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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

A Good Step In The Right Direction: Illinois Eliminates The Conflict Between Attorneys And Guardians, 38 J. Legal Prof. 161 (2013), Alberto Bernabe Jan 2013

A Good Step In The Right Direction: Illinois Eliminates The Conflict Between Attorneys And Guardians, 38 J. Legal Prof. 161 (2013), Alberto Bernabe

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Save Our Children: Overcoming The Narrative That Gays And Lesbians Are Harmful To Children, 21 Duke J. Gender L. & Pol'y 125 (2013), Anthony Niedwiecki Jan 2013

Save Our Children: Overcoming The Narrative That Gays And Lesbians Are Harmful To Children, 21 Duke J. Gender L. & Pol'y 125 (2013), Anthony Niedwiecki

Faculty Scholarship

This paper focuses on how gay rights activists had no real choice but to use the court system to advance marriage rights for same-sex couples because they were unable to use the political process to effectively rebut the claim that gays and lesbians were harmful to children. Part I begins with an overview of the ways in which the initiative process has been used to limit gay rights and prevent marriage equality. It then details how, in contrast to the political process, courts have been more receptive to advancing marriage rights for same-sex couples. Part II details Walter Fisher's ...


Losing All Sense Of Just Proportion: The Peculiar Law Of Accomplice Liability, 87 St. John’S Law Rev. 129 (2013), Michael G. Heyman Jan 2013

Losing All Sense Of Just Proportion: The Peculiar Law Of Accomplice Liability, 87 St. John’S Law Rev. 129 (2013), Michael G. Heyman

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


A Uniform Perpetuities Reform Act, 16 N.Y.U. J. Legis. & Pub. Pol'y 89 (2013), Scott Andrew Shepard Jan 2013

A Uniform Perpetuities Reform Act, 16 N.Y.U. J. Legis. & Pub. Pol'y 89 (2013), Scott Andrew Shepard

Faculty Scholarship

For centuries the Rule Against Perpetuities provided protection against a pair of dangers: that important stocks of property would become, effectively, permanently inalienable as a result of perpetual conditional gifts; and that the dead would be permitted to control the destinies of the living by placing permanent conditions on the fixed stock of available wealth (i.e., land wealth). In recent decades, though, the states have increasingly abandoned the Rule and its protections. As of 2011 all states have migrated, at least in part, beyond the traditional "twenty-one-years- plus-life-in-being" rule, and more than half have actually or effectively abolished their ...