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You Say You Want A (Nonviolent) Revolution, Well Then What? Translating Western Thought, Strategic Ideological Cooptation, And Institution Building For Freedom For Governments Emerging Out Of Peaceful Chaos, Donald J. Kochan Mar 2012

You Say You Want A (Nonviolent) Revolution, Well Then What? Translating Western Thought, Strategic Ideological Cooptation, And Institution Building For Freedom For Governments Emerging Out Of Peaceful Chaos, Donald J. Kochan

Donald J. Kochan

With nonviolent revolution in particular, displaced governments leave a power and governance vacuum waiting to be filled. Such vacuums are particularly susceptible to what this Article will call “strategic ideological cooptation.” Following the regime disruption, peaceful chaos transitions into a period in which it is necessary to structure and order the emergent governance scheme. That period in which the new government scheme emerges is particularly fraught with danger when growing from peaceful chaos because nonviolent revolutions tend to be decentralized, unorganized, unsophisticated, and particularly vulnerable to cooptation. Any external power wishing to influence events in societies emerging out of peaceful ...


Neutrality, Edwin Borchard Jan 1938

Neutrality, Edwin Borchard

Faculty Scholarship Series

Before 1914, it was hard to find much difference of opinion among American citizens about the proper policy of the United States in relation to foreign wars or even foreign affairs. That policy, with respect to Europe, was dictated by geographical factors and by a colonial and continental history that left little room for debate. Detachment from Europe's political entanglements, non-intervention in its internal affairs, and neutrality in its wars were the keynotes. After 1898 the acquisition of Asiatic possessions turned America to a Pacific orientation marked by uncertainty and the assumption of unnecessary risks. The desire to play ...