Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Legal History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

I Don't Want To Play God: A Response To Professor Tremblay, Justine A. Dunlap Jan 1999

I Don't Want To Play God: A Response To Professor Tremblay, Justine A. Dunlap

Faculty Publications

In Acting "A Very Moral Type of God": Triage Among Poor Clients, an article in this Symposium issue, Professor Paul R. Tremblay argues for the need for triage in the selection of legal services cases and clients and suggests a formula for making those triage decisions. While many of Professor Tremblay's views are unassailable, there is a part of me that rejects absolutely his hierarchy of case selection. In this musing on Professor Tremblay's meditation, I attempt to sort out the basis for my strong reaction to some of his points. I join others who have rejected a ...


The Privilege's Last Stand: The Privilege Against Self-Incrimination And The Right To Rebel Against The State, Michael S. Green Jan 1999

The Privilege's Last Stand: The Privilege Against Self-Incrimination And The Right To Rebel Against The State, Michael S. Green

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Defending Truth, Cynthia V. Ward, Peter A. Alces Jan 1999

Defending Truth, Cynthia V. Ward, Peter A. Alces

Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Bastardy And The Statute Of Wills: Interpreting A Sixteenth-Century Statute With Cases And Readings, M C. Mirow Jan 1999

Bastardy And The Statute Of Wills: Interpreting A Sixteenth-Century Statute With Cases And Readings, M C. Mirow

Faculty Publications

The Statute of Wills of 1540 created a tax loophole for transfers of property to illegitimate children. Assessments for wardships that would normally be imposed on certain transfers of land to children could be effectively avoided by establishing that the donee was illegitimate, and therefore a stranger to the donor for the purposes of the statute. English lawyers in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries educated their colleagues about this newly available loophole. In the inns of court, lawyers discussed the statutory provisions and recent revenue cases from the Court of Wards. This article sets out the loophole, examines how the ...


Sovereignty, Compliance, And The World Trade Organization: Lessons From The History Of Supreme Court Review, Mark L. Movsesian Jan 1999

Sovereignty, Compliance, And The World Trade Organization: Lessons From The History Of Supreme Court Review, Mark L. Movsesian

Faculty Publications

One of the World Trade Organization’s (WTO's) more remarkable and controversial innovations is its mechanism for resolving trade disputes among member states. Traditionally, states have resolved such disputes in "pragmatic" fashion, through negotiation and compromise informed by the relative power of the parties involved. But no longer: the WTO's Understanding on Rules and Procedures Governing the Settlement of Disputes (the DSU) provides that disputes between member states are to be resolved in adversary proceedings before impartial panels of experts." Under the DSU, panels have authority to decide whether members' laws violate international trade norms; panel decisions are ...


British Masculinities, Canadian Lawyers, W. Wesley Pue Jan 1999

British Masculinities, Canadian Lawyers, W. Wesley Pue

Faculty Publications

This paper explores the construction of early twentieth century Canadian legal professionalism as the workings-out of Britishness understood through the lenses of cultural history, cultures of imperialism, and gender relations. It provides a case study in the histories of professionalism in a settler colony.