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Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Treaties And Executive Agreements A Reply, Edwin Borchard Jan 1945

Treaties And Executive Agreements A Reply, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

The authors of the articles under reply, Messrs. McDougal and Lans, have, like McClure, essayed to show that the treaty and the executive agreement are interchangeable, and, since executive agreements are simpler to conclude, they advocate disregarding as obsolete the treaty-making power, requiring, as it does, the consent of two thirds of the Senate, and substituting for it the use of the executive agreement. In that demand they differ radically from the constitutional conclusions which the writer, as well as many other students of the subject, have reached. To give their proposal a more “democratic” tinge, the authors propose what ...


Shall The Executive Agreement Replace The Treaty, Edwin Borchard Jan 1944

Shall The Executive Agreement Replace The Treaty, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

In recent years many political leaders and publicists have sought to prove that the treaty-making process, requiring the "undemocratic." valid and desirable preferably without congressional approval or, by a majority of Congress. 1300 executive agreements have been concluded history, as contrasted 900 i8 that up to 1928 only 15 for good reasons; treaties have been amended by have benefited the nation.

BASES OF THE PROPOSALS FOR CHANGE

The recent proposals for a change in the Constitution, either with or without benefit of a constitutional amendment, have their origin in several grievances and are said to derive moral support from several ...


State Indemnity For Errors Of Criminal Justice, Edwin Borchard Jan 1941

State Indemnity For Errors Of Criminal Justice, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

All too frequently the public is shocked by the news that Federal or State authorities have convicted and imprisoned a person subsequently proved to have been innocent of any crime. These accidents in the administration of the criminal law happen either through an unfortunate concurrence of circumstances or perjured testimony or are the result of mistaken identity, the conviction having been obtained by zealous prosecuting attorneys on circumstantial evidence. In an earnest effort to compensate in some measure the victims of these miscarriages of justice, Congress in May 1938 enacted a law "to grant relief to persons erroneously convicted in ...


Neutrality, Edwin Borchard Jan 1938

Neutrality, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

Before 1914, it was hard to find much difference of opinion among American citizens about the proper policy of the United States in relation to foreign wars or even foreign affairs. That policy, with respect to Europe, was dictated by geographical factors and by a colonial and continental history that left little room for debate. Detachment from Europe's political entanglements, non-intervention in its internal affairs, and neutrality in its wars were the keynotes. After 1898 the acquisition of Asiatic possessions turned America to a Pacific orientation marked by uncertainty and the assumption of unnecessary risks. The desire to play ...


Taney's Influence On Constitutional Law, Edwin Borchard Jan 1936

Taney's Influence On Constitutional Law, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

The hundredth anniversary of the elevation of Roger Brooke Taney to the post of Chief Justice of the Supreme Court affords a fitting occasion to review the significance of his judicial services to the nation and to American constitutional law. A re-examination of his life work in the perspective of history indicates how unwise it often is to form rigid judgments on men and events in the excitement of contemporary emotion, for the harsh opinions which Taney evoked by his decisions on the slavery question have been tempered in the detached light reason. The historical cloud under which his name ...


International Law Of War Since The War, Edwin Borchard Jan 1934

International Law Of War Since The War, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

In all revolutionary periods customary law tends to suffer from emotional attack and from the popular demand for shortcuts to salvation. The function of law as a guaranty of general security, as a source of reliance for the weak, as a necessary foundation for enterprise 'and commitments, as an alternative to force, corruption, and favoritism, is forgotten in the hysterical exaltation of panaceas, punitive methods, and radical departures from tried experience. This is usually accompanied by depreciation of tradition and precedent as obstacles in the way of the new revelation.


The Uniform Act On Declaratory Judgments, Edwin Borchard Jan 1921

The Uniform Act On Declaratory Judgments, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

The national conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws at its session in St. Louis in August, 1920, approved the first draft of a Uniform Act on Declaratory Judgments. At the next session of the Conference in 1921 the Act will probably receive final approval and be recommended to legislatures for enactment. The importance of the recommendations of this August body in promoting the enactment of legislation in our states warrants some comment upon the draft they have approved.


International Pecuniary Claims Against Mexico, Edwin Borchard Jan 1917

International Pecuniary Claims Against Mexico, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

The Claims Commission which will ultimately be established to adjudicate upon claims of citizens of the United States and other countries against Mexico will have to decide some of the most interesting and practical questions of international law. Not the least important of these are the fundamental questions of the liability of the Carranza government for its own acts while a revolutionary faction (the Constitutionalists) and for those of the Huerta government it has displaced. An examination of these questions in the light of international law and precedents may not prove without interest. Assuming that the Carranza government will maintain ...


Jurisprudence In Germany, Edwin Borchard Jan 1912

Jurisprudence In Germany, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

The Library of Congress is now undertaking the publication of a series of guides to foreign law. One of the objects of the enterprise is to acquaint the practitioner and the legislator with the legal institutions of foreign countries. Another of its objects is to show the evolution and present development of juristic thought abroad, and the extent to which a virile philosophy of law and a sound conception of the relation between law and social science have succeeded in creating a jurisprudence which has proved far more efficient than the common law in responding to the needs of present ...