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1999

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Articles 1 - 30 of 73

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Recovering The Original Fourth Amendment, Thomas Y. Davies Dec 1999

Recovering The Original Fourth Amendment, Thomas Y. Davies

Michigan Law Review

Claims regarding the original or intended meaning of constitutional texts are commonplace in constitutional argument and analysis. All such claims are subject to an implicit validity criterion - only historically authentic assertions should matter. The rub is that the original meaning commonly attributed to a constitutional text may not be authentic. The historical Fourth Amendment is a case in point. If American judges, lawyers, or law teachers were asked what the Framers intended when they adopted the Fourth Amendment, they would likely answer that the Framers intended that all searches and seizures conducted by government officers must be reasonable given the ...


The Influence Of Race In School Finance Reform, James E. Ryan Nov 1999

The Influence Of Race In School Finance Reform, James E. Ryan

Michigan Law Review

It would be an exaggeration to say that school finance reform is all about race, but largely in the same way that it is an exaggeration to say that welfare reform is all about race. Like welfare reform, the controversy generated by school finance litigation and reform has, on the surface, little to do with race. Battles over school funding, which have been waged in nearly forty state supreme courts and at least as many state legislatures, instead appear to be over such issues as the redistribution of resources, retaining local control over education, and the efficacy of increased expenditures ...


Their Pride And Ornament: Judge Benjamin Johnson And The Federal Courts In Early Arkansas, Lynn Foster Oct 1999

Their Pride And Ornament: Judge Benjamin Johnson And The Federal Courts In Early Arkansas, Lynn Foster

University of Arkansas at Little Rock Law Review

No abstract provided.


Beyond The Formalism Debate: Expert Reasoning, Fuzzy Logic, And Complex Statutes, Edward S. Adams, Daniel A. Farber Oct 1999

Beyond The Formalism Debate: Expert Reasoning, Fuzzy Logic, And Complex Statutes, Edward S. Adams, Daniel A. Farber

Vanderbilt Law Review

Formalists and antiformalists continue to debate the utility of using legislative history and current social values to interpret statutes. Lost in the debate, however, is a clear model of how judges actually make decisions. Rather than focusing on complex problems presented by actual judicial decisions, formalists and antiformalists concentrate on stylized examples of simple statutes.

In this Article, Professors Adams and Farber construct a more functional model of judicial decisionmaking by focusing on complex problems. They use cognitive psychological research on expert reasoning and techniques from an emerging area in the field of artificial intelligence, fuzzy logic, to construct their ...


How The Cheyenne Indians Wrote Article 2 Of The Uniform Commercial Code, David Ray Papke Oct 1999

How The Cheyenne Indians Wrote Article 2 Of The Uniform Commercial Code, David Ray Papke

Buffalo Law Review

No abstract provided.


Remarks At Women's Conference Luncheon, Marjorie Creola Mix Sep 1999

Remarks At Women's Conference Luncheon, Marjorie Creola Mix

Buffalo Women's Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Remembering Hon. M. Dolores Denman (1931-2000), Ub Law Forum Sep 1999

Remembering Hon. M. Dolores Denman (1931-2000), Ub Law Forum

Buffalo Women's Law Journal

No abstract provided.


Believing Like A Lawyer, Steven D. Smith Sep 1999

Believing Like A Lawyer, Steven D. Smith

Boston College Law Review

No abstract provided.


Establishing New Legal Doctrine In Managed Care: A Model Of Judicial Response To Industrial Change, Peter D. Jacobson, Scott D. Pomfret Jul 1999

Establishing New Legal Doctrine In Managed Care: A Model Of Judicial Response To Industrial Change, Peter D. Jacobson, Scott D. Pomfret

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Courts are struggling with how to develop legal doctrine in challenges to the new managed care environment. In this Article, we examine how courts have responded in the past to new industries or radical transformations of existing industries. We analyze two historical antecedents, the emergence of railroads in the nineteenth century and mass production in the twentieth century, to explore how courts might react to the current transformation of the health care industry.

In doing so, we offer a model of how courts confront issues of developing legal doctrine, especially regarding liability, associated with nascent or dramatically transformed industries. Our ...


A Note On Trend-Spotting In The Case Law, Keith N. Hylton Jul 1999

A Note On Trend-Spotting In The Case Law, Keith N. Hylton

Boston College Law Review

No abstract provided.


Unpublished Opinions: A Comment, Richard S. Arnold Jul 1999

Unpublished Opinions: A Comment, Richard S. Arnold

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

The Honorable Richard S. Arnold gives a federal appellate judge’s perspective of the unpublished opinions debate.


Rules Of Appellate Advocacy: An Australian Perspective, Michael Kirby Jul 1999

Rules Of Appellate Advocacy: An Australian Perspective, Michael Kirby

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

A justice of Australia's highest court gives advice to appellate advocates. The essay begins with an overview of Australia’s judicial structure. The discussion then focuses on ten rules for appellate advocacy.


When Does The Curiae Need An Amicus?, Luther T. Munford Jul 1999

When Does The Curiae Need An Amicus?, Luther T. Munford

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

An argument is made for freely granting leave of amicus motions.


Discretionary Appellate Review Of Non-Final Orders: It’S Time To Change The Rules, Howard B. Eisenberg, Alan B. Morrison Jul 1999

Discretionary Appellate Review Of Non-Final Orders: It’S Time To Change The Rules, Howard B. Eisenberg, Alan B. Morrison

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

This article discusses the uncertainty of United States Courts of Appeals jurisdiction over non-final orders.


The Strange History Of "All Men Are Created Equal", Pauline Maier Jun 1999

The Strange History Of "All Men Are Created Equal", Pauline Maier

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


The American Founders' Responsibility, Ralph Lerner Jun 1999

The American Founders' Responsibility, Ralph Lerner

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Qualities Of Completeness: More? Or Less?, Mark R. Killenbeck May 1999

The Qualities Of Completeness: More? Or Less?, Mark R. Killenbeck

Michigan Law Review

On January 14, 1983, Chief Judge W. Brevard Hand announced what he knew would be widely regarded as a rather startling proposition. Believing that "[t]he first amendment in large part was a guarantee to the states which insured that the states would be able to continue whatever church-state relationship existed in 1791," Judge Hand held that the people of Alabama were perfectly free to "establish[] a religion," in this instance by allowing public school teachers to begin the school day with prayer. The ruling reversed an earlier decision in the same case, which characterized the statutory provision at issue ...


Forgotten Constitutional History: The Production And Migration Of Meaning Within Constitutional Cultures, Gregory A. Mark May 1999

Forgotten Constitutional History: The Production And Migration Of Meaning Within Constitutional Cultures, Gregory A. Mark

Michigan Law Review

When was the last time you read a serious, recently published work of constitutional history that did not deal mainly with the work of the Supreme Court? When, even among those works, did the author look beyond the immediate litigants to give the reader a sense of an evolving constitutional culture - a culture in symbiosis with the larger political and social culture - its eddies and byways, as well as its mainstream? My strong hunch is that anyone who can triumphantly respond to the implicit condemnation of narrowness in these questions will do so in large measure having read either or ...


From Renaissance Poland To Poland's Renaissance, Daniel H. Cole May 1999

From Renaissance Poland To Poland's Renaissance, Daniel H. Cole

Michigan Law Review

Poland is located in Eastern Europe - the "other Europe" - which shares a continent, but seemingly little else, with Western Europe. Most histories of Europe, legal histories included, are actually histories of Western Europe only. The "euro-centrism" some scholars complain about is, more accurately, a "western eurocentrism." The eastern half of the continent is ignored like the embarrassing black sheep of the European family. Economic historians have described Eastern Europe as a "backward" place, where feudal and mercantilist economies persisted as Western European economies modernized and industrialized. In geopolitical terms, Eastern Europe has been characterized as a region of "underdevelopment and ...


The Assault That Failed: The Progressive Critique Of Laissez Faire, Richard A. Epstein May 1999

The Assault That Failed: The Progressive Critique Of Laissez Faire, Richard A. Epstein

Michigan Law Review

Robert Lee Hale has long been an intellectual thorn in the side of the defenders of laissez faire, among whom I am quite happy to count myself. As Barbara Fried notes in her meticulous study of Hale's work, his name is hardly a household word. But both directly and indirectly, his influence continues to be great. His best known work is perhaps Coercion and Distribution in a Supposedly Non-Coercive State, published in 1923 as a review of Thomas Nixon Carver's Principles of National Economy, itself a defense of the classical principles of laissez faire, remembered today only for ...


Positivism, Emergent And Triumphant, Vincent A. Wellman May 1999

Positivism, Emergent And Triumphant, Vincent A. Wellman

Michigan Law Review

Positivism is one of those words that triggers passionate and often contradictory responses. For some, positivism is a pejorative. Lon Fuller, perhaps more than anyone, charged that positivism was confused about the nature of law, blind to law's inherent morality, and morally corrupting to boot. He even suggested, in different ways, that positivism helped promote the rise of fascism in Europe. Others, in contrast, have treated positivism as a modest and undeniable truth about law. Law, they argued, is morally fallible, and accordingly, the existence and validity of law is a matter of social fact rather than moral necessity ...


Regionalism And The Religion Clauses: The Contribution Of Fisher Ames, Marc M. Arkin Apr 1999

Regionalism And The Religion Clauses: The Contribution Of Fisher Ames, Marc M. Arkin

Buffalo Law Review

No abstract provided.


Regulating Paid Household Work: Class, Gender, Race, And Agendas Of Reform , Peggie R. Smith Apr 1999

Regulating Paid Household Work: Class, Gender, Race, And Agendas Of Reform , Peggie R. Smith

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Appendix: Biographies Of Participants , American University Law Review Apr 1999

Appendix: Biographies Of Participants , American University Law Review

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Transcript: Responses To The Debate On Whether Congress Must End The Disenfranchisement Of The District Of Columbia , American University Law Review Mar 1999

Transcript: Responses To The Debate On Whether Congress Must End The Disenfranchisement Of The District Of Columbia , American University Law Review

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Reconceiving The Right To Present Witnesses, Richard A. Nagareda Mar 1999

Reconceiving The Right To Present Witnesses, Richard A. Nagareda

Michigan Law Review

Modem American law is, in a sense, a system of compartments. For understandable curricular reasons, legal education sharply distinguishes the law of evidence from both constitutional law and criminal procedure. In fact, the lines of demarcation between these three subjects extend well beyond law school to the organization of the leading treatises and case headnotes to which practicing lawyers routinely refer in their trade. Many of the most interesting questions in the law, however, do not rest squarely within a single compartment; instead, they concern the content and legitimacy of the lines of demarcation themselves. This article explores a significant ...


Transcript: Welcome Address, American University Law Review Feb 1999

Transcript: Welcome Address, American University Law Review

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Transcript: Must Congress End The Disenfranchisement Of The District Of Columbia? A Constitutional Debate , American University Law Review Feb 1999

Transcript: Must Congress End The Disenfranchisement Of The District Of Columbia? A Constitutional Debate , American University Law Review

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Transcript: Keynote Address , American University Law Review Feb 1999

Transcript: Keynote Address , American University Law Review

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


Transcript: What Makes The District An Anomaly? , American University Law Review Feb 1999

Transcript: What Makes The District An Anomaly? , American University Law Review

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.