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Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Shall The Executive Agreement Replace The Treaty, Edwin Borchard Jan 1944

Shall The Executive Agreement Replace The Treaty, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

In recent years many political leaders and publicists have sought to prove that the treaty-making process, requiring the "undemocratic." valid and desirable preferably without congressional approval or, by a majority of Congress. 1300 executive agreements have been concluded history, as contrasted 900 i8 that up to 1928 only 15 for good reasons; treaties have been amended by have benefited the nation.

BASES OF THE PROPOSALS FOR CHANGE

The recent proposals for a change in the Constitution, either with or without benefit of a constitutional amendment, have their origin in several grievances and are said to derive moral support from several ...


State Indemnity For Errors Of Criminal Justice, Edwin Borchard Jan 1941

State Indemnity For Errors Of Criminal Justice, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

All too frequently the public is shocked by the news that Federal or State authorities have convicted and imprisoned a person subsequently proved to have been innocent of any crime. These accidents in the administration of the criminal law happen either through an unfortunate concurrence of circumstances or perjured testimony or are the result of mistaken identity, the conviction having been obtained by zealous prosecuting attorneys on circumstantial evidence. In an earnest effort to compensate in some measure the victims of these miscarriages of justice, Congress in May 1938 enacted a law "to grant relief to persons erroneously convicted in ...


Minimum Standard Of The Treatment Of Aliens, Edwin Borchard Jan 1940

Minimum Standard Of The Treatment Of Aliens, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

Its note of August 3, 1938, the Mexican Government, by its Minister of Foreign Affairs, contested the right of the United States to demand compensation for the agricultural lands of American citizens expropriated by Mexico since 1927. It asserted that the countries vigorously maintained “The principle of equality between nationals and foreigners, considering that the foreigner who voluntarily moves to a country... in search of a personal benefit, accepts in advance, together with the advantages which he is going to enjoy, the risks to which he may find himself exposed. It would be unjust that he should aspire to a ...


Justiciability, Edwin Borchard Jan 1936

Justiciability, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

It might be supposed that justiciability, the very foundation of the judicial function, would be a matter on which courts could hardly differ. Yet there seems to be the greatest confusion among the courts as to when an issue is and is not susceptible of judicial decision. This is largely due to a devotion to phrases and symbols which make historical investigation and theoretical analysis seem an unnecessary encroachment on the judicial prerogative. The very system of stare decisis invites courts to relieve themselves of the necessity of thinking through again ostensible propositions which seem to have once received the ...


International Law Of War Since The War, Edwin Borchard Jan 1934

International Law Of War Since The War, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

In all revolutionary periods customary law tends to suffer from emotional attack and from the popular demand for shortcuts to salvation. The function of law as a guaranty of general security, as a source of reliance for the weak, as a necessary foundation for enterprise 'and commitments, as an alternative to force, corruption, and favoritism, is forgotten in the hysterical exaltation of panaceas, punitive methods, and radical departures from tried experience. This is usually accompanied by depreciation of tradition and precedent as obstacles in the way of the new revelation.


Judicial Relief For Insecurity, Edwin Borchard Jan 1933

Judicial Relief For Insecurity, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

In an earlier article' an attempt was made to criticize the narrowness of view which has limited the concept of "wrongs" and "cause of action” to committed delicts, and the concept of the judicial process, to their redress. This superficial view of legal relations and of the judicial function has obscured realization of the fact that harm is done and rights are impaired or jeopardized by mere dispute or challenge before and without any physical attack. The mere existence of an instrument, the denial of a right, the assertion of an unfounded claim, the existence of conflicting claims to the ...


The Uniform Act On Declaratory Judgments, Edwin Borchard Jan 1921

The Uniform Act On Declaratory Judgments, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

The national conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws at its session in St. Louis in August, 1920, approved the first draft of a Uniform Act on Declaratory Judgments. At the next session of the Conference in 1921 the Act will probably receive final approval and be recommended to legislatures for enactment. The importance of the recommendations of this August body in promoting the enactment of legislation in our states warrants some comment upon the draft they have approved.


Some Lessons From The Civil Law, Edwin Borchard Jan 1916

Some Lessons From The Civil Law, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

The purpose of this brief article is not so much to set forth any specific institutions disclosed by a study of the civil law, as to point out some of those defects of our own system which are accentuated by comparison with the civil law, defects due to the methods rather than the substance of the common law. There is no desire to urge such a radical and perhaps impossible step as the substitution of civil law methods for our own; but in the consideration of plans for the improvement of our law, it may be profitable to observe that ...