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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Community Policing In New Haven: Social Norms, Police Culture, And The Alleged Crisis Of Criminal Procedure, Caroline Van Zile May 2011

Community Policing In New Haven: Social Norms, Police Culture, And The Alleged Crisis Of Criminal Procedure, Caroline Van Zile

Student Legal History Papers

Nick Pastore will forever be known as one of New Haven’s most colorful historical figures. The Chief of Police in New Haven from 1990 to 1997, Pastore was well-known for his outrageous comments and unusual antics. New Haven’s chief proponent of community policing, Pastore referred to himself in interviews as “’an outstanding patrol officer,’ a ‘super crime-fighting cop,’ ‘a good cop with the Mafia,’ [and] ‘Sherlock Holmes.’” Pastore, unlike his immediate predecessor, highly valued working with the community and advocated for a focus on reducing crime rather than increasing arrests. Pastore once informed that New York Times that ...


The Xinfang Phenomenon: Why The Chinese Prefer Administrative Petitioning Over Litigation, Taisu Zhang Aug 2008

The Xinfang Phenomenon: Why The Chinese Prefer Administrative Petitioning Over Litigation, Taisu Zhang

Student Scholarship Papers

In recent years, the Chinese public, when facing disputes with government officials, hav preferred a non-legal means of resolution, the Xinfang system, over litigation. Some scholars explain this by claiming that administrative litigation is less effective than Xinfang petitioning. Others argue that the Chinese have historically eschewed litigation and continue to do so habitually. This paper proposes a new explanation: Chinese have traditionally litigated administrative disputes, but only when legal procedure is not too adversarial and allows for the possibility of reconciliation through court-directed settlement. Since this possibility does not formally exist in modern Chinese administrative litigation, people tend to ...


“For The Murder Of His Own Female Slave, A Woman Named Mira...” : Law, Slavery And Incoherence In Antebellum North Carolina, Anthony V. Baker Mar 2006

“For The Murder Of His Own Female Slave, A Woman Named Mira...” : Law, Slavery And Incoherence In Antebellum North Carolina, Anthony V. Baker

Student Scholarship Papers

“for the murder of his own female slave, a woman named Mira...” : Law, Slavery and Incoherence in Antebellum North Carolina

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“The death of culture begins when its normative institutions fail to communicate ideals in ways that remain inwardly compelling...”

Phillip Rieff

In the spring of 1839 a ‘slave owner,’ ­ Mr. John Hoover ­ was arrested for the brutal murder of his own ‘property,’ a young woman named Mira. Convicted of the capital charge by a jury of his peers ­ 12 fellow ‘slave owners,’ as the relevant law then required ­ his appeal to the North Carolina Supreme Court was rejected in ...


From St. Ives To Cyberspace: The Modern Distortion Of The Medieval 'Law Merchant', Stephen E. Sachs Mar 2005

From St. Ives To Cyberspace: The Modern Distortion Of The Medieval 'Law Merchant', Stephen E. Sachs

Student Scholarship Papers

Modern advocates of corporate self-regulation have drawn unlikely inspiration from the Middle Ages. On the traditional view of history, medieval merchants who wandered from fair to fair were not governed by domestic laws, but by their own lex mercatoria, or "law merchant." This law, which uniformly regulated commerce across Europe, was supposedly produced by an autonomous merchant class, interpreted in private courts, and enforced through private sanctions rather than state coercion. Contemporary writers have treated global corporations as descendants of these itinerant traders, urging them to replace conflicting national laws with a law of their own creation. The standard history ...