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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

The Little Rock Crisis And Foreign Affairs: Race, Resistance, And The Image Of American Democracy, Mary L. Dudziak Sep 1997

The Little Rock Crisis And Foreign Affairs: Race, Resistance, And The Image Of American Democracy, Mary L. Dudziak

Mary L. Dudziak

When President Dwight D. Eisenhower sent federal troops to Little Rock, Arkansas to enforce a school desegregation order at Central High School in the fall of 1957, more than racial equality was at issue. The image of American democracy was at stake. The Little Rock crisis played out on a world stage, as news media around the world covered the crisis. During the weeks of impasse leading up to Eisenhower's dramatic intervention, foreign critics questioned how the United States could argue that its democratic system of government was a model for others to follow when racial segregation was tolerated ...


Parental Law, Harmful Speech, And The Development Of Legal Culture: Russian Judicial Chamber Discourse And Narrative, Frances H. Foster Jun 1997

Parental Law, Harmful Speech, And The Development Of Legal Culture: Russian Judicial Chamber Discourse And Narrative, Frances H. Foster

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


Immigration Policy, Liberal Principles, And The Republican Tradition, Howard F. Chang Jan 1997

Immigration Policy, Liberal Principles, And The Republican Tradition, Howard F. Chang

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Transracial Adoption (Tra): Old Prejudices And Discrimination Float Under A New Halo, Ruth-Arlene W. Howe Jan 1997

Transracial Adoption (Tra): Old Prejudices And Discrimination Float Under A New Halo, Ruth-Arlene W. Howe

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

The primary aim of this article is to place the late twentieth century Transracial Adoption (TRA) of African-American children accurately within the context of the child welfare system milieu out of which it emerged. It also endeavors to provide thoughtful scholars and child advocates a new lens with which to assess the past purpose, function, and efficacy of TRA. The author hopes that through these considerations more careful regulation and monitoring of future TRA placements will emerge, which will both protect the interests of the African-American adoptee and respect the African-American community.