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Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University

1714

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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Provincial Case File No. 17944, New Hampshire State Archives - Petition Of Charles Banfild, August 12, 1714 Aug 1714

Provincial Case File No. 17944, New Hampshire State Archives - Petition Of Charles Banfild, August 12, 1714

Documents from Making Habeas Work: A Legal History (monograph)

In 1714, Charles Banfild was an appointed constable for the town of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. One of his duties was to collect taxes from the townspeople and remit them to the Selectmen. ... As he explained to the New Hampshire Superior Court in mid-August of that year, he used his best endeavours to collect but the “people would not pay.” And as fast as he hauled the delinquents before the local Justices of the Peace (“J.P.s”) for non-payment, just as fast did the J.P.s discharge them. This process was interrupted only by his own imprisonment for nonpayment ...


Superior Court Minutes, 1699-1750, Superior Court Docket Box 1, Folder 1710-1719, New Hampshire State Archives - Confirms Judgment Of Charles Banfild Aug 1714

Superior Court Minutes, 1699-1750, Superior Court Docket Box 1, Folder 1710-1719, New Hampshire State Archives - Confirms Judgment Of Charles Banfild

Documents from Making Habeas Work: A Legal History (monograph)

… and the parties worked out an arrangement for Banfild’s prompt release. Banfild and a guarantor would enter into a penal bond obligating themselves to pay twice the amount due unless within five weeks Banfild paid to the Selectmen the taxes they claimed, less the amounts owed by taxpayers whose obligations the J.P.s had forgiven.


Provincial Case File No. 17944, New Hampshire State Archives - Petition Of Charles Banfild, August 10, 1714 Aug 1714

Provincial Case File No. 17944, New Hampshire State Archives - Petition Of Charles Banfild, August 10, 1714

Documents from Making Habeas Work: A Legal History (monograph)

In 1714, Charles Banfild was an appointed constable for the town of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. One of his duties was to collect taxes from the townspeople and remit them to the Selectmen. ... As he explained to the New Hampshire Superior Court in mid-August of that year, he used his best endeavours to collect but the “people would not pay.” And as fast as he hauled the delinquents before the local Justices of the Peace (“J.P.s”) for non-payment, just as fast did the J.P.s discharge them. This process was interrupted only by his own imprisonment for nonpayment ...


Journal Of The House Of Representatives, July 24, 1714. Jul 1714

Journal Of The House Of Representatives, July 24, 1714.

Documents from Making Habeas Work: A Legal History (monograph)

The underlying dispute between rival slates of officeholders was resolved over the summer by the provincial House of Representatives.


Superior Court Docket Book, 1699–1738, At 86, New Hampshire State Archives (Spelling In Original).- Judgment Of Charles Banfild Feb 1714

Superior Court Docket Book, 1699–1738, At 86, New Hampshire State Archives (Spelling In Original).- Judgment Of Charles Banfild

Documents from Making Habeas Work: A Legal History (monograph)

When the Court considered the matter on August 11, 1714, it ordered Banfild to be brought before it, “which order the Sheriff refused to obay.” Irritated, the Court told the Sherriff to have before it the next day not only Banfild “in safe custody,” but also the Justices of the Peace who had committed him to prison, and the Selectmen complained of.


Provincial Case File No. 17944, New Hampshire State Archives - Petition Of Charles Banfild, Undated Dec 1713

Provincial Case File No. 17944, New Hampshire State Archives - Petition Of Charles Banfild, Undated

Documents from Making Habeas Work: A Legal History (monograph)

In 1714, Charles Banfild was an appointed constable for the town of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. One of his duties was to collect taxes from the townspeople and remit them to the Selectmen. ... As he explained to the New Hampshire Superior Court in mid-August of that year, he used his best endeavours to collect but the “people would not pay.” And as fast as he hauled the delinquents before the local Justices of the Peace (“J.P.s”) for non-payment, just as fast did the J.P.s discharge them. This process was interrupted only by his own imprisonment for nonpayment ...