Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Legal History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Public Law And Legal Education In The Nineteenth Century: The Founding Of Burgess' School Of Political Science At Columbia, Alexa S. Bator Oct 1996

Public Law And Legal Education In The Nineteenth Century: The Founding Of Burgess' School Of Political Science At Columbia, Alexa S. Bator

Student Legal History Papers

This paper discusses the founding of the School of Political Science at Columbia University by John W. Burgess in 1880. Burgess established the political science school after failing in his attempts to introduce a program of coursework in political science and public law at Columbia's School of Law. He hoped that the new school would supplement the private-law curriculum of the law school, with the particular aim of preparing students for a career in public service.


The Contracts Notes Of Timothy Merwin: Earliest Evidence Of Instruction At Yale Law School, Peter Stern Jan 1996

The Contracts Notes Of Timothy Merwin: Earliest Evidence Of Instruction At Yale Law School, Peter Stern

Student Legal History Papers

This paper discusses the contracts notes of one of the first students at the Yale Law School. The notes were taken in 1828, making them the earliest known evidence of the method of instruction employed by the law school's founders.


At The Origins Of Law And The State: Monopolization Of Violence, Mutilation Of Bodies, Or Fixing Of Prices?, James Q. Whitman Jan 1996

At The Origins Of Law And The State: Monopolization Of Violence, Mutilation Of Bodies, Or Fixing Of Prices?, James Q. Whitman

Faculty Scholarship Series

In this Article, I would like to air some doubts about our dominant model of the origins of law and the state-what legal historians often call the "self-help" model. The self-help model is widely believed to offer a complete and adequate explanation of the origins and early development of law, and it comes close to being our standard model for explaining all periods in the development of the law.' Nevertheless, I am going to argue that it is significantly flawed. In particular, I am going to try to show that the self-help model rests on a serious misinterpretation of two ...