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Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

The Limits Of Quantitative Legal Analyses: Chaos In Legal Scholarship And Fdic V. W.R. Grace & Co., Royce De R. Barondes Oct 1995

The Limits Of Quantitative Legal Analyses: Chaos In Legal Scholarship And Fdic V. W.R. Grace & Co., Royce De R. Barondes

Faculty Publications

This Article identifies a few of those techniques by examining a number of quasi-quantitative legal analyses that have addressed a range of legal relationships. The methodology of this Article consists of reviewing the relationship between those legal analyses and their associated non-legal disciplines. The unifying theme of the discussed examples is that a useful, well constructed quantitative analysis or approach has been improperly extended into a legal context.


Reflections On From Slaves To Citizens Bondage, Freedom And The Constitution: The New Slavery Scholarship And Its Impact On Law And Legal Historiography, Robert J. Kaczorowski Jan 1995

Reflections On From Slaves To Citizens Bondage, Freedom And The Constitution: The New Slavery Scholarship And Its Impact On Law And Legal Historiography, Robert J. Kaczorowski

Faculty Scholarship

The thesis of Professor Donald Nieman's paper, "From Slaves to Citizens: African-Americans, Rights Consciousness, and Reconstruction," is that the nation experienced a revolution in the United States Constitution and in the consciousness of African Americans. According to Professor Nieman, the Reconstruction Amendments represented "a dramatic departure from antebellum constitutional principles,"' because the Thirteenth Amendment reversed the pre-Civil War constitutional guarantee of slavery and "abolish[ed] slavery by federal authority." The Fourteenth Amendment rejected the Supreme Court's "racially-based definition of citizenship [in Dred Scott v. Sandford4], clearly establishing a color-blind citizenship” and the Fifteenth Amendment "wrote the principle of ...


Comparative Jurisprudence (I): What Was It Like To Try A Rat?, William B. Ewald Jan 1995

Comparative Jurisprudence (I): What Was It Like To Try A Rat?, William B. Ewald

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.