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Environmental racism

University of Michigan Law School

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Law and Race

Is Title Vi A Magic Bullet? Environmental Racism In The Context Of Political-Economic Processes And Imperatives, Steven A. Light, Kathryn R.L. Rand Jan 1996

Is Title Vi A Magic Bullet? Environmental Racism In The Context Of Political-Economic Processes And Imperatives, Steven A. Light, Kathryn R.L. Rand

Michigan Journal of Race and Law

This Article examines avenues of redress and pollution prevention for impoverished people of color that flow from Title VI litigation strategies within the larger context of the environmental justice movement. Environmental justice issues can serve as tools with which to question status quo distributive policymaking processes and outcomes. Specifically, this Article concerns itself with practical routes toward increasing distributive justice and democratic efficacy.


Remedies For Environmental Racism: A View From The Field, Luke W. Cole Jun 1992

Remedies For Environmental Racism: A View From The Field, Luke W. Cole

Michigan Law Review

The Michigan Law Review's recent Note, Remedying Environmental Racism, is an important and timely analysis of a civil rights law-based approach to environmental justice work - one of the first to emerge from legal academia. It correctly points out the high hurdles that toxic racism's victims must overcome to successfully pursue such a strategy. Godsil's piece will hopefully spur more academic and on-the-ground work in this nascent legal field, which I call "environmental poverty law" - that is, representing low-income communities (often, in this field, communities of color) facing environmental hazards. As a practitioner of environmental poverty law who ...


Remedying Environmental Racism, Rachel D. Godsil Nov 1991

Remedying Environmental Racism, Rachel D. Godsil

Michigan Law Review

This Note addresses the equity issues that arise in the placement of commercial hazardous waste facilities. Currently, minorities are shouldering an unequal share of the burdens of hazardous waste16 while the benefits of production that results in hazardous waste are dispersed throughout society. Studies demonstrate that poor whites are overburdened as well. While inequitable distribution of wastesites along class lines is troubling and deserving of attention, this Note focuses specifically on the burdens facing racial minorities.

This Note contends that all races should share equitably the burdens and risks of hazardous waste facilities. Part I documents the disproportionate burden of ...