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Full-Text Articles in Legal History

The Riccobono Seminar Of Roman Law In America: The Lost Years, Timothy G. Kearley May 2018

The Riccobono Seminar Of Roman Law In America: The Lost Years, Timothy G. Kearley

Timothy G. Kearley

The Riccobono Seminar was the preeminent source of intellectual support for Romanists in the U.S. during the middle of the twentieth century. In the course of the Seminar's existence, many of the era's greatest Roman law scholars gave presentations at the Riccobono Seminar. The Seminar's history after it came under the aegis of the Catholic University of America in 1935 has been readily available, but not so for the earliest years of 1930-35, when it moved among several law schools in the District of Columbia. This paper uses archival information and newspaper articles to describe the ...


From Rome To The Restatement: S.P. Scott, Fred Blume, Clyde Pharr, And Roman Law In Early Twentieth Century America, Timothy G. Kearley Feb 2016

From Rome To The Restatement: S.P. Scott, Fred Blume, Clyde Pharr, And Roman Law In Early Twentieth Century America, Timothy G. Kearley

Timothy G. Kearley

This article describes how the classical past, including Roman law and a classics-based education, influenced elite legal culture in the United States and university-educated Americans into the twentieth century and helped to encourage Scott, Blume, and Pharr to labor for many years on their English translations of ancient Roman law. 


Wilhelm Kroll's Preface To Justinian's Novels: An English Translation, Timothy G. Kearley, David J.D. Miller Jul 2013

Wilhelm Kroll's Preface To Justinian's Novels: An English Translation, Timothy G. Kearley, David J.D. Miller

Timothy G. Kearley

Justice Frederick H. Blume, attorney and long-time Justice of the Wyoming Supreme Court, single-handedly translated Justinian's Code and Novels in the early twentieth century. His is the only English translation of the Code to have been made from the Latin version accepted as most authoritative. Using Blume's papers, this article describes, among other things: how Blume created the extensive Roman law library needed for his translation; his approach to translation; and his collaboration with Clyde Pharr on Pharr's "Corpus Juris Romani" series. The article also describes the author's editing and digitization of Justice Blume's translation.


Justice Fred Blume And The Translation Of Justinian's Code, Timothy G. Kearley Dec 2006

Justice Fred Blume And The Translation Of Justinian's Code, Timothy G. Kearley

Timothy G. Kearley

This article tells the story of Justice Fred Blume of the Wyoming Supreme Court, who singlehandedly created the only English translation of the Justinian Codex made from the authoritative Latin edition; it also describes the digitization of Justice Blume's annotated manuscript translation and its publication on the internet.