Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Legal History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University

John Bird

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Judgment Book Of Superior Court, Vol. A, Aug. 1744--[June 1750], At 463-64, New Hampshire State Archives - Ruling For Elizabeth Bird Sep 1749

Judgment Book Of Superior Court, Vol. A, Aug. 1744--[June 1750], At 463-64, New Hampshire State Archives - Ruling For Elizabeth Bird

Documents from Making Habeas Work: A Legal History (monograph)

An abused apprentice, she [Elizabeth Bird, the mother]prayed simply for “the advisement of this Court on the Premises and that your complainant may have some relief in the Premises.


Judgment Book Of Superior Court, Vol. A, Aug. 1744--[June 1750], At 341-42, New Hampshire State Archives - Bird Order Sep 1749

Judgment Book Of Superior Court, Vol. A, Aug. 1744--[June 1750], At 341-42, New Hampshire State Archives - Bird Order

Documents from Making Habeas Work: A Legal History (monograph)

The court responded by issuing a writ of habeas corpus to have Winter brought before it, which was done the same day. It reviewed the indenture he produced, and there being “nothing made to appear that the said servant had ever been provided for as in said indenture mentioned and the particular facts complained of appearing to be true” ... the court concluded that Winter was not entitled to retain John’s custody, which was returned to his mother.


Provincial Case File No. 23254, New Hampshire State Archives - Petition Of Elizabeth Bird Aug 1749

Provincial Case File No. 23254, New Hampshire State Archives - Petition Of Elizabeth Bird

Documents from Making Habeas Work: A Legal History (monograph)

In the fall of 1749, the widow Elizabeth Bird of Portsmouth, New Hampshire complained in forma pauperis to the Superior Court that her son John Bird, age fourteen, was apprenticed to a ropemaker named Richard Winter but that the latter (who was in prison) had for a long period neglected John--failing “to provide suitable and sufficient meat drink lodging and clothing” and not permitting him to attend public worship. She prayed simply for “the advisement of this Court on the Premises and that your complainant may have some relief in the Premises.