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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Brief Amici Curiae Of Legal Historians Listed Herein In Support Of The Petitioners, Rasul V. Bush, Nos. 03-334 & 03-343 (U.S. Jan. 14, 2004), James Oldham Jan 2004

Brief Amici Curiae Of Legal Historians Listed Herein In Support Of The Petitioners, Rasul V. Bush, Nos. 03-334 & 03-343 (U.S. Jan. 14, 2004), James Oldham

U.S. Supreme Court Briefs

No abstract provided.


Introduction: Rawls And The Law, William Michael Treanor Jan 2004

Introduction: Rawls And The Law, William Michael Treanor

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Professor John Rawls of Harvard University, who died in November of 2002, is widely regarded as the most important political philosopher of the twentieth century, and his influence on legal thought was particularly profound. There have been a number of conferences or symposia on Rawls's individual books, such as A Theory of Justice and Political Liberalism, but, astonishingly, until the symposium presented in this issue of the Fordham Law Review was held in November 2003, no symposium or conference had focused on the implications of his work for the law. Simply because of its subject, then, this symposium was ...


The Lawyer's Role(S) In Deliberative Democracy, Carrie Menkel-Meadow Jan 2004

The Lawyer's Role(S) In Deliberative Democracy, Carrie Menkel-Meadow

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

In this paper I will explore the idea of a "neutral" lawyer who may have neither "client" (in the conventional sense of client) to represent nor advocacy to perform, yet still be functioning fully as a lawyer or "learned professional" schooled in the law. Indeed, in this paper I will suggest that lawyers may be especially useful in performing a variety of "new" functions that depart from traditional conceptions of the lawyer's role, but which lawyers may be especially well suited to perform. It may be counter-cultural to think of lawyers as "consensus builders," rather than as advocates or ...


The Proper Scope Of The Police Power, Randy E. Barnett Jan 2004

The Proper Scope Of The Police Power, Randy E. Barnett

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

In this Article, I will contend that the Constitution is not really silent at all on the proper scope of state powers; that the original meaning of what the Constitution says requires that state powers over their citizens have fairly easy to identify limits - though as with most constitutional provisions, applying these limits to particular cases requires judgment and is not a matter of strict deductive logic. This account will require me to briefly review the method of interpretation I advocate - original meaning originalism-and its limits. These limits require that interpretation of original meaning be implemented by means of constitutional ...


The Coiled Serpent Of Argument: Reason, Authority, And Law In A Talmudic Tale, David Luban Jan 2004

The Coiled Serpent Of Argument: Reason, Authority, And Law In A Talmudic Tale, David Luban

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

One of the most celebrated Talmudic parables begins with a remarkably dry legal issue debated among a group of rabbis. A modern reader should think of the rabbis as a collegial court, very much like a secular appellate court, because the purpose of their debate is to generate edicts that will bind the community. The issue under debate concerns the ritual cleanliness of a baked earthenware stove, sliced horizontally into rings and cemented back together with unbaked mortar. Do the laws of purity that apply to uncut stoves apply to this one as well? This stove is the so-called "oven ...


Rethinking Crime Legislation: History And Harshness, Victoria Nourse Jan 2004

Rethinking Crime Legislation: History And Harshness, Victoria Nourse

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

There is a truth about the criminal law that scholars evade as much as they criticize: the criminal law is produced by legislators (rather than the experts). The author states she does not know of any way to make law in a democracy other than through the voters' representatives. And, yet, it is the standard pose of the criminal law scholar to denigrate legislatures and politicians as vindictive, hysterical, or stupid. All of these things may be true but name-calling is a poor substitute for analysis. As in constitutional law, so too in criminal law, it is time to put ...


Lecture Commentary On Islam And International Law: Toward A Positive Mutual Engagement To Realize Shared Ideals, Lama Abu-Odeh Jan 2004

Lecture Commentary On Islam And International Law: Toward A Positive Mutual Engagement To Realize Shared Ideals, Lama Abu-Odeh

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

An-Na'im as I read him is postulating a process theory when it comes to the relationship of Islamic law to international law. He is advocating a bargaining relationship in which the Islamic side and the international side meet as equals in negotiating their contributions to the universal international. This process-based equality can only be achieved if, first, the international eschews its We sternness and the Islamic retains its internal sense of diversity, indeed secularism. The international abandons its Westernness when it abandons its pre-World War II impulse to colonize, imperialize, and hegemonize, acts which at heart render equality in ...


From Legal Disputes To Conflict Resolution And Human Problem Solving: Legal Dispute Resolution In A Multidisciplinary Context, Carrie Menkel-Meadow Jan 2004

From Legal Disputes To Conflict Resolution And Human Problem Solving: Legal Dispute Resolution In A Multidisciplinary Context, Carrie Menkel-Meadow

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Although this essay traces my own intellectual journey as a teacher and scholar of "alternative dispute resolution," it describes as well the evolution of the field of dispute resolution (rooted in legal studies) to the now broader field of conflict resolution that encompasses the study of disputes and conflicts, not only when they "come to law" in legal disputes, but in all forms of human conflict, including the interpersonal, domestic, and international. While my work began in legal disputing, it quickly moved to the more interdisciplinary study of conflict resolution when I sought better solutions to human problems than those ...


A Profusion Of Chancery Reform, James Oldham Jan 2004

A Profusion Of Chancery Reform, James Oldham

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The refrain that law and equity cannot peaceably cohabit the same court is familiar and persistent. In his 1790 treatise on contracts, Joseph Powell protested that blending law and equity was "subversive of first principles." He claimed, "That a right in itself purely legal cannot be the proper subject of discussion in a jurisdiction purely equitable, and that a right purely equitable, cannot be the proper subject of a purely legal jurisdiction, are axioms that cannot be denied," adding for good measure: "It is a proposition as self-evident as that black is not red, or white black." Almost two centuries ...