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Articles 1 - 8 of 8

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

The Controversy Over The Legacy Highway In Utah: An Opportunity For Invitational Rhetoric, Carlo A. Pedrioli Jan 2007

The Controversy Over The Legacy Highway In Utah: An Opportunity For Invitational Rhetoric, Carlo A. Pedrioli

Faculty Scholarship

Beginning in the mid 1990s, residents of Utah began to debate the merits of the “Legacy Highway,” a large highway that would run near the Great Salt Lake in an attempt to alleviate the clogged commute on Interstate-15, which runs north/south through Salt Lake City, the state’s capital. Perhaps not surprisingly, environmental groups were upset with this proposed governmental project. Groups like the Advocates for Safe and Efficient Transportation and the Utah Department of Transportation faced off against the Sierra Club, Stop the Legacy Highway, and Utahns for Better Transportation. Generous amounts of rhetoric, including public discussion and ...


Truth, Deterrence, And The Impeachment Exception , James L. Kainen Jan 2007

Truth, Deterrence, And The Impeachment Exception , James L. Kainen

Faculty Scholarship

James v. Illinois permits illegally-obtained evidence to impeach defendants, but not defense witnesses. Thus far, all courts have construed James to allow impeachment of defendants' hearsay declarations. This article argues against allowing illegally-obtained evidence to impeach defendants' hearsay declarations because doing so unduly diminishes the exclusionary rule's deterrent effect. The distinction between impeaching defendants and defense witnesses disappears when courts allow prosecutors to impeach defendants' hearsay declarations. Because defense witnesses report exculpatory conduct of a defendant who always has a substantial interest in disguising his criminality, their testimony routinely incorporates defendant hearsay. Defense witness testimony thus routinely paves the ...


The Era Of Deference: Courts, Expertise, And The Emergence Of New Deal Administrative Law, Reuel E. Schiller Jan 2007

The Era Of Deference: Courts, Expertise, And The Emergence Of New Deal Administrative Law, Reuel E. Schiller

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Gambling, Commodity Speculation, And The 'Victorian Compromise', Joshua C. Tate Jan 2007

Gambling, Commodity Speculation, And The 'Victorian Compromise', Joshua C. Tate

Faculty Scholarship

This Essay examines two major strands of nineteenth-century jurisprudence related to gambling: Southern cases defining public and private space for the purpose of state gambling statutes, and Northern cases applying the intent to deliver test to speculative contracts. The Essay argues that both lines of cases reflect what Lawrence Friedman has termed the Victorian compromise: A strong official stance against immoral behavior is conjoined with de facto acceptance of many questionable practices, provided that they are conducted in a manner acceptable to the elite. The Essay concludes that nineteenth-century judges sought to preserve the semblance of a strict prohibition against ...


The First Restatement Of Agency: What Was The Agenda?, Deborah A. Demott Jan 2007

The First Restatement Of Agency: What Was The Agenda?, Deborah A. Demott

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Gambling And The Law In The Nineteenth Century South: Evidence From Nacogdoches County, Texas, 1838-1839, Joshua C. Tate Jan 2007

Gambling And The Law In The Nineteenth Century South: Evidence From Nacogdoches County, Texas, 1838-1839, Joshua C. Tate

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Tax Reforms Unraveling, Michael J. Graetz Jan 2007

Tax Reforms Unraveling, Michael J. Graetz

Faculty Scholarship

The Tax Reform Act of 1986 was widely heralded as the most significant change in our nation’s tax law since the income tax was extended to the masses during World War II. It was the crowning domestic policy achievement of President Ronald Reagan, who proclaimed it “the best antipoverty measure, the best pro-family measure and the best job-creation measure ever to come out of the Congress of the United States” (Reagan, 1986). This journal published a symposium on the Tax Reform Act in its first issue. The law’s rate reductions and base broadening reforms were mimicked throughout the ...


A Brief History Of American Telecommunications Regulation, Tim Wu Jan 2007

A Brief History Of American Telecommunications Regulation, Tim Wu

Faculty Scholarship

While the history of governmental regulation of communication is at least as long as the history of censorship, the modern regulation of long-distance, or "tele," communications is relatively short and can be dated to the rise of the telegraph in the mid-19th century. The United States left the telegraph in private hands, unlike countries and as opposed to the U.S. postal system, and has done the same with most of the significant telecommunications facilities that have been developed since. The decision to allow private ownership of telecommunications infrastructure has led to a rather particularized regulation of these private owners ...