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University of Nevada, Las Vegas -- William S. Boyd School of Law

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Understanding "Depolicing": Symbiosis Theory And Critical Cultural Theory, Frank Rudy Cooper Jan 2002

Understanding "Depolicing": Symbiosis Theory And Critical Cultural Theory, Frank Rudy Cooper

Scholarly Works

Doctrinal analyses help us understand what law does. Identity theory helps us understand why law operates in certain ways. Cultural studies can help us understand that where law operates is crucial to both how it operates, and on whom.

Nancy Ehrenreich's Subordination and Symbiosis: Mechanisms of Mutual Support Between Subordinating Systems is especially valuable because her symbiosis theory expands identity theory. Ehrenreich turns our attention to the subjectivities of those who are partly subordinated but mostly privileged-those who accept their own oppression in return for the "compensation" of being able to use the law to subordinate others. Nonetheless, symbiosis ...


Executing White Masculinities: Lessons From Karla Faye Tucker, Joan W. Howarth Jan 2002

Executing White Masculinities: Lessons From Karla Faye Tucker, Joan W. Howarth

Scholarly Works

Gender is a constant struggle. Throughout our lives, we contend with multiple unstable and oppositional social constructions of gender, or hierarchies of masculinities and femininities. Knowing, or trying to know, who is male and who is female, and how men and women should act, is a major part of the structure of our identities, our societies, and our democracy. These gender questions are not separate from race or class; together for example, they shape what is expected of a poor young White man or a middle-class, African American grandmother. Racialized and class-based, gender helps to tell us who is frightening ...


The Un-Balanced Fourth Amendment: A Cultural Study Of The Drug War, Racial Profiling And Arvizu, Frank Rudy Cooper Jan 2002

The Un-Balanced Fourth Amendment: A Cultural Study Of The Drug War, Racial Profiling And Arvizu, Frank Rudy Cooper

Scholarly Works

In this Article, Professor Frank Rudy Cooper provides a cultural studies approach to the encoding and decoding of the drug war that will allow us to draw important conclusions about the effects of the drug war on the Court. In Part I of this Article, he describes how the field of cultural studies reads popular culture through the analytical tools of "encoding" and "decoding." In Part II, he analyzes why and how law enforcement has encoded the drug war as requiring increased prosecution of drug users and drug dealers. In Part III, he considers how the Court's decoding of ...


Women Defenders On Television: Representing Suspects And The Racial Politics Of Retribution, Joan W. Howarth Jan 2000

Women Defenders On Television: Representing Suspects And The Racial Politics Of Retribution, Joan W. Howarth

Scholarly Works

This Essay is about Ellenor Frutt, Annie Dornell, Joyce Davenport, and other women criminal defense attorneys of prime time television. It examines how high-stakes network television presents sympathetic stories about women working as criminal defense attorneys while simultaneously supporting the popular thirst for the harshest criminal penalties. Real women who choose to represent criminal defendants are fundamentally out of step with angry and unforgiving attitudes toward crime and criminals. Indeed, women defenders have chosen work that puts them in direct opposition to the widespread public willingness to incarcerate record numbers of Americans, often young African-American and Latino men, for longer ...


Affirmative Action And Texas’ Ten Percent Solution: Improving Diversity And Quality, David Orentlicher Jan 1998

Affirmative Action And Texas’ Ten Percent Solution: Improving Diversity And Quality, David Orentlicher

Scholarly Works

No abstract provided.


Representing Black Male Innocence, Joan W. Howarth Jan 1997

Representing Black Male Innocence, Joan W. Howarth

Scholarly Works

This Article is a case study of a California capital case. Drawing on cultural studies, the first part develops the social construction of Black male gang member, especially as that identity is understood within white imaginations. The powerful and frightening idea of a Black man who is a gang member, even gang leader, captured the imagination and moral passion of the decisionmakers in this case, recasting and reframing the evidence in furtherance of this idea. In fundamental ways, this idea or imposed identity is fundamentally inconsistent with any American concept of innocence.

The second part uses the case to investigate ...


Foreword: A New Journal Of Color In A "Colorblind" World, Frank Rudy Cooper, Jerome Mccristal Culp Jr, Lovita Tandy Jan 1995

Foreword: A New Journal Of Color In A "Colorblind" World, Frank Rudy Cooper, Jerome Mccristal Culp Jr, Lovita Tandy

Scholarly Works

In this foreword for the inaugural issue of the African-American Law & Policy Report (ALPR), Professor Frank Rudy Cooper and his colleagues present articles, which contribute to the debate that this premier issue presents: an important discussion about race that majoritarian concerns impede. The majoritarian story basically states that race is not important or race can only be examined in a "colorblind" way or that race can only be considered if we do not upset the existing power arrangements that keep African Americans and other racial groups in their place. This journal is important to ventilate those concerns because the voices ...


What Does Bakke Require Of Law Schools? The Salt Board Of Governors Statement, Howard Lesnick Jan 1979

What Does Bakke Require Of Law Schools? The Salt Board Of Governors Statement, Howard Lesnick

Statements

In 1979, Professor Lesnick wrote a statement for the Board of Governors of the Society of American Law Teachers after the Supreme Court's decision in University of California v. Bakke, 438 U.S. 265 (1978). The question addressed in the statement is: What changes (if any) in minority-admissions programs are university law schools now obligated to make to comply with the Supreme Court's decision in Bakke?