Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Legal History Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Imperatives, Normativity, And The Law, Gregory Silverman Jan 1999

Imperatives, Normativity, And The Law, Gregory Silverman

Faculty Scholarship

In this article Professor Silverman sets out to resolve the problem of legal normativity. Professor Silverman argues that legal scholars have been prevented from transcending the limited conception of law engendered by a key dogma of nineteenth century jurisprudence: the dogma that laws are a species of commands, orders, or imperatives. As a result, even as we enter the twenty-first century, legal scholars have yet to articulate a legal architectonic that properly situates the normative commitments of a society within a post-modern legal system. An adequate theory of law must offer an account of the normativity of law: an account ...


No Vehicles In The Park, Pierre Schlag Jan 1999

No Vehicles In The Park, Pierre Schlag

Seattle University Law Review

This Article poses the question: what does the ordinance really mean? Trying to find out what the ordinance really means requires something that I will call "interpretation as retrieval." By this phrase, "interpretation as retrieval," I mean nothing terribly fancy. Interpretation as retrieval is the attempt to retrieve the meaning of an artifact or text-a meaning that is found in the artifact or text and that you, the interpreter, do not already have.


Understanding The Limits Of Power: Judicial Restraint In General Jurisdiction Court Systems, Justice Philip A. Talmadge Jan 1999

Understanding The Limits Of Power: Judicial Restraint In General Jurisdiction Court Systems, Justice Philip A. Talmadge

Seattle University Law Review

This Article draws on my legislative and judicial background to focus both on the tendency of the courts to exceed their core constitutional role and the implications of such judicial activism. This article contend that modern courts of general jurisdiction are too often embroiled in sociopolitical controversies best left to the political branches of government. Part I addresses the concept of judicial restraint in our constitutional system and the need to define the core powers of the judicial branch of government. Part II discusses principles of judicial restraint in the federal courts. Part III, using the example of Washington State ...