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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Tre Giuristi Perugini Cinquecenteschi: Giovan Paolo Lancellotti, Paolo Comitoli, Benincasio Benincasa, Adolfo Giuliani Jan 2009

Tre Giuristi Perugini Cinquecenteschi: Giovan Paolo Lancellotti, Paolo Comitoli, Benincasio Benincasa, Adolfo Giuliani

Adolfo Giuliani

Why did moral theology become such an important source of legal principles in the late 16th century? This paper argues that to begin to understand the pervasive moral transformation of those decades we need first to consider the ways by which those jurists confidently rewrote the boundaries between canon law, civil law and moral theology.
This paper is focused on the three jurists — a civilian, a canonist and a theologian — who shared the intellectual atmosphere of the university of Perugia between 16th and 17th century: Giovan Paolo Lancellotti, Paolo Comitoli and Benincasio Benincasa.
The full-text is available from my SSRN ...


Introduction, Robert Tennyson Jan 2009

Introduction, Robert Tennyson

Robert Tennyson

This is a study of the private legislative business of parliament between 1688 and 1774, the preconditions of its growth and the manner of its legitimization. Through the eighteenth century, the products of parliament’s private business increasingly impacted the lives of Englishmen, at every rung on the social ladder. Yet, despite the number, variety and extent of these proposals passing through parliament and sanctioned by its private legislation, our understanding of this critical aspect of parliament’s agency in the eighteenth century is remarkably underdeveloped. This study endeavors to extend our understanding of this business through a detailed examination ...


Full Faith And Credit In The Early Congress, Stephen E. Sachs Jan 2009

Full Faith And Credit In The Early Congress, Stephen E. Sachs

Stephen E. Sachs

After more than 200 years, the Full Faith and Credit Clause remains poorly understood. The Clause first issues a self-executing command (that "Full Faith and Credit shall be given"), and then empowers Congress to prescribe the manner of proof and the "Effect" of state records in other states. But if states must accord each other full faith and credit-and if nothing could be more than full-then what "Effect" could Congress give state records that they wouldn't have already? And conversely, how could Congress in any way reduce or alter the faith and credit that is due? This Article seeks ...