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SelectedWorks

2012

Labor and Employment Law

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Analysis: Williams V Scott, Jon Foster Apr 2012

Analysis: Williams V Scott, Jon Foster

Jon Foster

In the case of Williams v Scott, the Court has been asked to determine the constitutionality of Senate Bill 2100 in relation to the rights of public sector employees to collectively bargain.


Back To The Future: Introducing Constructive Feminism For The Twenty-First Century: A New Paradigm For The Family And Medical Leave Act, Arianne Renan Barzilay Dr. Jan 2012

Back To The Future: Introducing Constructive Feminism For The Twenty-First Century: A New Paradigm For The Family And Medical Leave Act, Arianne Renan Barzilay Dr.

Arianne Renan Barzilay Dr. (J.S.D., New York University School of Law)

Abstract: At least ninety percent (90%) of American parents, mothers and fathers, say they are experiencing an acute shortage of time spent with family and an intense work-family conflict. This article provides a history and a theory that should inform our conceptualization of work-family regulation. It points to the neglected history of working-class social feminism. It shows how working-class social feminists at the beginning of the twentieth century advocated for “constructive feminism”—government support, by way of labor regulation, of what this article terms “multidimensionalism”—a life enriched by meaningful dimensions of work, family, civic participation, and culture. The Article ...


Labor Regulation As Family Regulation: Decent Work And Decent Families, Arianne Renan Barzilay Dr. Jan 2012

Labor Regulation As Family Regulation: Decent Work And Decent Families, Arianne Renan Barzilay Dr.

Arianne Renan Barzilay Dr. (J.S.D., New York University School of Law)

It is due time that we understood that regulating the family has been a longstanding goal of labor regulation. This article presents the trajectory of labor regulation as family regulation. It provides a history of the "decent standards" discourse pertaining to wage and hour regulation, and reveals its double meanings: to provide "decent work" and to promote "decent families. " It terms the goal of providing decent standards of work and wages as "productive decency" and the goals pertaining to family decency, proper gender norms, and sexual purity as "repressive decency. " It shows how labor regulation surprisingly began in the Progressive ...