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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

The Other Violence: Domestic Penal Power Over Children In Chilean Law, Jaime Couso Jan 2003

The Other Violence: Domestic Penal Power Over Children In Chilean Law, Jaime Couso

SELA (Seminario en Latinoamérica de Teoría Constitucional y Política) Papers

The aim of this essay is to examine the relationship between violence and the law in domestic life, and in particular violence exercised on children. The starting-point is an institution of republican family law in the 19th century, which goes back to colonial times, and which I have chosen to call “penal domestic power” over children, which represents a form of legalized domestic violence. It consists of the faculty of the father to punish his son physically, and when that was not enough, to imprison him, for which he could count on help from the public authority.


La Otra Violencia: Poder Penal Doméstico Sobre Los Niños En El Derecho Chileno, Jaime Couso Jan 2003

La Otra Violencia: Poder Penal Doméstico Sobre Los Niños En El Derecho Chileno, Jaime Couso

SELA (Seminario en Latinoamérica de Teoría Constitucional y Política) Papers

Este ensayo tiene por objeto examinar las relaciones entre violencia y Derecho en la vida doméstica, en particular la violencia ejercida sobre los niños. El punto de partida es una institución del Derecho de familia republicano del siglo XIX, que se remonta a la Colonia, que he querido llamar “poder penal doméstico” sobre los niños y que representa una forma de violencia doméstica legalizada. Consiste en la facultad del padre de castigar físicamente a su hijo y, cuando ello no fuere suficiente, de encarcelarlo, para lo cual contaba con el auxilio de la autoridad pública.


Multiple Ironies: Brown At 50, Ronald S. Sullivan Jr. Jan 2003

Multiple Ironies: Brown At 50, Ronald S. Sullivan Jr.

Faculty Scholarship Series

Brown v. Board of Education occupies a vaunted space in American
jurisprudence. One commentator writes that Brown is the most
celebrated case in the Court's history. Equally laudatory, another
commentator remarks: "In the half century since the Supreme Court's
decision, Brown has become a beloved legal and political icon." A
third proclaims that, "Brown forever changed the role of the United States Supreme Court in American politics and society." To the lay
public, Brown sits among a small pantheon of cases that is widely recognizable
to the average American.' Miranda and Roe v. Wade
likely are the only ...