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Law and Society

2014

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Articles 1 - 30 of 62

Full-Text Articles in Law and Race

Religiosity In Constitutions And The Status Of Minority Rights, Brandy G. Robinson Dec 2014

Religiosity In Constitutions And The Status Of Minority Rights, Brandy G. Robinson

Cultural Encounters, Conflicts, and Resolutions

Minority rights and religion have never been topics that are simultaneously considered. However, arguably, the two have relevance, especially when combined with the topic and theory of constitutionalism. Historically and traditionally, minorities have been granted certain rights and have been denied certain rights under various constitutions. These grants and denials relate to cultural differences and values, arguably relating to a culture’s understanding and interpretation of religion.

This article explores the relationship and status of minority rights as it relates to religiosity and constitutionalism. Essentially, there is a correlation between these topics and research shows where certain nations have used ...


Racial Disparity In Federal Criminal Sentences, Sonja B. Starr, M. Marit Rehavi Dec 2014

Racial Disparity In Federal Criminal Sentences, Sonja B. Starr, M. Marit Rehavi

Articles

Using rich data linking federal cases from arrest through to sentencing, we find that initial case and defendant characteristics, including arrest offense and criminal history, can explain most of the large raw racial disparity in federal sentences, but significant gaps remain. Across the distribution, blacks receive sentences that are almost 10 percent longer than those of comparable whites arrested for the same crimes. Most of this disparity can be explained by prosecutors’ initial charging decisions, particularly the filing of charges carrying mandatory minimum sentences. Ceteris paribus, the odds of black arrestees facing such a charge are 1.75 times higher ...


Making The Modern Family: Interracial Intimacy And The Social Production Of Whiteness, Camille Gear Rich Nov 2014

Making The Modern Family: Interracial Intimacy And The Social Production Of Whiteness, Camille Gear Rich

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This Book Review uses Angela Onwuachi-Willig's Book, According to Our Hearts, Rhinelander v. Rhinelander and the Law of the Multiracial Family as an opportunity to explore the multiracial family's role in American society. The discussion unpacks the discussion of "interracially" explored in her book by precisely outlining the various discrimination modalities covered by her discussion of interraciality-based discrimination. The review reveals that Onwuachi-Willig explores six different types of discrimination, some of which require engagement with cutting-edge disputes in antidiscrimination theory and law. The Review teases out these various discrimination constructs and asks in a more deliberate fashion how ...


Elective Race: Recognizing Race Discrimination In The Era Of Racial Self-Identification, Camille Gear Rich Nov 2014

Elective Race: Recognizing Race Discrimination In The Era Of Racial Self-Identification, Camille Gear Rich

University of Southern California Legal Studies Working Paper Series

This Article posits that we are in a key moment of discursive and ideological transition, an era in which the model of elective race is ascending, poised to become one of the dominant frameworks for understanding race in the United States. Because we are in a period of transition, many Americans still are wedded to fairly traditional attitudes about race. For these Americans, race is still an objective, easily ascertainable fact determined by the process of involuntary racial ascription — how one’s physical traits are racially categorized by third parties. The elective-race framework will challenge these Americans to recognize other ...


And Stay Out! The Dangers Of Using Anti-Immigrant Sentiment As A Basis For Social Policy: America Should Take Heed Of Disturbing Lessons From Great Britain's Past, Kevin C. Wilson Oct 2014

And Stay Out! The Dangers Of Using Anti-Immigrant Sentiment As A Basis For Social Policy: America Should Take Heed Of Disturbing Lessons From Great Britain's Past, Kevin C. Wilson

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


We Are Mad About The Wrong Thing, Tanya M. Washington Oct 2014

We Are Mad About The Wrong Thing, Tanya M. Washington

Tanya Monique Washington

No abstract provided.


Finding Our Voices, Teaching Our Truth: Reflections On Legal Pedagogy And Asian American Identity, Natsu Taylor Saito Oct 2014

Finding Our Voices, Teaching Our Truth: Reflections On Legal Pedagogy And Asian American Identity, Natsu Taylor Saito

Natsu Taylor Saito

No abstract provided.


Decolonization, Development, And Denial, Natsu Taylor Saito Oct 2014

Decolonization, Development, And Denial, Natsu Taylor Saito

Natsu Taylor Saito

No abstract provided.


Life And Legal Fiction: Reflections On Margaret Montoya's Máscaras, Trenzas, Y Greñas, Natsu Taylor Saito Oct 2014

Life And Legal Fiction: Reflections On Margaret Montoya's Máscaras, Trenzas, Y Greñas, Natsu Taylor Saito

Natsu Taylor Saito

This essay is based on a presentation made as part of “Un/Masking Power: The Past, Present, and Future of Marginal Identities in Legal Academia,” a symposium sponsored by the UCLA Chicana/o-Latina/o Law Review, April 5, 2013.


The Importance Of Conversation In Transitional Justice: A Study Of Land Restitution In South Africa, Bernadette Atuahene Oct 2014

The Importance Of Conversation In Transitional Justice: A Study Of Land Restitution In South Africa, Bernadette Atuahene

All Faculty Scholarship

One of the most replicated findings of the procedural justice literature is that people who receive unfavorable outcomes are more likely to believe that the process was nonetheless legitimate if they thought that it was fair. Using interviews of 150 people compensated through the South African land restitution program, this article examines whether these findings apply in the transitional justice context where it is often unclear who the winners and losers are. The question explored is: When all outcomes are unfavorable or incomplete, how do people make fairness assessments? The central observation was that the ability of respondents and land ...


Tales Of Color And Colonialism: Racial Realism And Settler Colonial Theory, Natsu T. Saito Oct 2014

Tales Of Color And Colonialism: Racial Realism And Settler Colonial Theory, Natsu T. Saito

Faculty Publications By Year

More than a half-century after the Civil Rights Era, people of color remain disproportionately impoverished and incarcerated, excluded and vulnerable. Legal remedies rooted in the Constitution’s guarantee of equal protection remain elusive. This article argues that the “racial realism” advocated by the late Professor Derrick Bell compels us to look critically at the purposes served by racial hierarchy. By stepping outside the master narrative’s depiction of the United States as a “nation of immigrants” with opportunity for all, we can recognize it as a settler state, much like Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. It could not exist without ...


Taking A Dip In The Supreme Court Clerk Pool: Gender-Based Discrepancies In Clerk Selection, John J. Szmer, Erin B. Kaheny, Robert K. Christensen Oct 2014

Taking A Dip In The Supreme Court Clerk Pool: Gender-Based Discrepancies In Clerk Selection, John J. Szmer, Erin B. Kaheny, Robert K. Christensen

Marquette Law Review

Former U.S. Supreme Court clerks are heavily recruited by select law firms, and many eventually find their way to policy “elite” positions in the government or in the legal academy. A number of former clerks have returned to the Court as litigators, and a subset has returned to the Court as Justices. We are interested in clerk selection for two reasons. First, clerks influence key aspects of the judicial process while serving in their clerkship capacity, and second, many seem to be in a good position to influence legal policy well after their clerkships have ended. With this in ...


Diversity And Supreme Court Law Clerks, Tony Mauro Oct 2014

Diversity And Supreme Court Law Clerks, Tony Mauro

Marquette Law Review

none


A Comparative Analysis Of Unconscious And Institutional Discrimination In The United States And Britain, Leland Ware Sep 2014

A Comparative Analysis Of Unconscious And Institutional Discrimination In The United States And Britain, Leland Ware

Georgia Journal of International & Comparative Law

No abstract provided.


We Want What's Ours: Learning From South Africa's Land Restitution Program (Oxford University Press), Bernadette Atuahene Jul 2014

We Want What's Ours: Learning From South Africa's Land Restitution Program (Oxford University Press), Bernadette Atuahene

All Faculty Scholarship

http://wewantwhatsours.com

Millions of people all over the world have been displaced from their homes and property. Dispossessed individuals and communities often lose more than the physical structures they live in and their material belongings, they are also denied their dignity. These are dignity takings, and land dispossessions occurring in South Africa during colonialism and apartheid are quintessential examples. There have been numerous examples of dignity takings throughout the world, but South Africa stands apart because of its unique remedial efforts. The nation has attempted to move beyond the more common step of providing reparations (compensation for physical losses ...


Place, Not Race: Affirmative Action And The Geography Of Educational Opportunity, Sheryll Cashin Jul 2014

Place, Not Race: Affirmative Action And The Geography Of Educational Opportunity, Sheryll Cashin

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Ultimately, I argue that one important response to the demise of race-based affirmative action should be to incorporate the experience of segregation into diversity strategies. A college applicant who has thrived despite exposure to poverty in his school or neighborhood deserves special consideration. Those blessed to come of age in poverty-free havens do not. I conclude that use of place, rather than race, in diversity programming will better approximate the structural disadvantages many children of color actually endure, while enhancing the possibility that we might one day move past the racial resentment that affirmative action engenders. While I propose substituting ...


"He's A Black Male … Something Is Wrong With Him!" The Role Of Race In The Stand Your Ground Debate, D. Marvin Jones Jul 2014

"He's A Black Male … Something Is Wrong With Him!" The Role Of Race In The Stand Your Ground Debate, D. Marvin Jones

University of Miami Law Review

No abstract provided.


Thinking Hard About 'Race-Neutral' Admissions, Aaron Danielson, Richard H. Sander Jul 2014

Thinking Hard About 'Race-Neutral' Admissions, Aaron Danielson, Richard H. Sander

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

Our exploration is organized as follows. In Part I, we sympathetically consider the very difficult dilemmas facing higher education leaders. Understanding the often irreconcilable pressures that constrain university administrators is essential if we are to envision the plausible policies they might undertake. In Part II, we draw on a range of data to illustrate some of the “properties” of admissions systems and, in particular, the ways in which race, SES, and academic preparation interact dynamically both within individual schools and across the educational spectrum. Partly because the questions we examine here have been so little studied, ideal data does not ...


Competitive Federalism: Five Clarifying Questions, Larry Yackle Jul 2014

Competitive Federalism: Five Clarifying Questions, Larry Yackle

Faculty Scholarship

Before I looked into the two fine books we are reviewing here,1 I would have said that arguments from federalism are typically fraudulent, neither more nor less than deliberate attempts to cloud the discussion of real issues. Now that I have read what Sotirios A. Barber and Michael S. Greve have written, I am largely confirmed in my prejudices. But my suspicions about federalism contentions have been shaken a bit – enough to ask some questions of Professor Greve, whose answers might persuade me that there is some good in this federalism business, after all. I doubt it, but I ...


Changing The Wind: Notes Toward A Demosprudence Of Law And Social Movements, Lani Guinier, Gerald Torres Jun 2014

Changing The Wind: Notes Toward A Demosprudence Of Law And Social Movements, Lani Guinier, Gerald Torres

Cornell Law Faculty Publications

This essay was influenced by a class on Law and Social Movements that Professors Guinier and Torres taught at the Yale Law School in 2011. This essay was also informed by numerous conversations with Bruce Ackerman regarding his book that is under review in this Symposium. While we are in fundamental agreement with Professor Ackerman’s project, as well as the claims he makes as to the new constitutional canon, we supplement his analysis with the overlooked impact of the lawmaking potential of social movements. In particular, we focus on those social movements that were critical to the legal changes ...


Building Social Capital Through Place-Based Lawmaking: Case Studies Of Two Afro-Caribbean Communities In Miami—The West Grove And Little Haiti, Matthew Fowler May 2014

Building Social Capital Through Place-Based Lawmaking: Case Studies Of Two Afro-Caribbean Communities In Miami—The West Grove And Little Haiti, Matthew Fowler

University of Miami Inter-American Law Review

No abstract provided.


Retaining Color, Veronica Root Apr 2014

Retaining Color, Veronica Root

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

It is no secret that large law firms are struggling in their efforts to retain attorneys of color. This is despite two decades of aggressive tracking of demographic rates, mandates from clients to improve demographic diversity, and the implementation of a variety of diversity efforts within large law firms. In part, law firm retention efforts are stymied by the reality that elite, large law firms require some level of attrition to function properly under the predominant business model. This reality, however, does not explain why firms have so much difficulty retaining attorneys of color — in particular black and Hispanic attorneys ...


Property, Law, And Race: Modes Of Abstraction, Brenna Bhandar Mar 2014

Property, Law, And Race: Modes Of Abstraction, Brenna Bhandar

UC Irvine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Hargrave’S Nightmare And Taney’S Dream, Michael Meranze Mar 2014

Hargrave’S Nightmare And Taney’S Dream, Michael Meranze

UC Irvine Law Review

No abstract provided.


It's Critical: Legal Participatory Action Research, Emily M.S. Houh, Kristin Kalsen Jan 2014

It's Critical: Legal Participatory Action Research, Emily M.S. Houh, Kristin Kalsen

Michigan Journal of Race and Law

This Article introduces a method of research that we term “legal participatory action research” or “legal PAR” as a way for legal scholars and activists to put various strands of critical legal theory into practice. Specifically, through the lens of legal PAR, this Article contributes to a rapidly developing legal literature on the “fringe economy” that comprises “alternative lending services” and products, including but not limited to pawnshops, check cashers, payday lenders, direct deposit loans, (tax) refund anticipation loans, and car title loans. As importantly, this article also contributes to the related fields of critical race theory, feminist legal theory ...


Introduction To The Workplace Constitution From The New Deal To The New Right, Sophia Z. Lee Jan 2014

Introduction To The Workplace Constitution From The New Deal To The New Right, Sophia Z. Lee

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

Today, most American workers do not have constitutional rights on the job. As The Workplace Constitution shows, this outcome was far from inevitable. Instead, American workers have a long history of fighting for such rights. Beginning in the 1930s, civil rights advocates sought constitutional protections against racial discrimination by employers and unions. At the same time, a conservative right-to-work movement argued that the Constitution protected workers from having to join or support unions. Those two movements, with their shared aim of extending constitutional protections to American workers, were a potentially powerful combination. But they sought to use those protections to ...


Reconciling Equal Protection Law In The Public And In The Family: The Role Of Racial Politics, Dorothy E. Roberts Jan 2014

Reconciling Equal Protection Law In The Public And In The Family: The Role Of Racial Politics, Dorothy E. Roberts

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

In Constitutional Colorblindness and the Family, Katie Eyer brings to our attention an intriguing contradiction in the Supreme Court's equal protection jurisprudence. Far from ending race‐based family law rules with its 1967 decision, Loving v. Virginia, the Court has ignored lower courts' decisions approving official uses of race in foster care, adoption, and custody decisions in the last half century. Thus, as Eyer observes, “during the same time that the Supreme Court has increasingly proclaimed the need to strictly scrutinize all government uses of race, family law has remained a bastion of racial permissiveness.”

Scholars who oppose race ...


The 'Compelling Government Interest' In School Diversity: Rebuilding The Case For An Affirmative Government Role, Philip Tegeler Jan 2014

The 'Compelling Government Interest' In School Diversity: Rebuilding The Case For An Affirmative Government Role, Philip Tegeler

University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform

How far does Justice Kennedy’s “moral and ethical obligation” to avoid racial isolation extend? Does the obligation flow primarily from Supreme Court case law, does it derive from an evolving consensus in the social sciences, or does it also have a statutory basis in Title VI and other federal law? In addition to its value as a justification for non-individualized, race-conscious remedial efforts by state and local governments, does the compelling interest identified in Parents Involved also suggest an affirmative duty on the part of the federal government? And if so, how far does this affirmative duty extend, and ...


Will The South Rise Again And, If So, In What Form?: Lessons From Latcrit About Resisting The Fear Of Cultural Understanding, 47 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1211 (2014), Angela Mae Kupenda Jan 2014

Will The South Rise Again And, If So, In What Form?: Lessons From Latcrit About Resisting The Fear Of Cultural Understanding, 47 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1211 (2014), Angela Mae Kupenda

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.


Rethinking Resistance: Reflections On The Cultural Lives Of Property, Collective Identity, And Intellectual Property, 47 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1349 (2014), Caroline Joan Picart Jan 2014

Rethinking Resistance: Reflections On The Cultural Lives Of Property, Collective Identity, And Intellectual Property, 47 J. Marshall L. Rev. 1349 (2014), Caroline Joan Picart

The John Marshall Law Review

No abstract provided.