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Full-Text Articles in Law and Race

Unmistakably Clear: Human Rights, The Right To Representation, And Remedial Voting Rights Of People Of Color, Matthew H. Charity Apr 2015

Unmistakably Clear: Human Rights, The Right To Representation, And Remedial Voting Rights Of People Of Color, Matthew H. Charity

Journal of Race, Gender, and Ethnicity

No abstract provided.


U.S. Police Officers Kill Primarily Because They Are Attacked, Not To Disrupt Crime, Alev Dudek Mar 2015

U.S. Police Officers Kill Primarily Because They Are Attacked, Not To Disrupt Crime, Alev Dudek

Alev Dudek

In spite of the steady decline in violent crimes, law enforcement in the U.S.A. is becoming significantly more violent. Compared to other developed countries, such as Germany or Great Britain, disproportionately more arrest-related deaths occur in the U.S. Additionally, in the treatment of suspects, a racial disparity is evident; disproportionately more black males get killed by white police officers. Political exploitation of “crime” and militarization of law enforcement are factors that contribute to the status-quo and may explain why most arrest-related killings by the police are not a result of attempting to disrupt crime, but in defense ...


"If You Is White, You’S Alright. . . .” Stories About Colorism In America, Kimberly Jade Norwood Jan 2015

"If You Is White, You’S Alright. . . .” Stories About Colorism In America, Kimberly Jade Norwood

Washington University Global Studies Law Review

Colorism, a term believed to be first coined in 1982 by Pulitzer Prize winner Alice Walker, was defined by her to mean the “prejudicial or preferential treatment of same-race people based solely on their color.” It is not racism although there is a clear relationship. A clear example of racism would involve a business that refuses to hire black people. Colorism would not preclude the hiring of a black person, but there would be a preference for a black person with a lighter skin tone than a darker skinned person. From this example one can see too that colorism can ...


To Be White, Black, Or Brown? South Asian Americans And The Race-Color Distinction, Vinay Harpalani Jan 2015

To Be White, Black, Or Brown? South Asian Americans And The Race-Color Distinction, Vinay Harpalani

Washington University Global Studies Law Review

People often use race and color terminology interchangeably in common parlance. Within the United States, color terminology often dominates racial discourse due to common use of color-based racial designations such as “Black” and “White.” Color is thus often used as a synonym for race, but while the two do overlap, color is also distinct from race as colorism is from racism.

The relationship between race and color is complex: the two are intertwined, and it can be difficult to tease apart. However, one group that illuminates the distinction between the two is South Asian Americans—peoples in the United States ...


Two Stories About Skin Color And International Human Rights Advocacy, William J. Aceves Jan 2015

Two Stories About Skin Color And International Human Rights Advocacy, William J. Aceves

Washington University Global Studies Law Review

Color is an important but underdeveloped designation in international law. Color is identified as a protected category in several human rights documents, but despite its status as a protected category, there is no definition of color in these human rights documents. It is generally recognized, however, that color references skin color. In the absence of an established definition, race is often used as a proxy for color. Yet, there is growing skepticism within the human rights community about the legitimacy of using racial categories to distinguish human beings. While race and color are often used interchangeably, it is important to ...


“Color” In The Non-Discrimination Provisions Of The Universal Declaration Of Human Rights And The Two Covenants, Stephanie Farrior Jan 2015

“Color” In The Non-Discrimination Provisions Of The Universal Declaration Of Human Rights And The Two Covenants, Stephanie Farrior

Washington University Global Studies Law Review

The United Nations Charter declares in its opening article that one of the purposes of the United Nations is to promote respect for human rights “without distinction as to” any of four grounds: race, sex, language, or religion. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (“UDHR”), adopted three years later, expands the list of prohibited grounds of discrimination and proclaims that everyone is entitled to human rights “without distinction of any kind, such as” the following: “race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status.”

Numerous international and regional human rights treaties ...