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Incentives To Incarcerate: Corporation Involvement In Prison Labor And The Privatization Of The Prison System, Alythea S. Morrell Dec 2015

Incentives To Incarcerate: Corporation Involvement In Prison Labor And The Privatization Of The Prison System, Alythea S. Morrell

Master's Projects and Capstones

The United States has the highest incarceration rate in the entire world. The United States accounts for approximately 5% of the world’s population, yet it accounts for 25% of the world’s prisoners. Not only does the United States mercilessly incarcerate its own citizens, it disproportionately incarcerates African American and Latino men. This fact on its own is disturbing; however, when it is coupled with the fact that corporations profit from and lobby for an overly aggressive and ineffective criminal justice system, makes these statistics even more horrendous. Private prison companies such as Corrections Corporation of America and GEO ...


Embodying The Population: Five Decades Of Immigrant/Integration Policy In Sweden, Leila Brännström Oct 2015

Embodying The Population: Five Decades Of Immigrant/Integration Policy In Sweden, Leila Brännström

Leila Brännström

This article investigates the historical development and transformation of Swedish integration policy, including its predecessor immigrant policy, as a “biopolitics of the population”. “Biopolitics of the population” refers in this article to all governmental interventions targeting the population, or parts of it, with a view to producing a collective body of a particular quality and identity. Swedish integration policy is thus analyzed in order to answer questions such as: how has the population been embodied over time? How has the Swedish grammar of multiplicity and fragmentation changed? Which groups within the population have been considered to be in need of ...


Toward A Fundamental Right To Evade Law? The Rule Of Power In Shelby County And State Farm, Martha T. Mccluskey Apr 2015

Toward A Fundamental Right To Evade Law? The Rule Of Power In Shelby County And State Farm, Martha T. Mccluskey

Journal of Race, Gender, and Ethnicity

No abstract provided.


Unmistakably Clear: Human Rights, The Right To Representation, And Remedial Voting Rights Of People Of Color, Matthew H. Charity Apr 2015

Unmistakably Clear: Human Rights, The Right To Representation, And Remedial Voting Rights Of People Of Color, Matthew H. Charity

Journal of Race, Gender, and Ethnicity

No abstract provided.


Report Of The Special Rapporteur On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples On The Situation Of Indigenous Peoples In The United States Of America, S. James Anaya Jan 2015

Report Of The Special Rapporteur On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples On The Situation Of Indigenous Peoples In The United States Of America, S. James Anaya

Articles

No abstract provided.


Introduction: From Ferguson To Geneva And Back Again, Leila Nadya Sadat Jan 2015

Introduction: From Ferguson To Geneva And Back Again, Leila Nadya Sadat

Washington University Global Studies Law Review

For decades, social and physical scientists have asserted that “race” is a social construct rather than a biological reality. Conversely, skin color is objectively identifiable. Yet, the law has focused largely upon racial categories to remedy discrimination against individuals based upon their skin color or “racial” identification. While some authors continue to argue that race is “real” either from a biological or sociological perspective, and others continue to challenge its biological and legal salience, this debate has proven largely unsatisfactory to policy makers and others interested in understanding both the social construction of race and skin color and its impact ...


To Be White, Black, Or Brown? South Asian Americans And The Race-Color Distinction, Vinay Harpalani Jan 2015

To Be White, Black, Or Brown? South Asian Americans And The Race-Color Distinction, Vinay Harpalani

Washington University Global Studies Law Review

People often use race and color terminology interchangeably in common parlance. Within the United States, color terminology often dominates racial discourse due to common use of color-based racial designations such as “Black” and “White.” Color is thus often used as a synonym for race, but while the two do overlap, color is also distinct from race as colorism is from racism.

The relationship between race and color is complex: the two are intertwined, and it can be difficult to tease apart. However, one group that illuminates the distinction between the two is South Asian Americans—peoples in the United States ...


Two Stories About Skin Color And International Human Rights Advocacy, William J. Aceves Jan 2015

Two Stories About Skin Color And International Human Rights Advocacy, William J. Aceves

Washington University Global Studies Law Review

Color is an important but underdeveloped designation in international law. Color is identified as a protected category in several human rights documents, but despite its status as a protected category, there is no definition of color in these human rights documents. It is generally recognized, however, that color references skin color. In the absence of an established definition, race is often used as a proxy for color. Yet, there is growing skepticism within the human rights community about the legitimacy of using racial categories to distinguish human beings. While race and color are often used interchangeably, it is important to ...


"If You Is White, You’S Alright. . . .” Stories About Colorism In America, Kimberly Jade Norwood Jan 2015

"If You Is White, You’S Alright. . . .” Stories About Colorism In America, Kimberly Jade Norwood

Washington University Global Studies Law Review

Colorism, a term believed to be first coined in 1982 by Pulitzer Prize winner Alice Walker, was defined by her to mean the “prejudicial or preferential treatment of same-race people based solely on their color.” It is not racism although there is a clear relationship. A clear example of racism would involve a business that refuses to hire black people. Colorism would not preclude the hiring of a black person, but there would be a preference for a black person with a lighter skin tone than a darker skinned person. From this example one can see too that colorism can ...


“Fuck Your Breath”: Black Men And Youth, State Violence, And Human Rights In The 21st Century, Dr. Jeremy I. Levitt Jan 2015

“Fuck Your Breath”: Black Men And Youth, State Violence, And Human Rights In The 21st Century, Dr. Jeremy I. Levitt

Washington University Journal of Law & Policy

This essay uses personal anecdotes to confront police brutality against Black people living in the United States, assesses both human rights implications and global response mechanisms to anti-Black violence, and proposes solutions to address this pervasive problem. Dr. Levitt calls upon Black people to become stakeholders in the fight for freedom by reconstructing a number of unfortunate dualities in the United States system that put the rights of whites above those of others. In conclusion, Levitt calls for change and a halt to “systematic maltreatment of African-Americans by police agencies.”