Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Jurisprudence Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Judicial process

Discipline
Institution
Publication Year
Publication
Publication Type

Articles 1 - 30 of 33

Full-Text Articles in Jurisprudence

Just Listening: The Equal Hearing Principle And The Moral Life Of Judges, Barry Sullivan Jun 2019

Just Listening: The Equal Hearing Principle And The Moral Life Of Judges, Barry Sullivan

Barry Sullivan

No abstract provided.


Finding Law, Stephen E. Sachs Jan 2019

Finding Law, Stephen E. Sachs

Faculty Scholarship

That the judge's task is to find the law, not to make it, was once a commonplace of our legal culture. Today, decades after Erie, the idea of a common law discovered by judges is commonly dismissed -- as a "fallacy," an "illusion," a "brooding omnipresence in the sky." That dismissive view is wrong. Expecting judges to find unwritten law is no childish fiction of the benighted past, but a real and plausible option for a modern legal system.

This Essay seeks to restore the respectability of finding law, in part by responding to two criticisms made by Erie and ...


Precedent And The Semblance Of Law, Stephen E. Sachs Jan 2018

Precedent And The Semblance Of Law, Stephen E. Sachs

Faculty Scholarship

Like its author, Randy Kozel's *Settled Versus Right* is insightful, thoughtful, and kind, deeply committed to improving the world that it sees. But despite its upbeat tone, the book paints a dark picture of current law and the current Court. It depicts a society whose judges are, in a positive sense, *lawless* -- not because they disregard the law, but because they are without law, because they have no shared law to guide them. What they do share is an institution, a Court, whose commands are generally accepted. So *Settled Versus Right* makes the best of what we've got ...


Just Listening: The Equal Hearing Principle And The Moral Life Of Judges, Barry Sullivan Jan 2016

Just Listening: The Equal Hearing Principle And The Moral Life Of Judges, Barry Sullivan

Faculty Publications & Other Works

No abstract provided.


Some Reasons Courts Have Become Active Participants In The Search For Ultimate Moral And Political Truth, George C. Christie Jan 2015

Some Reasons Courts Have Become Active Participants In The Search For Ultimate Moral And Political Truth, George C. Christie

Faculty Scholarship

This short essay was prompted by the increasing delegation to courts of the responsibility for deciding what are basically moral questions, such as in litigation involving human rights conventions, as well as the responsibility for deciding basic issues of social policy with at best only the most general guidelines to guide their exercise of judicial discretion. The essay discusses some of the reasons for this delegation of authority and briefly describes how courts have struggled to meet this obligation without transcending accepted notions governing the limits of judicial discretion.


Law Clerks And The Institutional Design Of The Federal Judiciary, Albert Yoon Oct 2014

Law Clerks And The Institutional Design Of The Federal Judiciary, Albert Yoon

Marquette Law Review

This Essay highlights the evolving institutional changes in the federal judiciary—a protracted confirmation process, higher caseload demands, and declining real salaries—in concurrence with evidence suggesting greater reliance by judges on their law clerks when writing opinions. These dynamic forces arguably undermine the integrity of the judicial process and counsel for legislative action to address judicial working conditions or for changes by judges in the hiring of law clerks.


The Logic Of Judicial Decisions - Two Items Of Greater Or Lesser Interest, Michael S. Moore, W. Barton Leach, David J. Agatstein Apr 2013

The Logic Of Judicial Decisions - Two Items Of Greater Or Lesser Interest, Michael S. Moore, W. Barton Leach, David J. Agatstein

Journal of the National Association of Administrative Law Judiciary

No abstract provided.


Social Justice And The Warren Court: A Preliminary Examination, Arthur S. Miller Feb 2013

Social Justice And The Warren Court: A Preliminary Examination, Arthur S. Miller

Pepperdine Law Review

Whether courts should attempt to advance social justice is a much debated topic in American jurisprudence. The conventional wisdom about the judicial process is to the contrary. In this article, Professor Arthur S. Miller suggests that the Supreme Court's innovative civil rights and civil liberties decisions during Chief Justice Earl Warren's tenure had the ultimate effect of helping to preserve the status quo of the social order. Its decisions, coming at a time of economic abundance, were a means of siphoning off discontent from disadvantaged groups at minimum social cost to the established order. The "activist" decisions under ...


Precedent: What It Is And What It Isn't; When Do We Kiss It And When Do We Kill It?, Ruggero J. Aldisert Jan 2013

Precedent: What It Is And What It Isn't; When Do We Kiss It And When Do We Kill It?, Ruggero J. Aldisert

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Altering Attention In Adjudication, Chris Guthrie, Jeffrey J. Rachinski, Andrew J. Wistrich Jan 2013

Altering Attention In Adjudication, Chris Guthrie, Jeffrey J. Rachinski, Andrew J. Wistrich

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

Judges decide complex cases in rapid succession but are limited by cognitive constraints. Consequently judges cannot allocate equal attention to every aspect of a case. Case outcomes might thus depend on which aspects of a case are particularly salient to the judge. Put simply, a judge focusing on one aspect of a case might reach a different outcome than a judge focusing on another. In this Article, we report the results of a series of studies exploring various ways in which directing judicial attention can shape judicial outcomes. In the first study, we show that judges impose shorter sentences when ...


The Politics Of Statutory Interpretation, Margaret H. Lemos Jan 2013

The Politics Of Statutory Interpretation, Margaret H. Lemos

Faculty Scholarship

In a new book, Reading Law: The Interpretation of Legal Texts, Justice Antonin Scalia and Bryan Garner describe and defend the textualist methodology for which Justice Scalia is famous. For Scalia and Garner, the normative appeal of textualism lies in its objectivity: by focusing on text, context, and canons of construction, textualism offers protection against ideological judging—a way to separate law from politics. Yet, as Scalia and Garner well know, textualism is widely regarded as a politically conservative methodology. The charge of conservative bias is more common than it is concrete, but it reflects the notion that textualism narrows ...


Suboptimal Social Science And Judicial Precedent, Ben Grunwald Jan 2013

Suboptimal Social Science And Judicial Precedent, Ben Grunwald

Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Bewitched By Language: Wittgenstein And The Practice Of Law, Bruce A. Markell Mar 2012

Bewitched By Language: Wittgenstein And The Practice Of Law, Bruce A. Markell

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Is There Anything To Fear In Transnationalist Development Of Law? The Australian Experience, Paul Von Nessen Mar 2012

Is There Anything To Fear In Transnationalist Development Of Law? The Australian Experience, Paul Von Nessen

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Why It Matters Whether There Is A Higher Law Or Not, Dallas Willard Feb 2012

Why It Matters Whether There Is A Higher Law Or Not, Dallas Willard

Pepperdine Law Review

No abstract provided.


Law, Higher Law, And Human Making, William S. Brewbaker Iii Feb 2012

Law, Higher Law, And Human Making, William S. Brewbaker Iii

Pepperdine Law Review

This paper is a preliminary investigation of what Christian theology might teach us about the nature of human creative activity and its relationship to judging and lawmaking. Rather than attempt to survey and synthesize multiple theological accounts of human making, it focuses on just one - Dorothy Sayers' The Mind of the Maker. The foundational analogy that drives Sayers' account of human creativity is the relation between God's creative activity and that of human beings made in his image. Sayers argues that human creative activity has a Trinitarian structure, which she identifies as Idea, Energy and Power. These three elements ...


The Japanese Constitution As Law And The Legitimacy Of The Supreme Court's Constitutional Decisions: A Response To Matsui, Craig Martin Jan 2011

The Japanese Constitution As Law And The Legitimacy Of The Supreme Court's Constitutional Decisions: A Response To Matsui, Craig Martin

Washington University Law Review

The Article focuses on the author's comments to the article of Professor Shigenori Matsui about the conservative jurisprudence of the Japanese Supreme Court. It outlines the conduct of the Japanese Supreme Court as well as the legitimacy of its constitutional decisions. It describes an approach in the application of proportionality principle in the judicial review of fundamental constitutional rights.


The Servant Of All: Humility, Humanity, And Judicial Diversity, Michael Nava Oct 2010

The Servant Of All: Humility, Humanity, And Judicial Diversity, Michael Nava

Golden Gate University Law Review

This article discusses how judicial diversity might increase qualities of humility and humanity on the bench. I close this section with two examples, the first involving two United States Supreme Court justices and the second a judge on the San Francisco Superior Court.


Judicial Independence: A Cornerstone Of Liberty: Golden Gate University School Of Law Jesse Carter Distinguished Speaker Series, Michael Traynor Oct 2010

Judicial Independence: A Cornerstone Of Liberty: Golden Gate University School Of Law Jesse Carter Distinguished Speaker Series, Michael Traynor

Golden Gate University Law Review

Constitution Day Lecture, September 18, 2006


Judicial Decision-Making And Judicial Review: The State Of The Debate, Circa 2009, Charles D. Kelso, R. Randall Kelso Jan 2010

Judicial Decision-Making And Judicial Review: The State Of The Debate, Circa 2009, Charles D. Kelso, R. Randall Kelso

West Virginia Law Review

No abstract provided.


Will Quants Rule The (Legal) World?, Edward K. Cheng Apr 2009

Will Quants Rule The (Legal) World?, Edward K. Cheng

Michigan Law Review

The quants are coming! And they are here to stay-so argues Professor Ian Ayres' in his new book, Super Crunchers, which details the brave new world of statistical prediction and how it has already begun to affect our lives. For years, academic researchers have known about the considerable and at times surprising advantages of statistical models over the considered judgments of experienced clinicians and experts. Today, these models are emerging all over the landscape. Whether the field is wine, baseball, medicine, or consumer relations, they are vying against traditional experts for control over how we make decisions. To be sure ...


"The Threes": Re-Imagining Supreme Court Decisionmaking, Tracey E. George, Chris Guthrie Jan 2008

"The Threes": Re-Imagining Supreme Court Decisionmaking, Tracey E. George, Chris Guthrie

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

In this Essay--the first in a series of essays designed to reimagine the Supreme Court--we argue that Congress should authorize the Court to adopt, in whole or part, panel decision making... With respect to the prospect of different Court outcomes, we demonstrate empirically in this Essay that the vast majority of cases decided during the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries--including "Grutter", "Roe", and "Bush v. Gore" --would have come out the same way if the Court had decided them in panels rather than as a full Court.


Due Process Traditionalism, Cass R. Sunstein Jan 2008

Due Process Traditionalism, Cass R. Sunstein

Michigan Law Review

In important cases, the Supreme Court has limited the scope of "substantive due process" by reference to tradition, but it has yet to explain why it has done so. Due process traditionalism might be defended in several distinctive ways. The most ambitious defense draws on a set of ideas associated with Edmund Burke and Friedrich Hayek, who suggested that traditions have special credentials by virtue of their acceptance by many minds. But this defense runs into three problems. Those who have participated in a tradition may not have accepted any relevant proposition; they might suffer from a systematic bias; and ...


Docketology, District Courts, And Doctrine, David A. Hoffman, Alan J. Izenman, Jeffrey R. Lidicker Jan 2007

Docketology, District Courts, And Doctrine, David A. Hoffman, Alan J. Izenman, Jeffrey R. Lidicker

Washington University Law Review

Empirical legal scholars have traditionally modeled trial court judicial opinion writing by assuming that judges act rationally, seeking to maximize their influence by writing opinions in politically important cases. To test such views, we collected data from a thousand cases in four different jurisdictions. We recorded information about every judicial action over each case’s life, ranging from the demographic characteristics, workload, and experience of the writing judge; to information about the case, including its jurisdictional basis, complexity, attorney characteristics, and motivating legal theory; to information about the individual orders themselves, including the relevant procedural posture and the winning party ...


Philosophy And Opinions, Warren Ortland Jan 2003

Philosophy And Opinions, Warren Ortland

William Mitchell Law Review

Review of Law, Pragmatism, and Democracy. By Richard A. Posner. Harvard University Press, 2003. 398 Pages. $35.00.


Deciphering Courts Of Appeals Decisions Using The U.S. Courts Of Appeals Data Base, Tracey E. George, Reginald S. Sheehan Jan 2000

Deciphering Courts Of Appeals Decisions Using The U.S. Courts Of Appeals Data Base, Tracey E. George, Reginald S. Sheehan

Vanderbilt Law School Faculty Publications

Is one circuit significantly more conservative or liberal than the others? Do circuit courts consistently avoid deciding the substance of certain appeals by concluding that the plaintiffs lack standing? Have state governments been more successful than other parties when they appeal adverse district court rulings? Do appeals courts act in a majoritarian or countermajoritarian manner with regard to elected institutions and the general public? The United States Courts of Appeals Data Base, an extensive data set of courts of appeals decisions, can address these and other questions about the circuit courts. This article describes the background, scope, and content of ...


The New Legal Process: Games People Play And The Quest For Legitimate Judicial Decision Making, Ronald J. Krotoszynski Jr. Jan 1999

The New Legal Process: Games People Play And The Quest For Legitimate Judicial Decision Making, Ronald J. Krotoszynski Jr.

Washington University Law Review

In this Article, I will argue in favor of a new legal process jurisprudence, analogizing the legitimacy of such an approach to the process theory that undergirds the legitimacy of contemporary athletics. In Part I, the Article describes the balkanization of contemporary jurisprudence into increasingly specialized sects. Part II examines the importance of process to contemporary athletic contests and explores the relationship of process to the legitimacy of the outcomes in those contests. In Part III, the Article completes the circle by arguing that the legitimizing effect of process plainly manifested in the context of athletics, whether at the little ...


Social Science "Theory" And The Legal Decision-Making Process: A Response To Professor Keith 0. Hawkins, Emory Kimbrough, Jr. Sep 1986

Social Science "Theory" And The Legal Decision-Making Process: A Response To Professor Keith 0. Hawkins, Emory Kimbrough, Jr.

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Interpretive Method In The Study Of Legal Decision-Making, John M. Thomas Sep 1986

The Interpretive Method In The Study Of Legal Decision-Making, John M. Thomas

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.


The Social Reality And Social Organization Of Natural Decision-Making, Peter K. Manning Sep 1986

The Social Reality And Social Organization Of Natural Decision-Making, Peter K. Manning

Washington and Lee Law Review

No abstract provided.