Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Legal History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Yale Law School

Legal Education

Legal Education

Articles 1 - 9 of 9

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Community Policing In New Haven: Social Norms, Police Culture, And The Alleged Crisis Of Criminal Procedure, Caroline Van Zile May 2011

Community Policing In New Haven: Social Norms, Police Culture, And The Alleged Crisis Of Criminal Procedure, Caroline Van Zile

Student Legal History Papers

Nick Pastore will forever be known as one of New Haven’s most colorful historical figures. The Chief of Police in New Haven from 1990 to 1997, Pastore was well-known for his outrageous comments and unusual antics. New Haven’s chief proponent of community policing, Pastore referred to himself in interviews as “’an outstanding patrol officer,’ a ‘super crime-fighting cop,’ ‘a good cop with the Mafia,’ [and] ‘Sherlock Holmes.’” Pastore, unlike his immediate predecessor, highly valued working with the community and advocated for a focus on reducing crime rather than increasing arrests. Pastore once informed that New York Times that ...


Meaningful Community Participation In Land Use Decision Making Through Ad Hoc Procedures In New Haven, Connecticut, Laura Huizar May 2011

Meaningful Community Participation In Land Use Decision Making Through Ad Hoc Procedures In New Haven, Connecticut, Laura Huizar

Student Legal History Papers

The last few decades have seen efforts to develop community-based planning models and other mechanisms for increased community participation in the land use approval process. Community Benefits Agreements (CBAs), in particular, have risen in popularity across the nation as a tool for ensuring meaningful participation in development. Such agreements generally arise from direct negotiation between community groups and developers where community groups push to secure community benefits in exchange for support. At the same time, however, takings law doctrine may be shifting in a way that could dissuade cities from actively incorporating community groups into planning or negotiating with developers ...


Diffuse Aspirations: Mixed-Income Housing In The Context Of For-Profit Urban Revitalization, Christopher Miller May 2011

Diffuse Aspirations: Mixed-Income Housing In The Context Of For-Profit Urban Revitalization, Christopher Miller

Student Legal History Papers

This paper evaluates the success of mixed-income housing in the context of a for-profit development in New Haven, Connecticut. It takes as its sample the development and the tenants of The Residences at Ninth Square, a mixed-use, mixed-income apartment complex located in the center of the historic city. The early parts of the paper (Parts II-III) tell the story of the neighborhood and contextualize the study in the geography and the history of New Haven, Connecticut. Part IV describes the development in detail. Part V looks to the expectations and commitments undertaken by the developers of The Residences. Part VI ...


When Was The Yale Law School Really Founded?, Michael T. Sansbury May 2001

When Was The Yale Law School Really Founded?, Michael T. Sansbury

Student Legal History Papers

In 1874, during the celebration of the Yale Law School's "Semicentennial Anniversary," Theodore Woolsey, a former Yale President and Professor at the Law School, claimed that the Law School had been founded in 1824 when a group of students were listed as "Law Students" in the Yale Catalogue. These students studied in a small proprietary law school started by Seth P. Staples and operated, in 1824, by Samuel J. Hitchcock and David Daggett. Their listing in the catalogue seems to indicate a connection between the Staples-Hitchcock-Daggett school and Yale College. Since 1874, Yale historians and the Yale Law School ...


The Relationship Between Yale's Law School And The Central University In The Late Nineteenth Century, Mark Bartholomew Feb 2000

The Relationship Between Yale's Law School And The Central University In The Late Nineteenth Century, Mark Bartholomew

Student Legal History Papers

This paper describes the Yale Law School in the late 1800s. For most of the period, the school's faculty struggled to gain the attention of an unresponsive university administration. At the same time, the faculty pushed for interdisciplinary study that would tie the Law School to the university's other academic departments.


A Study Of The Housing Patterns Of Yale Law School Students, Masato Hayakawa Oct 1999

A Study Of The Housing Patterns Of Yale Law School Students, Masato Hayakawa

Student Legal History Papers

In 1948, only about one-tenth of the law students lived in what we now term the law student ghetto. By 1997, more law students lived in this neighborhood than in any other - students in this neighborhood outnumbered students living in other off-campus neighborhoods by a margin of two-to-one, and they made up a simple majority of the enrollment.

This paper examines the formation of this concentration. The evidence shows that the law student ghetto did no always exist in its current form, but rather that it is a product of housing developments of the last thirty years. This paper traces ...


The Student View Of Yale Law School 1883-1912: The Shingle, Maureen J. Arrigo Mar 1997

The Student View Of Yale Law School 1883-1912: The Shingle, Maureen J. Arrigo

Student Legal History Papers

During one twenty-year period, the graduating students of Yale Law School published books in which their views of the school (and to a small extent the faculty's views as well) were captured. This series of books - The Yale Shingle - was published from 1893 to 1912.

My goal in writing this paper is profile student life at Yale as reports in the Shingle. Its life spanned an important time in the school's history - a time of significant change.


Public Law And Legal Education In The Nineteenth Century: The Founding Of Burgess' School Of Political Science At Columbia, Alexa S. Bator Oct 1996

Public Law And Legal Education In The Nineteenth Century: The Founding Of Burgess' School Of Political Science At Columbia, Alexa S. Bator

Student Legal History Papers

This paper discusses the founding of the School of Political Science at Columbia University by John W. Burgess in 1880. Burgess established the political science school after failing in his attempts to introduce a program of coursework in political science and public law at Columbia's School of Law. He hoped that the new school would supplement the private-law curriculum of the law school, with the particular aim of preparing students for a career in public service.


The Contracts Notes Of Timothy Merwin: Earliest Evidence Of Instruction At Yale Law School, Peter Stern Jan 1996

The Contracts Notes Of Timothy Merwin: Earliest Evidence Of Instruction At Yale Law School, Peter Stern

Student Legal History Papers

This paper discusses the contracts notes of one of the first students at the Yale Law School. The notes were taken in 1828, making them the earliest known evidence of the method of instruction employed by the law school's founders.