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Articles 1 - 21 of 21

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

'Dred Scott V. Sandford' Analysis, Sarah E. Roessler Nov 2013

'Dred Scott V. Sandford' Analysis, Sarah E. Roessler

Student Publications

The Scott v. Sandford decision will forever be known as a dark moment in America's history. The Supreme Court chose to rule on a controversial issue, and they made the wrong decision. Scott v. Sandford is an example of what can happen when the Court chooses to side with personal opinion instead of what is right.


Coase, Herbert J. Hovenkamp Oct 2013

Coase, Herbert J. Hovenkamp

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

This brief essay considers the career, contributions, and influence of Ronald Coase, who passed away in September, 2013. Comments are welcome.


The Michael H. Hoeflich Collection Of Roman Law Books - Spring 2013: An Illustrated Guide To The Exhibit, Laurel Davis Apr 2013

The Michael H. Hoeflich Collection Of Roman Law Books - Spring 2013: An Illustrated Guide To The Exhibit, Laurel Davis

Rare Book Room Exhibition Programs

Exhibition program from a Spring 2013 exhibit presented in the Daniel R. Coquillette Rare Book Room at the Boston College Law Library. The exhibition featured books on the subject of Roman law donated to the Boston College Law Library by Michael H. Hoeflich. This exhibit was the second of two on this topic.


125 Years Of Law Books, 1888-2013, Keith Ann Stiverson Feb 2013

125 Years Of Law Books, 1888-2013, Keith Ann Stiverson

125th Anniversary Materials

No abstract provided.


A "Progressive Contraction Of Jurisdiction": The Making Of The Modern Supreme Court, Carolyn Shapiro Feb 2013

A "Progressive Contraction Of Jurisdiction": The Making Of The Modern Supreme Court, Carolyn Shapiro

125th Anniversary Materials

The Supreme Court in 1888 was in crisis. Its overall structure and responsibilities, created a century earlier by the Judiciary Act of 1789, were no longer adequate or appropriate. The Court had no control over its own docket - at the beginning of the 1888 term, there were 1,563 cases pending - and the justices’ responsibilities, which included circuit riding, were impossible to meet. Shaped as it was by a law almost as old as the country itself, the Supreme Court in 1888 - and the federal judicial system as a whole - would be barely recognizable to many today.

This chapter - which ...


Privacy And Technology: A 125-Year Review, Lori B. Andrews Feb 2013

Privacy And Technology: A 125-Year Review, Lori B. Andrews

125th Anniversary Materials

No abstract provided.


The Changing Composition Of The American Jury, Nancy S. Marder Feb 2013

The Changing Composition Of The American Jury, Nancy S. Marder

125th Anniversary Materials

No abstract provided.


John Montgomery Ward: The Lawyer Who Took On Baseball, Christopher W. Schmidt Feb 2013

John Montgomery Ward: The Lawyer Who Took On Baseball, Christopher W. Schmidt

125th Anniversary Materials

No abstract provided.


What's A Telegram?, Henry H. Perritt Jr. Feb 2013

What's A Telegram?, Henry H. Perritt Jr.

125th Anniversary Materials

No abstract provided.


Chicago-Kent: 125 Years And Counting, Ralph L. Brill Feb 2013

Chicago-Kent: 125 Years And Counting, Ralph L. Brill

125th Anniversary Materials

No abstract provided.


U.S. Antitrust: From Shot In The Dark To Global Leadership, David J. Gerber Feb 2013

U.S. Antitrust: From Shot In The Dark To Global Leadership, David J. Gerber

125th Anniversary Materials

No abstract provided.


The Rookery Building And Chicago-Kent, A. Dan Tarlock Feb 2013

The Rookery Building And Chicago-Kent, A. Dan Tarlock

125th Anniversary Materials

No abstract provided.


Chicago's "Great Boodle Trial", Todd Haugh Feb 2013

Chicago's "Great Boodle Trial", Todd Haugh

125th Anniversary Materials

No abstract provided.


Then & Now: Stories Of Law And Progress, Lori B. Andrews, Sarah K. Harding Feb 2013

Then & Now: Stories Of Law And Progress, Lori B. Andrews, Sarah K. Harding

125th Anniversary Materials

No abstract provided.


Criminal Procedure And The Supreme Court - Then And Now, David Rudstein Feb 2013

Criminal Procedure And The Supreme Court - Then And Now, David Rudstein

125th Anniversary Materials

No abstract provided.


Inventing Legal Aid: Women And Lay Lawyering, Felice Batlan Feb 2013

Inventing Legal Aid: Women And Lay Lawyering, Felice Batlan

125th Anniversary Materials

No abstract provided.


The Legacy Of In Re Neagle, Harold J. Krent Feb 2013

The Legacy Of In Re Neagle, Harold J. Krent

125th Anniversary Materials

No abstract provided.


Founding-Era Conventions And The Meaning Of The Constitution’S “Convention For Proposing Amendments”, Robert G. Natelson Jan 2013

Founding-Era Conventions And The Meaning Of The Constitution’S “Convention For Proposing Amendments”, Robert G. Natelson

Robert G. Natelson

Under Article V of the U.S. Constitution, two thirds of state legislatures may require Congress to call a “Convention for proposing Amendments.” Because this procedure has never been used, commentators frequently debate the composition of the convention and the rules governing the application and convention process. However, the debate has proceeded almost entirely without knowledge of the many multi-colony and multi-state conventions held during the eighteenth century, of which the Constitutional Convention was only one. These conventions were governed by universally-accepted convention practices and protocols. This Article surveys those conventions and shows how their practices and protocols shaped the ...


On What Distinguishes New Originalism From Old: A Jurisprudential Take, Mitchell N. Berman Jan 2013

On What Distinguishes New Originalism From Old: A Jurisprudential Take, Mitchell N. Berman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Memory Of A Racist Past — Yazoo: Integration In A Deep-Southern Town By Willie Morris, Nick J. Sciullo Dec 2012

Memory Of A Racist Past — Yazoo: Integration In A Deep-Southern Town By Willie Morris, Nick J. Sciullo

Nick J. Sciullo

Willie Morris was in many ways larger than life. Born in Jackson, Mississippi, he moved with his family to Yazoo City, Mississippi at the age of six months. He attended and graduated from the University of Texas at Austin where his scathing editorials against racism in the South earned him the hatred of university officials. After graduation, he attended Oxford University on a Rhodes scholarship. He would join Harper’s Magazine in 1963, rising to become the youngest editor-in-chief in the magazine’s history. He remained at this post until 1971 when he resigned amid dropping ad sales and a ...


Founding Era Conventions And The Constitution's "Convention For Proposing Amendments", Robert G. Natelson Dec 2012

Founding Era Conventions And The Constitution's "Convention For Proposing Amendments", Robert G. Natelson

Robert G. Natelson

Under Article V of the U.S. Constitution, two thirds of state legislatures may require Congress to call a “Convention for proposing Amendments.” Because this procedure has never been used, commentators frequently debate the composition of the convention and the rules governing the application and convention process. However, the debate has proceeded almost entirely without knowledge of the many multi-colony and multi-state conventions held during the eighteenth century, of which the Constitutional Convention was only one. These conventions were governed by universally-accepted convention practices and protocols. This Article surveys those conventions and shows how their practices and protocols shaped the ...