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Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Law, Violence, And The Neurotic Structure Of American Indian Law, Sarah Krakoff Jan 2014

Law, Violence, And The Neurotic Structure Of American Indian Law, Sarah Krakoff

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Last Indian Raid In Kansas: Context, Colonialism, And Philip P. Frickey's Contributions To American Indian Law, Sarah Krakoff Jan 2010

The Last Indian Raid In Kansas: Context, Colonialism, And Philip P. Frickey's Contributions To American Indian Law, Sarah Krakoff

Articles

To many, American Indian law is a remote and anomalous area of the law. To others, including Professor Phil Frickey, themes in American Indian law are central to our identity as a nation, and lessons from the field inform broader understandings of the competencies and limitations of the federal judiciary. One of Professor Frickey’s recurring scholarly arguments is that the federal courts are most within their areas of institutional competence when they approach contemporary Indian law questions as structural disputes between sovereigns, rather than as individual conflicts amenable to the application of mainstream public law values. An event described ...


The Salmon People, Judge Boldt, And The Rule Of Law, Charles F. Wilkinson Jan 2006

The Salmon People, Judge Boldt, And The Rule Of Law, Charles F. Wilkinson

Articles

No abstract provided.


National Identity And Liberalism In International Law: Three Models, Justin Desautels-Stein Jan 2005

National Identity And Liberalism In International Law: Three Models, Justin Desautels-Stein

Articles

No abstract provided.


Brief Of Lone Wolf, Principal Chief Of The Kiowas, To The Supreme Court Of The American Indian Nations, S. James Anaya Jan 1997

Brief Of Lone Wolf, Principal Chief Of The Kiowas, To The Supreme Court Of The American Indian Nations, S. James Anaya

Articles

No abstract provided.


Conquering The Cultural Frontier: The New Subjectivism Of The Supreme Court In Indian Law, David H. Getches Jan 1996

Conquering The Cultural Frontier: The New Subjectivism Of The Supreme Court In Indian Law, David H. Getches

Articles

For a century and a half, the Supreme Court was faithful to a set of foundation principles respecting Indian tribal sovereignty. Though the United States can abrogate tribal powers and rights, it can only do so by legislation. Accordingly, the Court has protected reservations as enclaves for Indian self-government, preventing states from enforcing their laws and taxes, and holding that even federal laws could not be applied to Indians without congressional permission. Recently, however, the Court has assumed the job it formerly conceded to Congress, considering and weighing cases to reach results comporting with the Justices' subjective notions of what ...


Indian Consent To American Government, Richard B. Collins Jan 1989

Indian Consent To American Government, Richard B. Collins

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Idea Of Sovereignty: Native Peoples, Their Lands, And Their Dreams, Charles F. Wilkinson Jan 1988

The Idea Of Sovereignty: Native Peoples, Their Lands, And Their Dreams, Charles F. Wilkinson

Articles

No abstract provided.


The Law Of The American West: A Critical Bibliography Of The Nonlegal Sources, Charles F. Wilkinson Jan 1987

The Law Of The American West: A Critical Bibliography Of The Nonlegal Sources, Charles F. Wilkinson

Articles

No abstract provided.


Indian Allotment Water Rights, Richard B. Collins Jan 1985

Indian Allotment Water Rights, Richard B. Collins

Articles

Allotted tribal lands create troublesome questions for western water lawyers. In this article the author reviews the history of basic Indian reservation water rights created by the Supreme Court's landmark decision in Winters v. United States. He then explains the disposition of those rights when reservation lands are allotted. Finally, he discusses the difficult issues that arise when allotted lands pass from the federal trust become subject to state law, and are transferred to non-Indians.


Can An Indian Tribe Recover Land Illegally Taken In The Seventeenth Century?, Richard B. Collins Jan 1985

Can An Indian Tribe Recover Land Illegally Taken In The Seventeenth Century?, Richard B. Collins

Articles

No abstract provided.


Book Review, David Getches Jan 1971

Book Review, David Getches

Articles

No abstract provided.