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Georgetown University Law Center

Constitutional law

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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Framer’S Intent: Gouverneur Morris, The Committee Of Style, And The Creation Of The Federalist Constitution, William M. Treanor Jan 2019

Framer’S Intent: Gouverneur Morris, The Committee Of Style, And The Creation Of The Federalist Constitution, William M. Treanor

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

At the end of the proceedings of the federal constitutional convention, the delegates appointed the Committee on Style and Arrangement to bring together the textual provisions that the convention had previously agreed to and to prepare a final constitution. Pennsylvania delegate Gouverneur Morris was assigned to draft the document for the committee, and, with few revisions and little debate, the convention subsequently adopted the Committee’s proposed constitution. For more than two hundred years, questions have been raised as to whether Morris as drafter covertly made changes in the text in order to advance his constitutional vision, but the legal ...


Is Law? Constitutional Crisis And Existential Anxiety, Alice G. Ristroph Jan 2009

Is Law? Constitutional Crisis And Existential Anxiety, Alice G. Ristroph

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

In the recurring discussions of constitutional crises, one may find three forms of existential anxiety. The first, and most fleeting, is an anxiety about the continued existence of the nation. A second form of anxiety—to my mind, the most interesting form—is an anxiety about the possibility of the rule of law itself. Third, and most solipsistically, references to crisis in constitutional law scholarship could be the product of a kind of professional anxiety in the legal academy. We may be asking ourselves, “Constitutional theory: what is it good for?” and worrying that the answer is, “Absolutely nothing.” And ...


The Proper Scope Of The Police Power, Randy E. Barnett Jan 2004

The Proper Scope Of The Police Power, Randy E. Barnett

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

In this Article, I will contend that the Constitution is not really silent at all on the proper scope of state powers; that the original meaning of what the Constitution says requires that state powers over their citizens have fairly easy to identify limits - though as with most constitutional provisions, applying these limits to particular cases requires judgment and is not a matter of strict deductive logic. This account will require me to briefly review the method of interpretation I advocate - original meaning originalism-and its limits. These limits require that interpretation of original meaning be implemented by means of constitutional ...


Rex E. Lee Conference On The Office Of The Solicitor General Of The United States: Panel For Former Solicitors General, Seth P. Waxman, Walter E. Dellinger Iii, Kenneth W. Starr, Charles Fried, Drew S. Days Iii Jan 2003

Rex E. Lee Conference On The Office Of The Solicitor General Of The United States: Panel For Former Solicitors General, Seth P. Waxman, Walter E. Dellinger Iii, Kenneth W. Starr, Charles Fried, Drew S. Days Iii

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

I agree entirely that the chain of command is clear and that the Framers managed to make it all the way through all the articles of the Constitution without even conceiving of a solicitor general, let alone bothering to mention an attorney general. It is important nonetheless to distinguish between those things the solicitor general does pursuant to the longstanding notice-and-comment regulation, and the other things a solicitor general may do pursuant to his (and, someday, her!) statutory obligation to be of general assistance to the attorney general.