Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Legal Education Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

International Law

Institution
Keyword
Publication Year
Publication
Publication Type
File Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 273

Full-Text Articles in Legal Education

Volume 1, Issue 1.1 Aug 2017

Volume 1, Issue 1.1

International Journal on Responsibility

Contents:

1 – 4 Terry Beitzel, Who is Responsible to do what for Whom? A letter from the Editor-in-Chief.

5 – 20 Arun Gandhi, What Does Responsibility Mean to Me?

21 – 42 T.Y. Okosun, Political Flip-flopping, Political Responsibility, Current Governance, and the Disenfranchised.

43 – 54 Hal Pepinsky, Resolving the Paradox of Holding People Responsible.

55 – 66 Kendra A. Hollern, Dying with Dignity: Where is the Compassion in Compassionate Release Programs?

67 – 82 Sabiha Shala & Gjylbehare Muharti, Who is Responsible for Ethical Legal Education, for what and to whom? Case of Kosovo.

83 Acknowledgments.


Examining The Role Of Law Of War Training In International Criminal Accountability, Laurie R. Blank Aug 2017

Examining The Role Of Law Of War Training In International Criminal Accountability, Laurie R. Blank

Utah Law Review

Training and dissemination of the fundamental rules and principles of law of armed conflict (LOAC) is the first step in any process to ensure lawful military operations. A soldier, a military unit, an entire military must know the rules and parameters for appropriate, lawful and effective action during armed conflict. In the same manner, accountability for violations of LOAC — whether individual criminal accountability or state responsibility — is an equally essential tool for enforcing the law. Exploring the intersection between these two endpoints of the spectrum of LOAC implementation highlights how training and accountability can actually work together to maximize each ...


Washington University School Of Law’S Global Trajectory, Leila Nadya Sadat Jan 2017

Washington University School Of Law’S Global Trajectory, Leila Nadya Sadat

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This Essay discusses the changing nature of legal education, focusing on the movement from national to global law schools, specifically within the context of globalization. Sadat details the development of international and comparative legal education at Washington University and reflects on their benefit to the School’s reputation. Sadat closes with a discussion of “Global Trumpism,” its potential impact on the Pax Americana, and the resulting effect on Washington University’s international and comparative legal education programs.


The Role Of A Law School Dean: Balancing A Variety Of Roles And Interests. The American University Washington College Of Law Experience, Claudio Grossman Nov 2016

The Role Of A Law School Dean: Balancing A Variety Of Roles And Interests. The American University Washington College Of Law Experience, Claudio Grossman

Claudio M. Grossman

No abstract provided.


Access To Justice In Latin America: A Changing Legal Landscape, Joan Vermeulen Jul 2016

Access To Justice In Latin America: A Changing Legal Landscape, Joan Vermeulen

Impact Center for Public Interest Law

No abstract provided.


The Teaching Of International Law, Myres S. Mcdougal Apr 2016

The Teaching Of International Law, Myres S. Mcdougal

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Teaching Of International Law, Edward Mcwhinney Apr 2016

The Teaching Of International Law, Edward Mcwhinney

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Teaching Of International Law, Ian Brownlie Apr 2016

The Teaching Of International Law, Ian Brownlie

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


The Teaching Of International Law, Kenneth R. Simmonds Apr 2016

The Teaching Of International Law, Kenneth R. Simmonds

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Introductory Statement, Rosalyn Higgins Apr 2016

Introductory Statement, Rosalyn Higgins

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Editors' Foreword, Editors Apr 2016

Editors' Foreword, Editors

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Foreword, Stephen M. Schwebel Apr 2016

Foreword, Stephen M. Schwebel

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Dichotomy No Longer? The Role Of The Private Business Sector In Educating The Future Russian Legal Professions, Philip M. Genty Mar 2016

Dichotomy No Longer? The Role Of The Private Business Sector In Educating The Future Russian Legal Professions, Philip M. Genty

Fordham Urban Law Journal

No abstract provided.


How Cosmopolitan Are International Law Professors?, Ryan Scoville, Milan Markovic Jan 2016

How Cosmopolitan Are International Law Professors?, Ryan Scoville, Milan Markovic

Faculty Scholarship

This Article offers an empirical answer to a question of interest among scholars of comparative international law: why do American views about international law appear at times to differ from those of other countries? The authors contend that part of the answer lies in legal education. Conducting a survey of the educational and professional backgrounds of nearly 150 legal academics, the authors reveal evidence that professors of international law in the United States often lack significant foreign legal experience, particularly outside of the West. Sociological research suggests that this tendency leads professors to teach international law from predominantly nationalistic and ...


The Michigan Guidelines On Risk For Reasons Of Political Opinion, James C. Hathaway Jan 2016

The Michigan Guidelines On Risk For Reasons Of Political Opinion, James C. Hathaway

Michigan Journal of International Law

The Convention relating to the Status of Refugees (“Convention”) recognizes as refugees those who, owing to a well-founded fear of being persecuted on the basis of inter alia “political opinion,” are unable or unwilling to avail themselves of the protection of their home country


Toward A New Framework For Understanding Political Opinion, Catherine Dauvergne Jan 2016

Toward A New Framework For Understanding Political Opinion, Catherine Dauvergne

Michigan Journal of International Law

This paper was written to frame the work of the Seventh Colloquium on Challenges in International Refugee Law, held at the University of Michigan Faculty of Law, on March 27–29, 2015. To some extent, therefore, it has already served its purpose. It is somewhat tempting in the wake of the Colloquium to completely reconstruct the paper in light of the conversations and conclusions of that event. Such reconstruction, however, would be misleading. Instead, I have chosen to publish the paper in a form that is very similar to its earlier iteration, with a few corrections, clarifications, and explanatory notes ...


Special Feature Seventh Colloquium On Challenges In International Refugee Law, James C. Hathaway Jan 2016

Special Feature Seventh Colloquium On Challenges In International Refugee Law, James C. Hathaway

Michigan Journal of International Law

Refugee status at international law requires more than demonstration of a risk of being persecuted. Unless the risk faced by an applicant is causally connected to one of five specified attributes – his or her race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group, or political opinion – the claim to be a refugee must fail. Because the drafters of the Refugee Convention believed that the world’s asylum capacity was insufficient to accommodate all those at risk of being persecuted, they opted to confine the class of refugees to persons whose predicament stems from who they are, or what they believe ...


How Cosmopolitan Are International Law Professors?, Ryan Scoville, Milan Markovic Jan 2016

How Cosmopolitan Are International Law Professors?, Ryan Scoville, Milan Markovic

Michigan Journal of International Law

This Article offers an empirical answer to a question of interest among scholars of comparative international law: why do American views about international law appear at times to differ from those of other countries? We contend that part of the answer lies in legal education. Conducting a survey of the educational and professional backgrounds of nearly 150 legal academics, we reveal evidence that professors of international law in the United States often lack significant foreign legal experience, particularly outside of the West. Sociological research suggests that this tendency leads professors to teach international law from predominantly nationalistic and Western perspectives ...


Gandhi’S Prophecy: Corporate Violence And A Mindful Law For Bhopal, Nehal A. Patel Nov 2015

Gandhi’S Prophecy: Corporate Violence And A Mindful Law For Bhopal, Nehal A. Patel

Nehal A. Patel

Abstract
Over thirty years have passed since the Bhopal chemical disaster began,
and in that time scholars of corporate social responsibility (CSR) have
discussed and debated several frameworks for improving corporate response
to social and environmental problems. However, CSR discourse rarely
delves into the fundamental architecture of legal thought that often
buttresses corporate dominance in the global economy. Moreover, CSR
discourse does little to challenge the ontological and epistemological
assumptions that form the foundation for modern economics and the role of
corporations in the world.
I explore methods of transforming CSR by employing the thought of
Mohandas Gandhi. I pay ...


Globalism From An African Perspective: The Training Of Lawyers For A New And Challenging Reality, Winston P. Nagan, Marcio Santos Aug 2015

Globalism From An African Perspective: The Training Of Lawyers For A New And Challenging Reality, Winston P. Nagan, Marcio Santos

Winston P Nagan

This paper deals with the definition and implications of globalism generally and for African interests in particular. Its focus is on globalism as a cluster of social, economic, and political forces contesting for the controlling paradigm of international relations and international law. The article underscores the general issue of globalism's impact on the well-being of the international community. It also considers the impact of globalism on the U.N. Charter, and, in particular, the role of the United Nations in international economic order. The connections between globalism and society are considered as part of the changing character of war ...


Vii. Legal Education In The Americas, A. An Introduction (Proceedings Of The Third Annual Legal & Policy Issues In The Americas Conference), Jon Mills Aug 2015

Vii. Legal Education In The Americas, A. An Introduction (Proceedings Of The Third Annual Legal & Policy Issues In The Americas Conference), Jon Mills

Jon L. Mills

Proceedings of the Third Annual Legal & Policy Issues in the Americas Conference (2002)


Editorial Foreword, Donald E. Wright Aug 2015

Editorial Foreword, Donald E. Wright

Akron Law Review

In recent years, much public comment has centered on the issue of delay in civil and criminal litigation. A survey of six Northeastern Ohio counties was published in 1970 under the title: ORDER IN THE COURTS. The report failed to stir active concern in the legal community because of the lack of available standards against which disposition figures could be measured.


Professional Responsibility In An Uncertain Profession: Legal Ethics In China, Judith A. Mcmorrow Jun 2015

Professional Responsibility In An Uncertain Profession: Legal Ethics In China, Judith A. Mcmorrow

Akron Law Review

d the Chinese legal profession as it develops norms of legal ethics. This essay starts with two simple questions: Why do law schools in China have so little discussion of legal ethics? Why do students not press or seek more discussion of this topic? The essay then looks at the creation of norms of legal ethics from a topdown perspective and the inadequacy of that approach. Both a bottomup and top-down examination identify the tremendous challenges facing the Chinese emerging legal culture in building a coherent model of lawyering that can serve as the foundation for a system of legal ...


Is The Albert H Kritzer Database Telling Us More Than We Know?, Thomas Neumann May 2015

Is The Albert H Kritzer Database Telling Us More Than We Know?, Thomas Neumann

Pace International Law Review

This article is the first in a series of articles attempting to provide a geographical and temporal overview of the application practice of the United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG). In this first article, the success of CISG is explored. The article develops the idea of using the Albert H. Kritzer Database to achieve an overview of the success of the Convention in practice. It is argued that the success of the Convention is useful to measure by its uniformity in practice, and therefore a set of criteria relating to the Convention’s application ...


Mexican Law And Legal Research, Julienne Grant, Jonathan Pratter, Bianca Anderson, Marisol Floren-Romero, Jootaek Lee, Lyonette Louis-Jacques, Teresa Miguel-Stearns, Sergio Stone Feb 2015

Mexican Law And Legal Research, Julienne Grant, Jonathan Pratter, Bianca Anderson, Marisol Floren-Romero, Jootaek Lee, Lyonette Louis-Jacques, Teresa Miguel-Stearns, Sergio Stone

Jootaek Lee

No abstract provided.


What Internationals Know: Improving The Effectiveness Of Post-Conflict Justice Initiatives, Elena Baylis Jan 2015

What Internationals Know: Improving The Effectiveness Of Post-Conflict Justice Initiatives, Elena Baylis

Washington University Global Studies Law Review

The international community is intensely involved in the field of post-conflict justice. The United States, the United Nations, and many other international organizations, governments, and institutions have contributed to hundreds of trials and programs aimed at achieving post-conflict justice goals.Through these initiatives, the field of post-conflict justice has developed rapidly over the last thirty years.

This Article contributes to the literature on the effectiveness of post conflict justice initiatives by examining the relationships between internationals’ job movement and their development and transfer of knowledge from one post-conflict setting and institution to another. During interviews with internationals, I observed differences ...


Immigrant Lawyers And The Changing Face Of The U.S. Legal Profession, Ethan Michelson Jan 2015

Immigrant Lawyers And The Changing Face Of The U.S. Legal Profession, Ethan Michelson

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

In this Comment, I extend Lazarus-Black and Globokar's analysis further downstream to consider the stakes for the U.S. legal profession as a whole. Gatekeepers to LL.M. programs are doing far more than determining individual fates and collectively shaping the future of U.S. legal education. I will demonstrate in this Comment that their work helps shape-in concrete, measurable ways-the demographic composition of the U.S. legal profession. In so doing, I will contribute to the emerging field of legal demography, which refers to the study of lawyers through the analysis of data not collected for this specific ...


The Aspiring And Globalizing Graduate Law Student: A Comment On The Lazarus-Black And Globokar Ll.M. Study, Jayanth K. Krishnan, Vitor M. Dias Jan 2015

The Aspiring And Globalizing Graduate Law Student: A Comment On The Lazarus-Black And Globokar Ll.M. Study, Jayanth K. Krishnan, Vitor M. Dias

Indiana Journal of Global Legal Studies

As a thought experiment, in the next section we present a theoretical frame (that builds on what previous scholars have discussed) for understanding motivation-as it relates to the subject focused on by Lazarus-Black and Globokar. Based on this model, we then postulate an alternative motivation for why foreign applicants might wish to pursue their LL.M. studies. We base our hypothesis on the experiences we have had in two countries we know well: India and Brazil. Because this is just a short Comment, we leave the empirical work on our proposal for future research. Our hope is that this exercise ...


Cross-Boarder Teaching And Collaboration, Kimberly D. Ambrose, William H.D. Fernholz, Catherine F. Klein, Dana Raigrodski, Stephen A. Rosenbaum, Leah Wortham Jan 2015

Cross-Boarder Teaching And Collaboration, Kimberly D. Ambrose, William H.D. Fernholz, Catherine F. Klein, Dana Raigrodski, Stephen A. Rosenbaum, Leah Wortham

Books and Book Chapters

Since the publication of Best Practices for Legal Education, the globalization of both legal education and law practice has exploded. Today’s lawyers increasingly serve border-crossing clients or clients who present with transnational legal issues. As law schools expand their international programs, and enroll increasing numbers of non-U.S. law students, law students transcend cultural and legal borders. As a result, they deepen their understanding of—and sharpen their critical perspective on—their own national systems. Similarly, U.S. law teachers are increasingly called to engage in border-crossing teaching and other academic pursuits. Best Practices did not address these issues ...


Legal Education As A Rule Of Law Strategy: Problems And Opportunities With U.S.-Based Programs, David Pimentel Dec 2014

Legal Education As A Rule Of Law Strategy: Problems And Opportunities With U.S.-Based Programs, David Pimentel

David Pimentel

Education can be powerful force in building the rule of law in developing countries and transitional states—especially in light of its power to influence culture and its ability to sustain meaningful change. Building a more effective system of legal education is a long term project, however, and a difficult sell given the way rule of law reform gets funded. Shorter term impacts are possible, however, through U.S.-based educational opportunities, which therefore present a compelling opportunity for rule of law promotion. Addressing short-term legal education deficiencies with U.S.-based education can contribute to a vision for the ...