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Constitutional Law

1987

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Articles 1 - 21 of 21

Full-Text Articles in Legal History

Means, Ends And Original Intent: A Response To Charles Cooper, Michael Wells Jul 1987

Means, Ends And Original Intent: A Response To Charles Cooper, Michael Wells

Scholarly Works

Charles Cooper believes that the ninth amendment should be read at once more broadly and more narrowly than it is today. In his view, the intent of the Framers was to cabin the power of the federal government. By taking note in the ninth amendment of rights other than those enumerated in the first eight, they sought to ensure that the national government would not exercise powers beyond those listed in the Constitution. Since the aim of the ninth amendment was to keep the federal government one of limited power, it is inappropriate to apply the amendment to the states ...


No State Shall Abridge: The Fourteenth Amendment And The Bill Of Rights, Mark A. Grannis May 1987

No State Shall Abridge: The Fourteenth Amendment And The Bill Of Rights, Mark A. Grannis

Michigan Law Review

A Review of No State Shall Abridge: The Fourteenth Amendment and the Bill of Rights by Michael Kent Curtis


Toleration And The Constitution, Judith L. Hudson May 1987

Toleration And The Constitution, Judith L. Hudson

Michigan Law Review

A Review of Toleration and the Constitution by David A.J. Richards


The Rise Of Modern Judicial Review: From Constitutional Interpretation To Judge-Made Law, Ward A. Greenberg May 1987

The Rise Of Modern Judicial Review: From Constitutional Interpretation To Judge-Made Law, Ward A. Greenberg

Michigan Law Review

A Review of The Rise of Modern Judicial Review: From Constitutional Interpretation to Judge-Made Law by Christopher Wolfe


Constitutional Politics: Affirmative Action And Supreme Process, Albert Broderick Apr 1987

Constitutional Politics: Affirmative Action And Supreme Process, Albert Broderick

North Carolina Central Law Review

No abstract provided.


Professor Harry V. Jaffa Divides The House: A Respectful Protest And A Defense Brief, Robert L. Stone Jan 1987

Professor Harry V. Jaffa Divides The House: A Respectful Protest And A Defense Brief, Robert L. Stone

Seattle University Law Review

This Article replies to Professor’ Jaffa’s article, “What Were the ‘Original Intentions’ of the Framers of the Constitution of the United States?,” and book, The Crisis of the House Divided. The Article argues that Professor Jaffa’s method throughout his indictment of legal scholars has three flaws. First, the Article argues that Professor Jaffa takes statements of sensible political compromises-such as support for judicial restraint, British traditions, and local self-government-and treats them as if they were philosophical statements. Second, the author contends that Professor Jaffa assembles a composite indictment, which in law is appropriately applied only to an indictment ...


Seven Questions For Professor Jaffa, George Anastaplo Jan 1987

Seven Questions For Professor Jaffa, George Anastaplo

Seattle University Law Review

This Article poses questions inspired by the four essays collected in Professor Harry V. Jaffa’s article “What Were the ‘Original Intentions’ of the Framers of the Constitution of the United States?” The Article offers, in addition to fresh reflections upon these questions, three appendices, which bear upon various matters touched upon by Professor Jaffa. These appendices include, “The Founders of Our Founders: Jerusalem, Athens, and the American Constitution,” “The Ambiguity of Justice in Plato’s Republic,” and “Private Rights and Public Law: The Founders’ Perspective.” The Epilogue provides informed observations of a scholar who comments on the differences between ...


What Were The "Original Intentions" Of The Framers Of The Constitution Of The United States?, Harry V. Jaffa Jan 1987

What Were The "Original Intentions" Of The Framers Of The Constitution Of The United States?, Harry V. Jaffa

Seattle University Law Review

This Article explains how the doctrine of original intent might be defended as the basis for interpreting the Constitution. The deepest political differences in American history have always been differences concerning the meaning of the Constitution, whether as originally intended, or as amended. Since the Civil War, the debate has often taken the form of a dispute over whether or not the Civil War amendments, notably the fourteenth, have changed the way in which the whole Constitution, and not only the amended parts, is read or interpreted. It is not possible to even discuss how or whether the Civil War ...


Foreword: On Jaffa, Lincoln, Marshall, And Original Intent, Lewis E. Lehrman Jan 1987

Foreword: On Jaffa, Lincoln, Marshall, And Original Intent, Lewis E. Lehrman

Seattle University Law Review

This Foreword introduces the article to follow written by Harry V. Jaffa, scholar of Abraham Lincoln’s political philosophy. The Foreward provides background material necessary to contextualize the ongoing debate surrounding constitutional interpretation emphasizing original intent addressed in Jaffa's article.


Judicial Conscience And Natural Rights: A Reply To Professor Jaffa, Bruce Ledewitz Jan 1987

Judicial Conscience And Natural Rights: A Reply To Professor Jaffa, Bruce Ledewitz

Seattle University Law Review

This Article replies to Professor Harry V. Jaffa’s article “What Were the ‘Original Intentions’ of the Framers of the Constitution of the United States?” The Article focuses on the gap the author argues Professor Jaffa left between the consciousness of the Framers and the practice of judicial review today. The author argues that the understanding that Professor Jaffa brings to the intent of the Framers is one that opens up the Constitution to the call of justice, but the author critiques the utility of Professor Jaffa’s work in resolving the contentious constitutional issues of today, including abortion and ...


Law And The Experience Of Politics In Late Eighteenth-Century North Carolina: North Carolina Considers The Constitution, Walter F. Pratt Jan 1987

Law And The Experience Of Politics In Late Eighteenth-Century North Carolina: North Carolina Considers The Constitution, Walter F. Pratt

Journal Articles

No abstract provided.


Alternative Career Resolution: An Essay On The Removal Of Federal Judges, Stephen B. Burbank Jan 1987

Alternative Career Resolution: An Essay On The Removal Of Federal Judges, Stephen B. Burbank

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Taking Liberties: Privacy, Private Choice, And Social Contract Theory, Anita L. Allen Jan 1987

Taking Liberties: Privacy, Private Choice, And Social Contract Theory, Anita L. Allen

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Releases, Redress And Police Misconduct: Reflections On Agreements To Waive Civil Rights Actions In Exchange For Dismissal Of Criminal Charges, Seth F. Kreimer Jan 1987

Releases, Redress And Police Misconduct: Reflections On Agreements To Waive Civil Rights Actions In Exchange For Dismissal Of Criminal Charges, Seth F. Kreimer

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


The Illegality Of The Constitution, Richard Kay Jan 1987

The Illegality Of The Constitution, Richard Kay

Faculty Articles and Papers

No abstract provided.


Adjudication Is Not Interpretation: Some Reservations About The Law-As-Literature Movement, Robin West Jan 1987

Adjudication Is Not Interpretation: Some Reservations About The Law-As-Literature Movement, Robin West

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Among other achievements, the modern law-as-literature movement has prompted increasing numbers of legal scholars to embrace the claim that adjudication is interpretation, and more specifically, that constitutional adjudication is interpretation of the Constitution. That adjudication is interpretation -- that an adjudicative act is an interpretive act -- more than any other central commitment, unifies the otherwise diverse strands of the legal and constitutional theory of the late twentieth century.

In this article, I will argue in this article against both modern forms of interpretivism. The analogue of law to literature, on which much of modern interpretivism is based, although fruitful, has carried ...


Will The Constitution Survive Into The Twenty-First Century - Some Reflections On The Bicentennial Of The United States Constitution, 21 J. Marshall L. Rev. 79 (1987), Michael P. Seng Jan 1987

Will The Constitution Survive Into The Twenty-First Century - Some Reflections On The Bicentennial Of The United States Constitution, 21 J. Marshall L. Rev. 79 (1987), Michael P. Seng

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


On The Constitutional Status Of The Administrative Agencies, Harold H. Bruff Jan 1987

On The Constitutional Status Of The Administrative Agencies, Harold H. Bruff

Articles

No abstract provided.


American Indians And The Bicentennial, Richard B. Collins Jan 1987

American Indians And The Bicentennial, Richard B. Collins

Articles

No abstract provided.


Notes On A Bicentennial Constitution: Part Ii, Antinomial Choices And The Role Of The Supreme Court, William W. Van Alstyne Jan 1987

Notes On A Bicentennial Constitution: Part Ii, Antinomial Choices And The Role Of The Supreme Court, William W. Van Alstyne

Faculty Publications

Continuing the examination of judicial review conducted around the Constitution’s bicentennial, this article lays bare the inconsistencies in the expected tasks of the Supreme Court. Where some roles of the Court have traditionally been treated as indivisible, examining those same roles separate from one another produces an incoherent view of the Court that is difficult to compromise.


Standing In The Need Of Prayer? The Supreme Court On James Madison And Religious Liberty, Jonathan K. Van Patten Dec 1986

Standing In The Need Of Prayer? The Supreme Court On James Madison And Religious Liberty, Jonathan K. Van Patten

Jonathan Van Patten

No abstract provided.