, Anthony J. Bellia

Journal Articles

Courts and scholars have struggled to identify the original meaning of the Alien Tort Statute (ATS). As enacted in 1789, the ATS provided "[t]hat the district courts...shall...have cognizance...of all causes where an alien sues for tort only in violation of the law of nations or a treaty of the United States." The statute was rarely invoked for almost two centuries. In the 1980s, lower federal courts began reading the statute expansively to allow foreign citizens to sue other foreign citizens for all violations of modern customary international law that occurred outside the United States. In 2004 ...


A Process Theory Of Torts, Jay Tidmarsh Jan 1994

A Process Theory Of Torts, Jay Tidmarsh

Journal Articles

This article is meant to reconcile two schools of intellectual thought regarding tort law, the conceptualist and the anti-conceptualist. It argues that torts must be understood as a system in perpetual process--forever indefinite and infinitely malleable in its precise theoretical, doctrinal and practical manifestations--yet ultimately bounded in its possibilities. It then defines the limits of torts law as a process that constantly regenerates the old face of tort theory, doctrine and practice into the new.


Probability Theory Meets Res Ipsa Loquitor, David H. Kaye Jan 1979

Probability Theory Meets Res Ipsa Loquitor, David H. Kaye

Journal Articles

Day in and day out, attorneys, judges, and jurors must estimate probabilities. To be sure, we rarely quantify such estimates of probability and almost never adopt the terminology and mathematics of probability theory to resolve matters. Nevertheless, the mathematical theory of probability can be applied to legal problems in various ways. This article uses probability theory normatively in an effort to clarify one aspect of the famous tort doctrine known as res ipsa loquitur. While not urging that jurors be instructed in probability theory or be equipped with microprocessors, it does seek an accurate statement of the res ipsa doctrine ...