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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Jurisprudence

The Treaty Power And American Federalism, Part Ii, Curtis A. Bradley Oct 2000

The Treaty Power And American Federalism, Part Ii, Curtis A. Bradley

Michigan Law Review

In an article published in this Review two years ago, I described and critiqued what I called the "nationalist view" of the treaty power. Under this view, the national government has the constitutional power to enter into treaties, and thereby create binding national law by virtue of the Supremacy Clause, without regard to either subject matter or federalism limitations. This view is reflected in the writings of a number of prominent foreign affairs law scholars, as well as in the American Law Institute's Restatement (Third) of Foreign Relations Law of the United States. In my article, I argued that ...


Miranda'S Fall?, Kenji Yoshino May 2000

Miranda'S Fall?, Kenji Yoshino

Michigan Law Review

If one wishes to revisit a classic, Albert Crunus's The Fall is a riskier choice than Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird, which Steven Lubet eloquently discussed last year in these pages. It is not only that Camus's work will be less familiar to legal audiences than Lee's, despite the fact that The Fall is becoming recognized through critical "revisitation" as perhaps Crunus's greatest novel. It is also that the legal protagonist of The Fall, Jean-Baptiste Clamence, does not have Atticus Finch's immediate appeal. Finch is idealistic, Clamence is existential; Finch is pious, Clamence ...


Foreword: The Question Of Process, J. Harvie Wilkinson Iii May 2000

Foreword: The Question Of Process, J. Harvie Wilkinson Iii

Michigan Law Review

Many in the legal profession have abandoned the great questions of legal process. This is too bad. How a decision is reached can be as important as what the decision is. In an increasingly diverse country with many competing visions of the good, it is critical for law to aspire to agreement on process - a task both more achievable than agreement on substance and more suited to our profession than waving the banners of ideological truth. By process, I mean the institutional routes by which we in America reach our most crucial decisions. In other words, process is our collective ...


Ending Male Privilege: Beyond The Reasonable Woman, Stephanie M. Wildman Jan 2000

Ending Male Privilege: Beyond The Reasonable Woman, Stephanie M. Wildman

Michigan Law Review

A Law of Her Own: The Reasonable Woman as a Measure of Man by Caroline A. Forell and Donna M. Matthews aspires to provide a solution for an enigmatic jurisprudential problem - the systemic failure of the legal order to recognize and to redress the injuries that women experience. Feminist scholars have agreed that, for women, the legal separation of public and private spheres often insulates from legal review behavior that harms women. But even in the so-called public sphere, women suffer harms that remain invisible and unnamed. The authors identify four legal arenas in which the "spectrum of violence and ...


International Courts And American Courts, A. Mark Weisburd Jan 2000

International Courts And American Courts, A. Mark Weisburd

Michigan Journal of International Law

This article seeks to deal systematically with a number of issues necessarily raised in any consideration of the relationships between American courts and international tribunals. The first section sets out the facts of Breard. The next discusses the scope of the obligations imposed by the Statute of the ICJ. The third section considers the constitutional questions at least implicit in Breard; in particular, it seeks to address the tantalizing question left open by Holmes in Missouri v. Holland: what is the "different way" in which "qualifications to the treaty-making power" are to be determined? The final substantive section seeks to ...