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Full-Text Articles in Jurisprudence

Demystifying Legal Reasoning: Part Ii, Larry Alexander, Emily Sherwin Feb 2015

Demystifying Legal Reasoning: Part Ii, Larry Alexander, Emily Sherwin

Emily L Sherwin

"Demystifying Legal Reasoning" defends the proposition that there are no special forms of reasoning peculiar to law. Legal decisionmakers engage in the same modes of reasoning that all actors use in deciding what to do: open-ended moral reasoning, empirical reasoning, and deduction from authoritative rules. Part II (abstracted here) addresses common law reasoning, when prior judicial decisions determine the law. Part III addresses interpretation of texts. We conclude that, in both areas, the popular view that legal decisionmakers practice special forms of reasoning are false. In Chapter 2, we propose that there are two plausible models of common law reasoning ...


The Jurisprudence Of Pleading: Rights, Rules, And Conley V. Gibson, Emily Sherwin Feb 2015

The Jurisprudence Of Pleading: Rights, Rules, And Conley V. Gibson, Emily Sherwin

Emily L Sherwin

In 1957, in the case of Conley v. Gibson, the Supreme Court announced a minimal standard for the contents of a complaint under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure and endorsed what has come to be known as 'notice' pleading. This article, prepared for a symposium on Conley, reviews the debate over pleading requirements that preceded the case. Unlike modern discussions of pleading, which focus on the level of factual specificity required in complaints, the pre-Conley debate was about the legal content of complaints - an question largely forgotten in the years following Conley.

The early twentieth century debate over pleading ...


An Essay On Private Remedies, Emily Sherwin Feb 2015

An Essay On Private Remedies, Emily Sherwin

Emily L Sherwin

No abstract provided.


Legal Taxonomy, Emily Sherwin Feb 2015

Legal Taxonomy, Emily Sherwin

Emily L Sherwin

This essay examines the ambition to taxonomize law and the different methods a legal taxonomer might employ. Three possibilities emerge. The first is a formal taxonomy that classifies legal materials according to rules of order and clarity. Formal taxonomy is primarily conventional and has no normative implications for judicial decision-making. The second possibility is a function-based taxonomy that classifies laws according to their social functions. Function-based taxonomy can influence legal decision-making indirectly, as a gatekeeping mechanism, but it does not provide decisional standards for courts. Its objective is to assist in analysis and criticism of law by providing an overview ...