Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Legal History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Yale Law School

Faculty Scholarship Series

Courts

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

The Governor's Approval Of Legislation In Connecticut, Walter F. Dodd Jan 1929

The Governor's Approval Of Legislation In Connecticut, Walter F. Dodd

Faculty Scholarship Series

THE Supreme Court of Errors of Connecticut in the case of State v.
McCook, decided July 25, 1929, determined an important question as
to the time within which the governor may approve legislation in that
state. Article IV, ยง 12, of the constitution of Connecticut, framed in
1818, is, with verbal changes, and with differences of the period for
executive consideration and in legislative majorities, substantially the
same as the provision of the constitution of the United States with respect
to executive approval or disapproval of legislation.


Constitutional Problems Involved In The Mccook Case, Walter F. Dodd Jan 1929

Constitutional Problems Involved In The Mccook Case, Walter F. Dodd

Faculty Scholarship Series

The Supreme Court of Errors of Connecticut in the case of
State v. McCook, decided July 25, 1929, determined an important
question as to the time within which the governor may approve
legislation in this State. Article IV, sec. 12 of the constitution
of Connecticut, framed in 1818, is, with verbal changes, and
with differences of the period for executive consideration and
in legislative majorities, substantially the same as the provision
of the constitution of the United States with respect to executive
approval or disapproval of legislation.


Notes On Judicial Organization And Procedure, Walter F. Dodd Jan 1928

Notes On Judicial Organization And Procedure, Walter F. Dodd

Faculty Scholarship Series

The Judicial Council Movement. Woodrow Wilson wrote that no
government is better than its courts, to which ex-President Taft replied
that our judicial failure has been more outstanding than our failure in
municipal government. The task of making our courts as efficient as
possible is thus both an important and an urgent one.
Many factors have contributed to the present charges of inefficiency,
but none perhaps of greater weight than that of delay. This has been
particularly true of the larger cities, with their principal trial courts
as much as two years behind in their work. The jury system, both ...