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Legal History Commons

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Articles 1 - 15 of 15

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Establishing New Legal Doctrine In Managed Care: A Model Of Judicial Response To Industrial Change, Peter D. Jacobson, Scott D. Pomfret Jul 1999

Establishing New Legal Doctrine In Managed Care: A Model Of Judicial Response To Industrial Change, Peter D. Jacobson, Scott D. Pomfret

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Courts are struggling with how to develop legal doctrine in challenges to the new managed care environment. In this Article, we examine how courts have responded in the past to new industries or radical transformations of existing industries. We analyze two historical antecedents, the emergence of railroads in the nineteenth century and mass production in the twentieth century, to explore how courts might react to the current transformation of the health care industry.

In doing so, we offer a model of how courts confront issues of developing legal doctrine, especially regarding liability, associated with nascent or dramatically transformed industries. Our ...


Unpublished Opinions: A Comment, Richard S. Arnold Jul 1999

Unpublished Opinions: A Comment, Richard S. Arnold

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

The Honorable Richard S. Arnold gives a federal appellate judge’s perspective of the unpublished opinions debate.


When Does The Curiae Need An Amicus?, Luther T. Munford Jul 1999

When Does The Curiae Need An Amicus?, Luther T. Munford

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

An argument is made for freely granting leave of amicus motions.


Discretionary Appellate Review Of Non-Final Orders: It’S Time To Change The Rules, Howard B. Eisenberg, Alan B. Morrison Jul 1999

Discretionary Appellate Review Of Non-Final Orders: It’S Time To Change The Rules, Howard B. Eisenberg, Alan B. Morrison

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

This article discusses the uncertainty of United States Courts of Appeals jurisdiction over non-final orders.


The Invalidity Of The Nez Perce Treaty Of 1863 And The Taking Of The Wallowa Valley, John K. Flanagan Jan 1999

The Invalidity Of The Nez Perce Treaty Of 1863 And The Taking Of The Wallowa Valley, John K. Flanagan

American Indian Law Review

No abstract provided.


Is The Excessive Fines Clause Excessively Kind To Money Launderers, Drug Dealers, And Tax Evaders, 33 J. Marshall L. Rev. 243 (1999), Ann Jennings Maron Jan 1999

Is The Excessive Fines Clause Excessively Kind To Money Launderers, Drug Dealers, And Tax Evaders, 33 J. Marshall L. Rev. 243 (1999), Ann Jennings Maron

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


What Spending Clause? - (Or The President's Paramour): An Examination Of The Views Of Hamilton, Madison, And Story On Article I, Section 8, Clause 1 Of The United States Constitution, 33 J. Marshall L. Rev. 81 (1999), Jeffrey T. Renz Jan 1999

What Spending Clause? - (Or The President's Paramour): An Examination Of The Views Of Hamilton, Madison, And Story On Article I, Section 8, Clause 1 Of The United States Constitution, 33 J. Marshall L. Rev. 81 (1999), Jeffrey T. Renz

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Chevron, Cooperative Federalism, And Telecommunications Reform, Philip J. Weiser Jan 1999

Chevron, Cooperative Federalism, And Telecommunications Reform, Philip J. Weiser

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Arkansas Supreme Court And The Civil War, L. Scott Stafford Jan 1999

The Arkansas Supreme Court And The Civil War, L. Scott Stafford

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


A Little Theory Is A Dangerous Thing: The Myth Of Adjudicative Retroactivity, Kermit Roosevelt Iii Jan 1999

A Little Theory Is A Dangerous Thing: The Myth Of Adjudicative Retroactivity, Kermit Roosevelt Iii

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Architecture Of Judicial Independence, Stephen B. Burbank Jan 1999

The Architecture Of Judicial Independence, Stephen B. Burbank

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Licensed To Steal: Has Sovereign Immunity Gone Too Far, 32 J. Marshall L. Rev. 779 (1999), Sulaiman M. Qazi Jan 1999

Licensed To Steal: Has Sovereign Immunity Gone Too Far, 32 J. Marshall L. Rev. 779 (1999), Sulaiman M. Qazi

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


When To Hear The Hearsay: A Proposal For A New Rule Of Evidence Designed To Protect The Constitutional Right Of The Criminally Accused To Confront The Witnesses Against Her, 32 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1287 (1999), Scott A. Smith Jan 1999

When To Hear The Hearsay: A Proposal For A New Rule Of Evidence Designed To Protect The Constitutional Right Of The Criminally Accused To Confront The Witnesses Against Her, 32 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1287 (1999), Scott A. Smith

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


From Webster To Word-Processing: The Ascendance Of The Appellate Brief, William H. Rehnquist Jan 1999

From Webster To Word-Processing: The Ascendance Of The Appellate Brief, William H. Rehnquist

The Journal of Appellate Practice and Process

Chief Justice William Rehnquist analyzed the evolution of Supreme Court advocacy. The discussion begins with the initial preference for oral arguments and the influence of nineteenth century Supreme Court advocate Daniel Webster. The discussion then turns to the Court’s shift from more attention to oral argument to written briefs.


Beyond The Hero Judge: Institutional Reform Litigation As Litigation, Margo Schlanger Jan 1999

Beyond The Hero Judge: Institutional Reform Litigation As Litigation, Margo Schlanger

Reviews

In 1955, in its second decision in Brown v. Board of Education, the Supreme Court suggested that federal courts might be called upon to engage in long-term oversight of once-segregated schools. Through the 1960s, southern resistance pushed federal district and appellate judges to turn that possibility into a reality. The impact of this saga on litigation practice extended beyond school desegregation, and even beyond the struggle for African-American equality; through implementation of Brown, the nation’s litigants, lawyers, and judges grew accustomed both to issuance of permanent injunctions against state and local public institutions, and to extended court oversight of ...