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Legal History Commons

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Articles 1 - 11 of 11

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Bringing Light To The Halls Of Shadow, Richard J. Peltz-Steele Oct 2007

Bringing Light To The Halls Of Shadow, Richard J. Peltz-Steele

Faculty Publications

Appellate judges operate in the shadows. Though they don’t see it that way. “We are judged by what we write,” said U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy. True too, court proceedings and records are presumptively open to the public. The West Wing of the White House is certainly not so vulnerable to public scrutiny, and the backrooms of legislative chambers are famously smoke-filled. Yet the parts of court activity that we see and hear seem only to whet our appetite for the rest of the process. In this Preface, the author introduces the subject of the journalist and ...


Race And Wealth Disparity: The Role Of Law And The Legal System, Beverly Moran, Stephanie Wildman Apr 2007

Race And Wealth Disparity: The Role Of Law And The Legal System, Beverly Moran, Stephanie Wildman

Faculty Publications

In response to the prevalent view that American law and legal institutions are class and color blind, this Article provides examples of how legal institutions sometimes do create and maintain racialized wealth disparities. The Article offers examples of this phenomenon by examining a sequence of federal judicial decisions, the federal taxing statutes, the role of legal education, and access to legal services. These examples are instructive because they cut across a broad spectrum of components of the American legal system. By revisiting issues of race and wealth in different legal settings from the Constitution to federal cases, the tax system ...


Second Amendment Incorporation Through The Fourteenth Amendment Privileges Or Immunities And Due Process Clauses, Michael A. Lawrence Jan 2007

Second Amendment Incorporation Through The Fourteenth Amendment Privileges Or Immunities And Due Process Clauses, Michael A. Lawrence

Faculty Publications

The second amendment, alternately maligned over the years as the black sheep of the constitutional family and worse, and praised as a palladium of the liberties of a republic, since it offers a strong moral check against the usurpation and arbitrary power of rulers, should be recognized by the United States Supreme Court to apply to the several States through the Fourteenth Amendment privileges or immunities clause or, alternatively, through the due process clause.

This article suggests that the issue of Second Amendment incorporation presents a useful contemporary mechanism for the Court to revive the long-dormant Fourteenth Amendment privileges or ...


Preconstitutional Federal Power, Matthew L.M. Fletcher Jan 2007

Preconstitutional Federal Power, Matthew L.M. Fletcher

Faculty Publications

In two fields of constitutional law, the Supreme Court has acknowledged that the federal government may possess preconstitutional power, or national authority derived not from the Constitution but from the very fact of sovereignty. This Article analyzes the two areas of law – the Foreign Affairs Power and the Indian Affairs Power – and assesses their viability in future cases. The case recognizing a preconstitutional Foreign Affairs Power resting with the Executive branch, United States v. Curtiss-Wright Export Corp., suffers from poor historical reasoning and has little precedential weight in modern foreign affairs cases, but has never been overruled. The Indian Affairs ...


Government As Liberty's Servant: The "Reasonable Time, Place And Manner" Standard Of Review For All Government Restrictions On Liberty Interests, Michael A. Lawrence Jan 2007

Government As Liberty's Servant: The "Reasonable Time, Place And Manner" Standard Of Review For All Government Restrictions On Liberty Interests, Michael A. Lawrence

Faculty Publications

This essay suggests that the American legal system fails to do proper justice to the robust conception of Liberty under which the nation was founded, and locates a major source of the problem in the Supreme Court’s current presumption-of-constitutionality approach to judicial review, prompted by post-New Deal backlash to Lochner v. New York. This essay offers a new due process clause-based presumption-of-liberty standard of judicial review, modeled on the Court’s existing First Amendment “reasonable time, place and manner” doctrine. This approach, already utilized narrowly by the Third Circuit Federal Court of Appeals in Lutz v. York in 1990 ...


Common Law, Civil Law, And The Administrative State: From Coke To Lochner, Noga Morag-Levine Jan 2007

Common Law, Civil Law, And The Administrative State: From Coke To Lochner, Noga Morag-Levine

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Article I, Section 4 Of The Constitution, The Voting Rights Act, And Restoration Of The Congressional Portion Of The Election Ballot: The Final Frontier Of Felon Disenfranchisement Jurisprudence?, Daniel Martin Katz Jan 2007

Article I, Section 4 Of The Constitution, The Voting Rights Act, And Restoration Of The Congressional Portion Of The Election Ballot: The Final Frontier Of Felon Disenfranchisement Jurisprudence?, Daniel Martin Katz

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Dworkin V. The Philosophers: A Review Essay On Justice In Robes, Michael S. Green Jan 2007

Dworkin V. The Philosophers: A Review Essay On Justice In Robes, Michael S. Green

Faculty Publications

In this review essay, Professor Michael Steven Green argues that Dworkin's reputation among his fellow philosophers has needlessly suffered because of his refusal to back down from his "semantic sting" argument against H. L. A. Hart. Philosophers of law have uniformly rejected the semantic sting argument as a fallacy. Nevertheless Dworkin reaffirms the argument in Justice in Robes, his most recent collection of essays, and devotes much of the book to stubbornly, and unsuccessfully, defending it. This is a pity, because the failure of the semantic sting argument in no way undermines Dworkin's other arguments against Hart.


Book Review Of Faiths Of The Founding Fathers, Davison M. Douglas Jan 2007

Book Review Of Faiths Of The Founding Fathers, Davison M. Douglas

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Marbury In Mexico: Judicial Review’S Precocious Southern Migration, M C. Mirow Jan 2007

Marbury In Mexico: Judicial Review’S Precocious Southern Migration, M C. Mirow

Faculty Publications

In attempting to construct United States-style judicial review for the Mexican Supreme Court in the 1880s, Ignacio Vallarta, president of the court, read Marbury in a way that preceded this use of the case in the United States. Using this surprising fact as a central example, this article makes several important contributions to the field of comparative constitutional law. The work demonstrates that through constitutional migration, novel readings of constitutional sources can arise in foreign fora. In an era when the United States Supreme Court may be accused of parochialism in its constitutional analysis, the article addresses the current controversy ...


Williston As Conservative-Pragmatist, Mark L. Movsesian Jan 2007

Williston As Conservative-Pragmatist, Mark L. Movsesian

Faculty Publications

In her pathbreaking article, "Restatement and Reform: A New Perspective on the Origins of the American Law Institute, Professor N.E.H. Hull rejects the conventional wisdom about the conservative, even reactionary, character of the First Restatements. The truth, she argues, is more subtle. The Restatements, and the larger ALI project of which they were a part, reflect the "'progressive-pragmatic"' worldview of the law professors most responsible for their creation. These professors were reformers. They rejected the formalism of earlier generations; for them, law was not a conceptual system but a practical tool for promoting beneficial social goals. They tempered ...