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Full-Text Articles in Law and Race

Religiosity In Constitutions And The Status Of Minority Rights, Brandy G. Robinson Dec 2014

Religiosity In Constitutions And The Status Of Minority Rights, Brandy G. Robinson

Cultural Encounters, Conflicts, and Resolutions

Minority rights and religion have never been topics that are simultaneously considered. However, arguably, the two have relevance, especially when combined with the topic and theory of constitutionalism. Historically and traditionally, minorities have been granted certain rights and have been denied certain rights under various constitutions. These grants and denials relate to cultural differences and values, arguably relating to a culture’s understanding and interpretation of religion.

This article explores the relationship and status of minority rights as it relates to religiosity and constitutionalism. Essentially, there is a correlation between these topics and research shows where certain nations have used ...


Equality And The European Union, Elizabeth F. Defeis Sep 2014

Equality And The European Union, Elizabeth F. Defeis

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


Trafficking For Organ Removal, Anne T. Gallagher Ao Jan 2014

Trafficking For Organ Removal, Anne T. Gallagher Ao

Anne T Gallagher

No abstract provided.


An Analysis Of The Right To Education In Hurley And Moore V. Secretary Of State For Business, Innovation & Skills And Its Application In The United States, Emma Melton Jan 2014

An Analysis Of The Right To Education In Hurley And Moore V. Secretary Of State For Business, Innovation & Skills And Its Application In The United States, Emma Melton

Washington University Global Studies Law Review

In the past seventy years, the idea of education as a fundamental right has spread in democratic countries throughout the world. Multiple constitutions and international treaties have codified an inalienable right to education provided by the government. Recent litigation has highlighted a possibility that high tuition rates for universities may effectively serve as barriers to accessing higher learning and infringe upon this fundamental right to education.

This Note will address a 2011 case in the United Kingdom, Hurley and Moore v. Secretary of State for Business, Innovation & Skills, which recognized the harm of increasing higher education tuition fees to low-income ...