Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Legal History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

PDF

Formalism

Discipline
Institution
Publication Year
Publication
Publication Type

Articles 1 - 26 of 26

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Multifactoral Free Speech, Alexander Tsesis Oct 2016

Multifactoral Free Speech, Alexander Tsesis

Northwestern University Law Review

This Article presents a multifactoral approach to free speech analysis. Difficult cases present a variety of challenges that require judges to weigh concerns for the protection of robust dialogue, especially about public issues, against concerns that sound in common law (such as reputation), statutory law (such as repose against harassment), and in constitutional law (such as copyright). Even when speech is implicated, the Court should aim to resolve other relevant individual and social issues arising from litigation. Focusing only on free speech categories is likely to discount substantial, and sometimes compelling, social concerns warranting reflection, analysis, and application. Examining the ...


Legal Realism And The Conflict Of Laws, Kermit Roosevelt Iii Jan 2015

Legal Realism And The Conflict Of Laws, Kermit Roosevelt Iii

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

What did legal realism bring to the conflict of laws? Why was the realist critique of the received wisdom so successful? And why, despite that success, is the realist movement in conflict of laws—and, indeed, the whole American choice of law revolution—seen as a failure?

In this Response, I suggest some brief answers to those questions. Realism, I suggest, is more successful than its critics think—though its project remains unfinished. A better understanding of realism's contributions can show us what work remains in the realist project.


An Ethnography Of Abstractions?, Annelise Riles Dec 2014

An Ethnography Of Abstractions?, Annelise Riles

Annelise Riles

No abstract provided.


Defensor Fidei: The Travails Of A Post-Realist Formalist, Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky Dec 2014

Defensor Fidei: The Travails Of A Post-Realist Formalist, Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky

Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky

This Article explores common formalist themes, asking not whether formalism's aspirations are attainable but why formalists still struggle to attain them in the face of sustained attacks by anti-formalists. After briefly sketching the tenets of formalism in Section I, this Article turns to an examination of Summers' "post-realist formalism." Finally, this Article probes the philosophical and psychological attractions of formalism and suggests that formalism's promise of stability and order may be essential to the effective functioning of the legal system, even if this promise can never be realized.


Putting Progress Back Into Progressive: Reclaiming A Philosophy Of History For The Constitution, David Aram Kaiser Jan 2014

Putting Progress Back Into Progressive: Reclaiming A Philosophy Of History For The Constitution, David Aram Kaiser

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

No abstract provided.


Law, Religion, And Pluralism: The Thought And Experiences Of Nathan Isaacs (1886-1941), Samuel Flaks Oct 2013

Law, Religion, And Pluralism: The Thought And Experiences Of Nathan Isaacs (1886-1941), Samuel Flaks

Touro Law Review

No abstract provided.


Past The Pillars Of Hercules: Francis Bacon And The Science Of Rulemaking, Daniel R. Coquillette Jan 2013

Past The Pillars Of Hercules: Francis Bacon And The Science Of Rulemaking, Daniel R. Coquillette

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

The parallels between Bacon's career and that of Edward H. Cooper are, of course, obvious. Bacon was one of the great legal minds of his day. Unlike the common-law judges who formed the law by deciding cases, Bacon expressed his greatness in writing brilliant juristic treatises and, as Lord Chancellor, drafting one of the first modern rule systems, the Ordinances in Chancery (1617-1620).4 Indeed, my thesis is that Bacon invented modern, scientific rulemaking by fusing his new theories of inductive, empirical research with the traditions of equitable pleading and is, in fact, the intellectual forbearer of the likes ...


Separation Of Powers Doctrine On The Modern Supreme Court And Four Doctrinal Approaches To Judicial Decision-Making, R. Randall Kelso Nov 2012

Separation Of Powers Doctrine On The Modern Supreme Court And Four Doctrinal Approaches To Judicial Decision-Making, R. Randall Kelso

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Real Formalists, The Real Realists, And What They Tell Us About Judicial Decision And Legal Education, Edward Rubin Apr 2011

The Real Formalists, The Real Realists, And What They Tell Us About Judicial Decision And Legal Education, Edward Rubin

Michigan Law Review

The periodization of history, like chocolate cake, can have some bad effects on us, but it is hard to resist. We realize, of course, that Julius Caesar didn’t think of himself as “Classical” and Richard the Lionhearted didn’t regard the time in which he lived as the Middle Ages. Placing historical figures in subsequently defined periods separates us from them and impairs our ability to understand them on their own terms. But it is difficult to understand anything about them at all if we try to envision history as continuous and undifferentiated. We need periodization to organize events ...


Formalismo Y Colaboración En El Proceso Civil: Una Introducción Al Paradigma Del Formalismo-Valorativo, Renzo Cavani Feb 2011

Formalismo Y Colaboración En El Proceso Civil: Una Introducción Al Paradigma Del Formalismo-Valorativo, Renzo Cavani

Renzo Cavani

This article presents the main fundaments of "formalismo-valorativo", a new way to think about civil procedural law developed in the south of Brazil. Those fundaments are the concept of form and formalism; the civil procedure as a cultural phenomenon; the relationship between formalism and Constitutional State and the cooperation principle.

O presente artigo apresenta os principais fundamentos do formalismo-valorativo, uma nova forma de pensar o processo civil desenvolvida no sul do Brasil. Aqueles fundamentos são o conceito de forma e formalismo; o processo civil como fenômeno cultural; a relação entre formalismo e Estado Constitucional; e o princípio de cooperação.

El ...


Pragmatic Indeterminacy, Anthony D'Amato Jan 2010

Pragmatic Indeterminacy, Anthony D'Amato

Faculty Working Papers

If, as a result of taking Indeterminacy seriously, we revolutionize the way we teach law and the way we select judges, then we will also revolutionize the way cases are litigated (because the new judges will expect to hear a different kind of argumentation) and the way people order their lives in anticipation of the way their disputes will be decided by these new judges.


Hacia La Construcción De Una Teoría De La Ineficacia Procesal En El Proceso Civil Peruano, Renzo Cavani Jan 2010

Hacia La Construcción De Una Teoría De La Ineficacia Procesal En El Proceso Civil Peruano, Renzo Cavani

Renzo Cavani

This essay has the objective to build the dogmatic fundaments for a procedure inefficacy theory for the peruvian civil procedure.

O presente ensaio tem por objetivo a construção dos fundamentos dogmáticos para uma teoria da ineficácia processual para o processo civil peruano.

El presente ensayo tiene como objetivo la construcción de los fundamentos dogmáticos para una teoría de la ineficacia procesal para el proceso civil peruano.


Blinking On The Bench: How Judges Decide Cases, Chris Guthrie, Jeffrey J. Rachlinski, Andrew J. Wistrich Nov 2007

Blinking On The Bench: How Judges Decide Cases, Chris Guthrie, Jeffrey J. Rachlinski, Andrew J. Wistrich

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

How do judges judge? Do they apply law to facts in a mechanical and deliberative way, as the formalists suggest they do, or do they rely on hunches and gut feelings, as the realists maintain? Debate has raged for decades, but researchers have offered little hard evidence in support of either model. Relying on empirical studies of judicial reasoning and decision making, we propose an entirely new model of judging that provides a more accurate explanation of judicial behavior. Our model accounts for the tendency of the human brain to make automatic, snap judgments, which are surprisingly accurate, but which ...


Comments On The Comments, Robert S. Summers Mar 2007

Comments On The Comments, Robert S. Summers

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

The paper replies to Bix and Soper (Bix 2007; Soper 2007). Bix’s paper raises methodological questions, especially whether a form-theorist merely needs to reflect on form from the arm-chair so to speak. A variety of methods is called for, including conceptual analysis, study of usage, “education in the obvious,” general reflection on the nature of specific functional legal units, empirical research on their operation and effects, and still more. Further methodological remarks are made in response to Soper’s paper. Soper suggests the possibility of substituting “form v. substance” of a unit as the central contrast here rather than ...


The Incompatibility Principle, Harold H. Bruff Jan 2007

The Incompatibility Principle, Harold H. Bruff

Articles

No abstract provided.


Race Nuisance: The Politics Of Law In The Jim Crow Era, Rachel D. Godsil Mar 2006

Race Nuisance: The Politics Of Law In The Jim Crow Era, Rachel D. Godsil

ExpressO

This article explores a startling and previously unnoticed line of cases in which state courts in the Jim Crow era ruled against white plaintiffs trying to use common law nuisance doctrine to achieve residential segregation. These “race-nuisance” cases complicate the view of most legal scholarship that state courts during the Jim Crow era openly eschewed the rule of law in service of white supremacy. Instead, the cases provide rich social historical detail showing southern judges wrestling with their competing allegiance to precedent and the white plaintiffs’ pursuit of racial exclusivity. Surprisingly to many in the academy, the allegiance to precedent ...


Formalism In American Contract Law: Classical And Contemporary, Mark L. Movsesian Jan 2006

Formalism In American Contract Law: Classical And Contemporary, Mark L. Movsesian

Faculty Publications

It is a universally acknowledged truth that we live in a formalist era—at least when it comes to American contract law. Much more than the jurisprudence of a generation ago, today's cutting-edge work in American contract scholarship values the formalist virtues of bright-line rules, objective interpretation, and party autonomy. Policing bargains for substantive fairness seems more and more an outdated notion. Courts, it is thought, should refrain from interfering with market exchanges. Private arbitration has displaced courts in the context of many traditional contract disputes. Even adhesion contracts find their defenders, much to the chagrin of communitarian scholars ...


Morgan Kousser's Noble Dream, Heather K. Gerken May 2001

Morgan Kousser's Noble Dream, Heather K. Gerken

Michigan Law Review

J. Morgan Kousser, professor of history and social science at the California Institute of Technology, is an unusual academic. He enjoys the respect of two quite different groups - historians and civil rights litigators. As a historian, Kousser has written a number of important works on the American South in the tradition of his mentor, C. Vann Woodward, including a foundational book on southern political history, The Shaping of Southern Politics: Suffrage Restriction and the Establishment of the One-Party South, 1880-1910. Many of his writings have become seminal texts among election law scholars. Kousser has also used his historical skills to ...


An Ethnography Of Abstractions?, Annelise Riles Sep 2000

An Ethnography Of Abstractions?, Annelise Riles

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Beyond The Formalism Debate: Expert Reasoning, Fuzzy Logic, And Complex Statutes, Edward S. Adams, Daniel A. Farber Oct 1999

Beyond The Formalism Debate: Expert Reasoning, Fuzzy Logic, And Complex Statutes, Edward S. Adams, Daniel A. Farber

Vanderbilt Law Review

Formalists and antiformalists continue to debate the utility of using legislative history and current social values to interpret statutes. Lost in the debate, however, is a clear model of how judges actually make decisions. Rather than focusing on complex problems presented by actual judicial decisions, formalists and antiformalists concentrate on stylized examples of simple statutes.

In this Article, Professors Adams and Farber construct a more functional model of judicial decisionmaking by focusing on complex problems. They use cognitive psychological research on expert reasoning and techniques from an emerging area in the field of artificial intelligence, fuzzy logic, to construct their ...


Positivism, Emergent And Triumphant, Vincent A. Wellman May 1999

Positivism, Emergent And Triumphant, Vincent A. Wellman

Michigan Law Review

Positivism is one of those words that triggers passionate and often contradictory responses. For some, positivism is a pejorative. Lon Fuller, perhaps more than anyone, charged that positivism was confused about the nature of law, blind to law's inherent morality, and morally corrupting to boot. He even suggested, in different ways, that positivism helped promote the rise of fascism in Europe. Others, in contrast, have treated positivism as a modest and undeniable truth about law. Law, they argued, is morally fallible, and accordingly, the existence and validity of law is a matter of social fact rather than moral necessity ...


Defensor Fidei: The Travails Of A Post-Realist Formalist, Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky Jan 1995

Defensor Fidei: The Travails Of A Post-Realist Formalist, Lyrissa Barnett Lidsky

UF Law Faculty Publications

This Article explores common formalist themes, asking not whether formalism's aspirations are attainable but why formalists still struggle to attain them in the face of sustained attacks by anti-formalists. After briefly sketching the tenets of formalism in Section I, this Article turns to an examination of Summers' "post-realist formalism." Finally, this Article probes the philosophical and psychological attractions of formalism and suggests that formalism's promise of stability and order may be essential to the effective functioning of the legal system, even if this promise can never be realized.


The State Interest In The Good Citizen: Constitutional Balance Between The Citizen And The Perfectionist State, Steve Sheppard Dec 1993

The State Interest In The Good Citizen: Constitutional Balance Between The Citizen And The Perfectionist State, Steve Sheppard

Steve Sheppard

Judges must have flexibility when responding to the changing norms of justice in society, but they must also maintain predictability to enhance the cultural acceptance of the Court’s authority and the authority of law in society. Predictability demands that a rationale for each decision be communicated by the authors of opinions so that it can be replicable by other courts.

The debate over a preferred method of adjudication, balancing or categorical, is moot because the two methods are not mutually exclusive. The important issue is the definition of interests to be promoted or discouraged by law, which must also ...


Separation Of Powers Under The Texas Constitution, Harold H. Bruff Jan 1990

Separation Of Powers Under The Texas Constitution, Harold H. Bruff

Articles

No abstract provided.


Rhetorical Styles On The Fuller Court, Walter F. Pratt Jan 1980

Rhetorical Styles On The Fuller Court, Walter F. Pratt

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Escape From Liberalism: Fact And Value In Karl Llewellyn, Kenneth M. Casebeer Jan 1977

Escape From Liberalism: Fact And Value In Karl Llewellyn, Kenneth M. Casebeer

Articles

No abstract provided.