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Articles 1 - 30 of 143

Full-Text Articles in Jurisprudence

Property's Edges, David A. Dana, Nadav Shoked Mar 2019

Property's Edges, David A. Dana, Nadav Shoked

Boston College Law Review

Property law thinking normally assumes that the protection afforded an owner does not vary in intensity across the owned asset. Property rights’ legal potency can differ between different assets, but not within a given asset. This Article argues that this assumption is wrong—and that when lawmakers pretend that it is not, detrimental results ensue. This Article demonstrates that, in fact, property law distinguishes the edges of an asset from its core. For good normative reasons, the law recognizes much weaker ownership rights in the edges of an asset—the areas lying close to the private property boundary line—than ...


Property, Concepts, And Functions, Eric R. Claeys Jan 2019

Property, Concepts, And Functions, Eric R. Claeys

Boston College Law Review

This article makes two suggestions for ongoing debates about property concepts. First, these debates have focused too much on concepts for ownership; they have neglected concepts that cover property rights weaker than rights of ownership but still robust enough to constitute rights in relation to ownable resources. Second, these same debates have neglected the roles that artifact functions might play in property concepts. Property rights are artifacts, and functions play crucial roles in artifacts and the concepts that represent them. The Article confirms both suggestions via a close study of one particular property concept. That concept is prominent in Anglo-American ...


Waiting For Rights: Progressive Realization And Lost Time, Katharine G. Young Jan 2019

Waiting For Rights: Progressive Realization And Lost Time, Katharine G. Young

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

The obligation of ‘progressive realization’ under the International Covenant on Economic and Social Rights is often interpreted in light of available resources - this chapter examines, instead, the variable of time. Noting that delay of rights is akin to denial of rights, Young explores the various ways in which accountability models, at the international level, have elaborated on concrete, and temporal, benchmarks. These include the minimum core, and non-retrogression doctrines, and the exercises in comparative rankings. These are important sources of accountability, especially for positive obligations. And yet with the promise of rights, law nevertheless structures the expectations of rights-holders. This ...


The Future Of Economic And Social Rights: Introduction, Katharine G. Young Jan 2019

The Future Of Economic And Social Rights: Introduction, Katharine G. Young

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

The future of economic and social rights is unlikely to resemble its past. Neglected within the human rights movement, avoided by courts, and subsumed within a conception of development in which economic growth was considered a necessary (and, by some, sufficient) condition for rights fulfillment, economic and social rights enjoyed an uncertain status in international human rights law and in the public laws of most countries. Yet today, under conditions of immense poverty, insecurity, and social distress, the rights to education, health care, housing, social security, food, water, and sanitation are increasingly at the top of the human rights agenda ...


The "Guarantee" Clause, Ryan C. Williams Dec 2018

The "Guarantee" Clause, Ryan C. Williams

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Article IV’s command that “the United States shall guarantee to every State in this Union a Republican Form of Government” stands as one of the few remaining lacunae in the judicially enforced Constitution. For well over a century, federal courts have viewed the provision — traditionally known as the Guarantee Clause but now referred to by some as the “Republican Form of Government” Clause — as a paradigmatic example of a nonjusticiable political question. In recent years, however, both the Supreme Court and lower federal courts have signaled a new willingness to reconsider this much-criticized jurisdictional barrier in an appropriate case ...


Investment Disputes Oltre Lo Stato: On Global Administrative Law, And Fair And Equitable Treatment, Sebastián López Escarcena Nov 2018

Investment Disputes Oltre Lo Stato: On Global Administrative Law, And Fair And Equitable Treatment, Sebastián López Escarcena

Boston College Law Review

Global Administrative Law is an academic project that attempts to describe the emergence of a regulatory space beyond the state and to prescribe solutions to the problems it diagnoses through certain normative principles like participation, transparency, reasoned decision-making, judicial review, accountability, proportionality, and legitimate expectations. In the case of investment treaty arbitration, the principles advanced by Global Administrative Law are akin to the constitutive elements of the fair and equitable treatment that international arbitral tribunals have identified in investor-state disputes. As classified by international law scholars, these constitutive elements of fair and equitable treatment include due process, arbitrariness, non-discrimination, vigilance ...


The Constitution To The Constitution, Mary Sarah Bilder Sep 2018

The Constitution To The Constitution, Mary Sarah Bilder

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

An overview of the reasons that the 1787 Constitution lacked the historical and legal assumptions that underlie our contemporary idea of "The Constitution." Appropriate for constitutional law courses and American history courses at the university and secondary levels.

Excerpted from essay originally published in The New England Quarterly as "The Ordeal and the Constitution" and lightly edited for coherence.


On The (De-)Fragmentation Of Statehood In Europe: Reflections On Ernst-Wolfgang Böckenförde’S Work On European Integration, Vlad F. Perju May 2018

On The (De-)Fragmentation Of Statehood In Europe: Reflections On Ernst-Wolfgang Böckenförde’S Work On European Integration, Vlad F. Perju

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

It has become a standard critique of European integration that the upward transfer of sovereignty in market-related matters leads to the fragmentation of statehood between the supranational, European level and the largely incapacitated nation-states that retain jurisdiction over social and distributive policies. My article takes up this critique in the elaborate version of one of Germany’s leading post-war constitutional theorists, Ernst-Wolfgang Böckenförde, whose approach has been influential in how German constitutionalism relates to the project of European unification. In this account, vertical integration uses law to sever economics from democratic politics, fragments the concern for the common good of ...


Double Sovereignty In Europe? A Critique Of Habermas's Defense Of The Nation-State, Vlad F. Perju Apr 2018

Double Sovereignty In Europe? A Critique Of Habermas's Defense Of The Nation-State, Vlad F. Perju

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Jürgen Habermas’s influential account of the transnationalization of democracy is typically seen as a bold attempt to articulate the political-philosophical foundations of European integration. Habermas posits an identity split between individuals as citizens of their nation states and (the same) individuals as members of the future European Union. According to the dual sovereignty thesis, nation states and the EU are co-original and co-determinate.

I challenge this conception on two grounds. First, split identity is a source of fragmentation that subverts the transnationalization of democracy. It would be irrational for EU citizens to partake in a project that empowers states ...


Blank Slates, Matthew Tokson Feb 2018

Blank Slates, Matthew Tokson

Boston College Law Review

Courts sometimes confront gaps in formal law where doctrinal sources like text, history, and precedent fail to offer guidance in resolving a particular case. When these gaps are narrow, judges can generally address them through analogical reasoning or intuition. But sometimes legal gaps are too substantial to be filled with one-off decisions, and judges are called upon to create whole legal tests without the benefit of formal guidance or constraint. Courts currently lack a theoretical framework for addressing these difficult situations. This Article analyzes these “legal blank slates” and provides a framework for addressing them. Blank slates are less common ...


A Feminist Framing Of Non-Consensual Pornography, Claire P. Donohue Feb 2018

A Feminist Framing Of Non-Consensual Pornography, Claire P. Donohue

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

No abstract provided.


The Federal Equity Power, Michael T. Morley Jan 2018

The Federal Equity Power, Michael T. Morley

Boston College Law Review

Throughout the first century and a half of our nation’s history, federal courts treated equity as a type of general law. They applied a uniform, freestanding body of principles derived from the English Court of Chancery to all equitable issues that came before them, regardless of whether a case arose under federal or state law. In 1945, in Guaranty Trust Co. v. York, the United States Supreme Court held that, notwithstanding the changes wrought by the Erie Doctrine, federal courts may continue to rely on these traditional principles of equity to determine the availability of equitable relief, such as ...


Institutional Conditions Of Contemporary Legal Thought, Paulo D. Barrozo Dec 2017

Institutional Conditions Of Contemporary Legal Thought, Paulo D. Barrozo

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

No abstract provided.


The Promotion Of Personhood Is A Principal Good Of Law, Scott T. Fitzgibbon Nov 2017

The Promotion Of Personhood Is A Principal Good Of Law, Scott T. Fitzgibbon

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

A great good promoted by a well constructed legal system is the protection and promotion of character. Many other purposes prove to be justifiable, if at all, based on their instrumentality to this good.

When guided by this thesis, jurisprudence brings the discussion of law – what law is and what law ought to be – into constant conversation with anthropology: the perennial inquiry which our species conducts into the nature of the person.


Understanding The Public Trust Doctrine Through Due Process, Michael O'Loughlin Sep 2017

Understanding The Public Trust Doctrine Through Due Process, Michael O'Loughlin

Boston College Law Review

The public trust doctrine (“PTD”) could be a powerful tool for environmental lawyers. It protects the public’s right to use and access resources by placing them in trust with the state and guiding the sovereign’s discretion in their management. Although it lies inherent in sovereignty, the law scatters it across constitutional, statutory, and common law sources, hurting its effectiveness. Understanding the public’s beneficiary interest in this public trust as a due process protected property right would help resolve these failings by placing it under the umbrella of the U.S. Constitution’s guarantee against arbitrary deprivations of ...


The Symmetry Principle, Bradley A. Areheart Sep 2017

The Symmetry Principle, Bradley A. Areheart

Boston College Law Review

Title VII provides symmetrical protection against discrimination in that both blacks and whites, and men and women may avail themselves of the law’s protections. In contrast, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act operates asymmetrically, shielding workers over the age of forty from discrimination yet offering no reciprocal protection for younger workers. Why do some antidiscrimination laws protect symmetrically while others do not? More importantly, why does this design choice matter? These are questions that scholars, courts, and legislators have generally ignored. This Article proceeds in two parts. First, it identifies symmetry as an important, yet frequently overlooked, way in ...


The Irrational Actor In The Ceo Suite: Implications For Corporate Governance, Renee M. Jones Jun 2017

The Irrational Actor In The Ceo Suite: Implications For Corporate Governance, Renee M. Jones

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

This Article challenges corporate governance theorists’ standard assumptions regarding the rationality of business leaders. It reviews scholarly research that documents the presence of irrational actors among senior corporate managers and considers the impact these executives might have on corporations and society. The Article focuses analysis on psychological literature that explores why risk-related decision-making often goes wrong.

Research shows that many individuals have a dysfunctional approach to risk that leads them to engage in self-destructive conduct. A non-trivial number of individuals with problematic personality traits work at high levels of major corporations where they have the capacity to cause significant harm ...


Rape By Malice, Kari E. Hong Jan 2017

Rape By Malice, Kari E. Hong

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

When people seek to reform rape law, the focus is on changing the actus reus—either abandoning the force element or redefining consent. This article argues that both approaches overlook a critical opportunity for reform, which is the crime’s mens rea. Knowledge, or general intent, is the most common mens rea in rape offenses. The problem with this mental state is that proving what a defendant knew is one of the hardest parts of any criminal prosecution. Although scholars have explored reckless or negligent standards, this article proposes that states adopt the mens rea of malice—a callous indifference ...


Collective Coercion, Benjamin Means, Susan S. Kuo Nov 2016

Collective Coercion, Benjamin Means, Susan S. Kuo

Boston College Law Review

When a collective-choice situation places coercive pressure on individual participants, the law’s traditional protection of individual autonomy against coercion must be reconciled with its necessary role in resolving problems of collective action. On the one hand, the law might seek to remove coercion from the equation so that individuals are free to make their own decisions. On the other hand, the law might empower a central authority to decide, thereby solving a problem of collective action in order to maximize the group’s shared interests. The tension between these two approaches creates deep uncertainty for the regulation of collective-choice ...


On What Matters In Comparative Constitutional Law: A Comment On Hirschl, Katharine G. Young Jul 2016

On What Matters In Comparative Constitutional Law: A Comment On Hirschl, Katharine G. Young

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

The field of comparative constitutional law has developed in interesting and exciting directions in recent years. This essay provides a comment on Ran Hirschl’s Comparative Matters: The Renaissance of Comparative Constitutional Law, a path-breaking example of the new methodologies that have become possible in the field. Its new boundaries, described not as comparative constitutional law, but as comparative constitutional studies, include comparative politics, political economy, and the broader social sciences. By contrast, this essay suggests that the field must remain anchored in law, in all of its complexity. This may at times suggest different answers, and indeed different questions ...


Convergences: A Prospectus For Justice In A Global Market Society, Frank J. Garcia Jul 2016

Convergences: A Prospectus For Justice In A Global Market Society, Frank J. Garcia

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

This essay identifies six key legal, economic and governance convergences in 21st century global law and policy: the deepening of the global economy, the worsening of economic inequality, the thickening of global social relationships, the unification of international economic law, the emergence of global law, and the integration of global justice concerns into our ongoing conversation about development. These convergences point towards the emergence of a global market society, with significant consequences for international economic law and its role in helping that emerging society to flourish. The essay concludes with one view of what it will mean to meet that ...


Should We Tax The Gratuitous Transfer Of Wealth?: An Introduction, James R. Repetti May 2016

Should We Tax The Gratuitous Transfer Of Wealth?: An Introduction, James R. Repetti

Boston College Law Review

The estate tax was enacted because of concerns about the impact of large concentrations of dynastic wealth on the political process. As discussed in this commentary, which reviews the Symposium articles by Paul Caron, David Joulfaian, and Jennifer Bird-Pollan, recent research by political scientists supports the legitimacy of these concerns. In addition, a significant body of studies suggests that inequality has a long-term negative impact on growth. Paul Caron observes in his article that progressivity in our tax system has been decreasing and that the estate tax was 60% or higher for fifty years (1934–1983), a rate much higher ...


Should We Tax The Gratuitous Transfer Of Wealth?: An Introduction, James R. Repetti May 2016

Should We Tax The Gratuitous Transfer Of Wealth?: An Introduction, James R. Repetti

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

The estate tax was enacted because of concerns about the impact of large concentrations of dynastic wealth on the political process. As discussed in this commentary, which reviews the Symposium articles by Paul Caron, David Joulfaian, and Jennifer Bird-Pollan, recent research by political scientists supports the legitimacy of these concerns. In addition, a significant body of studies suggests that inequality has a long-term negative impact on growth. Paul Caron observes in his article that progressivity in our tax system has been decreasing and that the estate tax was 60% or higher for fifty years (1934–1983), a rate much higher ...


The Theory And Doctrine Of Unconstitutional Constitutional Amendment In Canada, Richard Albert Jan 2016

The Theory And Doctrine Of Unconstitutional Constitutional Amendment In Canada, Richard Albert

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

It has become increasingly common for courts in constitutional democracies to invalidate constitutional amendments. Courts have enforced both written and unwritten limits on how political actors may exercise the formal amendment power. They have relied either on constitutional texts that expressly entrench provisions against formal amendment or on their own interpretation of these texts as implicitly establishing an unalterable constitutional core. Although the Supreme Court of Canada has not yet invalidated a constitutional amendment, modern case law provides the constitutional basis for the Court to declare that a future constitutional amendment violates either the text or spirit of the Constitution ...


Rights And Queues: On Distributive Contests In The Modern State, Katharine G. Young Jan 2016

Rights And Queues: On Distributive Contests In The Modern State, Katharine G. Young

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

Two legal concepts have become fundamental to questions of resource allocation in the modern state: rights and queues. As rights are increasingly recognized in areas such as housing, health care, or immigration law, so too are queues used to administer access to the goods, services, or opportunities that realize such rights, especially in conditions of scarcity. This Article is the first to analyze the concept of queues (or temporal waiting lines or lists) and their ambivalent, interdependent relation with rights. After showing the conceptual tension between rights and queues, the Article argues that queues and “queue talk” present a unique ...


Accidentally On Purpose: Intent In Disability Discrimination Law, Mark C. Weber Oct 2015

Accidentally On Purpose: Intent In Disability Discrimination Law, Mark C. Weber

Boston College Law Review

American disability discrimination laws contain few intent requirements. Yet courts frequently demand showings of intent in disability discrimination lawsuits. Intent requirements arose almost by accident: through a false statutory analogy; by repetition of obsolete judicial language; and by doctrine developed to avoid a nonexistent conflict with another law. Demanding that section 504 and Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) claimants show intent imposes a burden not found in those statutes or their interpretive regulations. This Article provides reasons not to impose intent requirements for liability or monetary relief in section 504 and ADA cases concerning reasonable accommodations. It demonstrates that no ...


Libertarianism And The Charitable Tax Subsidies, Miranda Perry Fleischer Oct 2015

Libertarianism And The Charitable Tax Subsidies, Miranda Perry Fleischer

Boston College Law Review

Despite libertarianism’s political popularity, tax scholarship is largely silent about the interaction between libertarian principles and the structure of our tax system. To fill that gap, this Article mines the nuances of libertarian theory for insights into one feature of our tax system—the charitable tax subsidies—and finds some surprising insights. Although one strand of libertarianism suggests that charitable tax subsidies are in and of themselves illegitimate, several other understandings of libertarianism see a role for the state to engage in a varying amount of redistribution or to provide varying amounts of public goods. Surprisingly, some readings even ...


Cruelty In Criminal Law: Four Conceptions, Paulo D. Barrozo Sep 2015

Cruelty In Criminal Law: Four Conceptions, Paulo D. Barrozo

Boston College Law School Faculty Papers

This Article defines four distinct conceptions of cruelty found in underdeveloped form in domestic and international criminal law sources. The definition is analytical, focusing on the types of agency, victimization, causality, and values in each conception of cruelty. But no definition of cruelty will do justice to its object until complemented by the kind of understanding practical reason provides of the implications of the phenomenon of cruelty.

No one should be neutral in relation to cruelty. Eminently, cruelty in criminal law, a human-created phenomenon, vigorously calls for responses in the form of preventive and corrective action on the part of ...


Cultural Bias In Judicial Decision Making, Masua Sagiv May 2015

Cultural Bias In Judicial Decision Making, Masua Sagiv

Boston College Journal of Law & Social Justice

This Essay describes the phenomenon of cultural bias in judicial decision making, and examines the use of testimonies and opinions of cultural experts as a way to diminish this bias. The Essay compares the legal regimes of the United States and Israel. Whereas in the United States, the general practice of using cultural experts in courts is well developed and regulated, the Israeli legal procedure has no formal method for admitting cultural expert testimony, and examples of opinions or testimonies of cultural experts in the Israeli legal system are sporadic. The Essay further argues that social science evidence is an ...


The Holmes School Of Law: A Proposal To Reform Legal Education Through Realism, Robert Rubinson Apr 2015

The Holmes School Of Law: A Proposal To Reform Legal Education Through Realism, Robert Rubinson

Boston College Journal of Law & Social Justice

This article proposes the formation of a new law school, the Holmes School of Law. The curriculum of the Holmes School would draw upon legal realism, particularly as articulated by Oliver Wendell Holmes. The proposed curriculum would focus on educating students about “law in fact”—how law is actually experienced. It rejects the idea that legal education should be about reading cases written by judges who not only bring their own biases and cultural understandings to their role, but who also ignore law as experienced, which, in the end, is what law is. This disconnect is especially troubling because virtually ...