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Jurisprudence

2003

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Articles 1 - 30 of 34

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

In Defense Of Chief Justice Roy S. Moore, Jeffrey C. Tuomala Oct 2003

In Defense Of Chief Justice Roy S. Moore, Jeffrey C. Tuomala

Faculty Publications and Presentations

No abstract provided.


In Defense Of Chief Justice Roy S. Moore, Jeffrey C. Tuomala Oct 2003

In Defense Of Chief Justice Roy S. Moore, Jeffrey C. Tuomala

Jeffrey C. Tuomala

No abstract provided.


The Symbols Of Governance: Thurman Arnold And Post-Realist Legal Theory, Mark Fenster Oct 2003

The Symbols Of Governance: Thurman Arnold And Post-Realist Legal Theory, Mark Fenster

UF Law Faculty Publications

This article is an effort to provide both the intellectual context of Thurman Arnold's work and, through his work, a better sense of where and how the study of law turned after realism. The article is in five parts. Part I describes Arnold's relationship with legal realism, looking at the earliest part of his academic career when, as a mainstream realist, he performed empirical studies of local and state court systems. Part II is Arnold's proposed field of "Political Dynamics," an interdisciplinary approach to the symbols of law, politics, and economics. Part III considers Arnold's authorial ...


Whose Music Is It Anyway?: How We Came To View Musical Expression As A Form Of Property -- Part I, Michael W. Carroll Sep 2003

Whose Music Is It Anyway?: How We Came To View Musical Expression As A Form Of Property -- Part I, Michael W. Carroll

Working Paper Series

Many participants in the music industry consider unauthorized downloading of music files over the Internet to be “theft” of their “property.” Many Internet users who exchange music files reject that characterization. Prompted by this dispute, this Article explores how those who create and distribute music first came to look upon music as their property and when in Western history the law first supported this view. By analyzing the economic and legal structures governing musicmaking in Western Europe from the classical period in Greece through the Renaissance, the Article shows that the law first granted some exclusive rights in the Middle ...


The Perils Of "Consensus": Hans Kelsen And The Legal Philosophy Of The United Nations, J. Peter Pham Aug 2003

The Perils Of "Consensus": Hans Kelsen And The Legal Philosophy Of The United Nations, J. Peter Pham

ExpressO

Recently the United States and a number of its traditional allies have clashed over a variety of foreign policy issues that are profoundly juridical: the authority for war and peace, the International Criminal Court, etc. The source of these recent tensions is to be located at a level deeper than that of narrow national interests and specific policies. Rather, they arise from significant differences concerning the nature of "consensus" and, ultimately, legal philosophy. While the United Nations and many other international organizations derive their legal visions from the philosophy of law of Hans Kelsen (1881-1973), one of the most important ...


Factless Jurisprudence, Darren Lenard Hutchinson Jul 2003

Factless Jurisprudence, Darren Lenard Hutchinson

UF Law Faculty Publications

Professor Terry Smith has written a very important work on the inadequacy of juridical approaches to antidiscrimination law in the context of Title VII litigation. Smith argues that the anti-retaliation provisions of Title VII can serve more broadly as a mechanism for protecting workers of color from prohibited racial discrimination. Smith contends that contemporary equality jurisprudence, however, impedes the protective scope of the anti-retaliation provision because courts fail to appreciate the broader context of racial antagonism in which persons of color live. Particularly, courts often misinterpret lawful racial protest in the workplace as disruptive and appropriately regulated to the detriment ...


Memorandum Of Argument, Supreme Court Of Canada, In Re James R. Demers, Jeffrey C. Tuomala May 2003

Memorandum Of Argument, Supreme Court Of Canada, In Re James R. Demers, Jeffrey C. Tuomala

Faculty Publications and Presentations

No abstract provided.


Memorandum Of Argument, Supreme Court Of Canada, In Re James R. Demers, Jeffrey C. Tuomala May 2003

Memorandum Of Argument, Supreme Court Of Canada, In Re James R. Demers, Jeffrey C. Tuomala

Jeffrey C. Tuomala

No abstract provided.


Manual De Derecho Procesal Civil, Edward Ivan Cueva Feb 2003

Manual De Derecho Procesal Civil, Edward Ivan Cueva

Edward Ivan Cueva

No abstract provided.


Thinking Like A Lawyer, Jeffrey C. Tuomala Feb 2003

Thinking Like A Lawyer, Jeffrey C. Tuomala

Faculty Publications and Presentations

No abstract provided.


Thinking Like A Lawyer, Jeffrey C. Tuomala Feb 2003

Thinking Like A Lawyer, Jeffrey C. Tuomala

Jeffrey C. Tuomala

No abstract provided.


Science, Identity, And The Construction Of The Gay Political Narrative, Nancy J. Knauer Jan 2003

Science, Identity, And The Construction Of The Gay Political Narrative, Nancy J. Knauer

Nancy J. Knauer

This Article contends that the current debate over gay civil rights is, at base, a dispute over the nature of same-sex desire. Pro-gay forces advocate an ethnic or identity model of homosexuality based on the conviction that sexual orientation is an immutable, unchosen, and benign characteristic. The assertion that, in essence, gays are "born that way," has produced a gay political narrative that rests on claims of shared identity (i.e., homosexuals are a blameless minority) and arguments of equivalence (i.e., as a blameless minority, homosexuals deserve equal treatment and protection against discrimination). The pro-family counter-narrative is based on ...


Two Conceptions Of Relevance, Jonathan Yovel Jan 2003

Two Conceptions Of Relevance, Jonathan Yovel

Jonathan Yovel

Courts use complex modes of relevance judgments in regulating the introduction of information and construction of factual narratives; likewise, common law works both through and around relevance presuppositions in determining doctrine. This study examines different functions of relevance - conceived as different conceptions, at times competing, at times interdependent. The distinctions between these conceptions are arranged on three levels: 1) a normative/"causal" level, arguing for the status of relevance as a requirement for a "meaning-based" conception of entailment and drawing on discussions from relevance logic (RL) and modal logic; 2) a pragmatic/metapragmatic level that explores the ways in which ...


Marbury V. Madison And Modern Judicial Review, Robert F. Nagel Jan 2003

Marbury V. Madison And Modern Judicial Review, Robert F. Nagel

Articles

This Article compares the realist critique of Marbury with several revisionist defenses of that decision. Realists claim to see Marbury as essentially political and thus as the fountainhead of modern judicial review. Revisionists claim to see the decision as legalistically justified and thus inconsistent with current practices. Close examination, however, indicates that, despite sharp rhetorical differences, these two accounts are largely complementary rather than inconsistent. Each envisions Marbury as embodying elements of both political realism and legal formalism. Once the false argument about whether Marbury was either political or legal is put aside, it is possible to trace the influence ...


Justification And Excuse, Law And Morality, Mitchell N. Berman Jan 2003

Justification And Excuse, Law And Morality, Mitchell N. Berman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Anglo-American theorists of the criminal law have concentrated on-one is tempted to say "obsessed over"-the distinction between justification and excuse for a good quarter-century and the scholarly attention has purchased unusually widespread agreement. Justification defenses are said to apply when the actor's conduct was not morally wrongful; excuse defenses lie when the actor did engage in wrongful conduct but is not morally blameworthy. A near consensus thus achieved, theorists have turned to subordinate matters, joining issue most notably on the question of whether justifications are "subjective"-turning upon the actor's reasons for acting-or "objective"-involving only facts ...


What Do We Mean By "Judicial Independence"?, Stephen B. Burbank Jan 2003

What Do We Mean By "Judicial Independence"?, Stephen B. Burbank

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

In this article, the author argues that the concept of "judicial independence" has served more as an object of rhetoric than it has of sustained study. He views the scholarly literatures that treat it as ships passing in the night, each subject to weaknesses that reflect the needs and fashions of the discipline, but all tending to ignore courts other than the Supreme Court of the United States. Seeking both greater rigor and greater flexibility than one usually finds in public policy debates about, and in the legal and political science literatures on, judicial independence, the author attributes much of ...


The Creativity Of The Common-Law Judge: The Jurisprudence Of William Mitchell, Charles J. Reid Jr. Jan 2003

The Creativity Of The Common-Law Judge: The Jurisprudence Of William Mitchell, Charles J. Reid Jr.

William Mitchell Law Review

Mitchell's presence graced the Minnesota Supreme Court for nearly nineteen years, from 1881 to 1900. His output was prodigious. He produced nearly 1600 judicial opinions. It has been estimated “that excluding Sundays, and allowing a month in each year for vacation, Judge Mitchell wrote one opinion in every three days for nineteen years.” Indeed, “[i]n point of numbers, his opinions exceed those of any other justice of the Supreme Court of his state, or the nation.” It is one aspect, perhaps the central aspect, the unifying theme of this prolific body of work, that is the focus of ...


Negotiating The Jurisprudential Terrain: A Model Theoretic Approach To Legal Theory, Christopher Roederer Jan 2003

Negotiating The Jurisprudential Terrain: A Model Theoretic Approach To Legal Theory, Christopher Roederer

Seattle University Law Review

This paper explores borrowing a meta-theoretical approach to theory from the natural and social sciences in order to provide a framework within which to situate and evaluate the various theories one encounters in the field of law and jurisprudence. Often it is the case that students of jurisprudence go from one school or theory to another with one of three responses: (1) this makes no sense to me; (2) this makes some sense, but what is the point or relevance; or (3) this makes sense and seems true, but so do many of the schools, theories, and theorists we have ...


A Brief History Of Gender Law Journals: The Heritage Of Myra Bradwell's Chicago Legal News, Richard H. Chused Jan 2003

A Brief History Of Gender Law Journals: The Heritage Of Myra Bradwell's Chicago Legal News, Richard H. Chused

Articles & Chapters

No abstract provided.


A Future Foretold: Neo-Aristotelian Praise Of Postmodern Legal Theory, Francis J. Mootz Iii Jan 2003

A Future Foretold: Neo-Aristotelian Praise Of Postmodern Legal Theory, Francis J. Mootz Iii

McGeorge School of Law Scholarly Articles

No abstract provided.


Multiple Ironies: Brown At 50, Ronald S. Sullivan Jr. Jan 2003

Multiple Ironies: Brown At 50, Ronald S. Sullivan Jr.

Faculty Scholarship Series

Brown v. Board of Education occupies a vaunted space in American
jurisprudence. One commentator writes that Brown is the most
celebrated case in the Court's history. Equally laudatory, another
commentator remarks: "In the half century since the Supreme Court's
decision, Brown has become a beloved legal and political icon." A
third proclaims that, "Brown forever changed the role of the United States Supreme Court in American politics and society." To the lay
public, Brown sits among a small pantheon of cases that is widely recognizable
to the average American.' Miranda and Roe v. Wade
likely are the only ...


Regionalization Of International Criminal Law Enforcement: A Preliminary Exploration, William W. Burke-White Jan 2003

Regionalization Of International Criminal Law Enforcement: A Preliminary Exploration, William W. Burke-White

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Harm, History, And Counterfactuals, Stephen R. Perry Jan 2003

Harm, History, And Counterfactuals, Stephen R. Perry

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Innocence Revolution And Our "Evolving Standards Of Decency" In Death Penalty Jurisprudence, Mark A. Godsey, Thomas Pulley Jan 2003

The Innocence Revolution And Our "Evolving Standards Of Decency" In Death Penalty Jurisprudence, Mark A. Godsey, Thomas Pulley

Faculty Articles and Other Publications

One cannot adequately consider whether the current administration of the death penalty in America measures up to modern notions of decency without doing so in light of the revolution that has occurred over the past decade in the American criminal-justice system - the Innocence Revolution. Up through the 1990s, as a society, we believed our criminal-justice system was highly accurate, but the recent advent of DNA testing and other advanced technologies has demonstrated the naiveté of such beliefs. This article will discuss the history of the Innocence Revolution, examine the impact of that revolution on our society, and ask: "What should ...


Holmes On Natural Law, Robert P. George Jan 2003

Holmes On Natural Law, Robert P. George

Villanova Law Review

No abstract provided.


Traditional Equity And Contemporary Procedure, Thomas O. Main Jan 2003

Traditional Equity And Contemporary Procedure, Thomas O. Main

Scholarly Works

This Article offers extensive background on the development and eventual merger of the regimes of law and equity, and suggests that the procedural infrastructure of a unified system must be sufficiently elastic to accommodate the traditional jurisdiction of equity. As the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure become increasingly more elaborate and technical, strict application of those procedural rules can generate mischievous results and hardship. This Article suggests that equity remains a source of authority for district judges to avoid the application of a procedural rule when technical compliance would produce an inequitable result. A separate system of equity provided a ...


Re-Imagining Justice, Robin West Jan 2003

Re-Imagining Justice, Robin West

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

What do we mean by legal justice, as opposed to distributive, or social, or political justice; what is the justice, that is, we hope law promotes? What is the justice that lawyers and judges, peculiarly, are professionally committed to pursue? What is the virtue around which, arguably, this profession, and the individuals within it, have defined their public lives?

Justice -- and more particularly legal justice -- is a badly under-theorized topic in jurisprudence; perhaps surprisingly, there is little written on it. The paucity of writing of course has a history. It can be traced to the turn of the last century ...


Philosophy And Opinions, Warren Ortland Jan 2003

Philosophy And Opinions, Warren Ortland

William Mitchell Law Review

Review of Law, Pragmatism, and Democracy. By Richard A. Posner. Harvard University Press, 2003. 398 Pages. $35.00.


The Implications Of Transition Theory For Stare Decisis, Jill E. Fisch Jan 2003

The Implications Of Transition Theory For Stare Decisis, Jill E. Fisch

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Freedom Of Discrimination?:The Conflict Between Public Accommodations' Freedom Association And State Anti-Discrimination Laws, 37 J. Marshall L. Rev. 125 (2003), Gregory J. Wartman Jan 2003

Freedom Of Discrimination?:The Conflict Between Public Accommodations' Freedom Association And State Anti-Discrimination Laws, 37 J. Marshall L. Rev. 125 (2003), Gregory J. Wartman

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.