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Georgetown University Law Center

Justice

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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

The Limits Of Process, Robin West Jan 2011

The Limits Of Process, Robin West

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

This article presents four major objections to Jeremy Waldron’s claim that for “Rule of Law” to exist it we must move beyond basic formal requirements that laws be general and knowable rules we can all comply with, towards substantive requirements that when the law imposes its censorial and punitive will upon us, it is applied in a way that acknowledges our intelligence and respects our individual dignity. After challenging Waldron’s claim, the author suggests that if Rule of Law theorizing is intended to capture our ideals of law, then the three paradigms of Rule of Law scholarship that ...


Is The Rule Of Law Cosmopolitan?, Robin West Jan 2000

Is The Rule Of Law Cosmopolitan?, Robin West

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

What I will argue in the bulk of the paper is that whether or not the rule of law implies ethical cosmopolitanism depends: it depends on how we understand or interpret the legalistic sense of justice that law and the rule of law seemingly require. The virtue that we sometimes call legal justice, and the correlative meaning of the rule of law to which it is yoked, can plausibly be subjected to a range of different interpretations, each resting on quite different understandings of the point of law and of what the individual law is meant to protect. Some of ...


Coping With Partiality: Justice, The Rule Of Law, And The Role Of Lawyers, Randy E. Barnett Jan 1997

Coping With Partiality: Justice, The Rule Of Law, And The Role Of Lawyers, Randy E. Barnett

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Lawyers help ameliorate a particular instance of what the author calls the problem of interest--the partiality problem. For he believes that it falls to law professors to imbue in their students an understanding of the important role that lawyers play in society, if for no other reason than they will need some emotional armament from the slings and arrows of incessant lawyer jokes and worse. In explaining how the existence of lawyers helps address the problem of partiality, the author also explains how adherence to property rights, freedom of contract, and the rule of law--concepts long disparaged by law professors--help ...