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Full-Text Articles in Law and Race

Race And Higher Education: Is The Lsat Systemic Of Racial Differences In Education Attainment?, Mona E. Robbins Jan 2017

Race And Higher Education: Is The Lsat Systemic Of Racial Differences In Education Attainment?, Mona E. Robbins

Summer Program for Undergraduate Research (SPUR)

Law school is the least diverse graduate school program, which translates to the lack of diversity among law professionals. Among America’s national law schools, Caucasians fill eighty-eight percent of the seats. This persistent trend over the years has led researchers to question what barriers of entry might exist that are limiting the diversity. One of the most significant barriers has shown to be the Law School Admissions Test. The LSAT is the highest weighing component on whether an applicant will be accepted or denied from law school. Trends have also revealed that underrepresented minorities statistically have much lower scores ...


Testing, Discrimination, And Opportunity: A Reply To Professor Harvey Gilmore, Dan Subotnik May 2015

Testing, Discrimination, And Opportunity: A Reply To Professor Harvey Gilmore, Dan Subotnik

Dan Subotnik

This article was written as part of an ongoing dialog about the author’s previous article, "Does Testing = Race Discrimination?: Ricci, The Bar Exam, the LSAT, and the Challenge to Learning," which defended the Supreme Court’s decision in Ricci v. DeStefano, as well as defending testing more generally against charges of irrelevance, racial obtuseness, and most seriously, race discrimination. This article specifically responds to an article written by Professor Harvey Gilmore which focuses mostly on the SAT and the LSAT.


Testing, Discrimination, And Opportunity: A Reply To Professor Harvey Gilmore, Dan Subotnik Jan 2014

Testing, Discrimination, And Opportunity: A Reply To Professor Harvey Gilmore, Dan Subotnik

Scholarly Works

This article was written as part of an ongoing dialog about the author’s previous article, "Does Testing = Race Discrimination?: Ricci, The Bar Exam, the LSAT, and the Challenge to Learning," which defended the Supreme Court’s decision in Ricci v. DeStefano, as well as defending testing more generally against charges of irrelevance, racial obtuseness, and most seriously, race discrimination.

This article specifically responds to an article written by Professor Harvey Gilmore which focuses mostly on the SAT and the LSAT.


When "Victory" Masks Retreat: The Lsat, Constitutional Dualism, And The End Of Diversity, D. Marvin Jones Jan 2006

When "Victory" Masks Retreat: The Lsat, Constitutional Dualism, And The End Of Diversity, D. Marvin Jones

Articles

No abstract provided.


A Brief History Of Chicana/O School Segregation: One Rationale For Affirmative Action, Margaret E. Montoya Jan 2002

A Brief History Of Chicana/O School Segregation: One Rationale For Affirmative Action, Margaret E. Montoya

Faculty Scholarship

This article uses Critical Race Theory methodologies, such as autobiographical narratives, and analytical approaches, such as revising the history of the civil rights struggle, especially as it applies to the Chicano-Latino communities. This paper represents a student-faculty collaboration in that the students organized the conference at which some of this analysis was first proposed. This was the conference at which now Justice Sonia Sotomayor made her now iconic comments about being a "wise Latina." People can't get to be judges without first going to law school, and Latinas/as can't get to law school, at least in significant ...


Race, Class, Caste…? Rethinking Affirmative Action, Clark D. Cunningham, N.R. Madhava Menon Mar 1999

Race, Class, Caste…? Rethinking Affirmative Action, Clark D. Cunningham, N.R. Madhava Menon

Michigan Law Review

Many who oppose affirmative action programs in the United States because they use "racial" categories such as black, African American, or Latino, claim that equally effective and more equitable programs can be developed using only class categories, such as "low income." A key test case for the "race v. class" debate is admission to law schools, made urgent by recent legal prohibitions on the use of "race" in the admission procedures to state universities in California, Washington, and Texas. An empirical study by Linda Wightman, the former director of research for the Law School Admissions Council (LSAC), has shown that ...


Minority Preferences In Law School Admissions, Terrance Sandalow Jan 1980

Minority Preferences In Law School Admissions, Terrance Sandalow

Book Chapters

In addressing the subject of "reverse discrimination," I want to caution at the outset against permitting the use of the word "discrimination" to prejudice consideration of the subject. "Discrimination" has, in recent years, become a bad word. It tends to be used as a shorthand for "unjustifiably unequal treatment." In its original and still proper meaning, however, the word is quite neutral. Discrimination merely means differentiation. It comes from a Latin word that means "to distinguish." Accordingly, when we discriminate-i.e., when we differentiate or distinguish-among people, the propriety of our action depends upon the reasons that we have acted ...