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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Jurisprudence

Not A System But An Order: Explaining The Legality Of The European Union, Michael Giudice, Keith Culver, Wil Waluchow, François Tanguay-Renaud Oct 2015

Not A System But An Order: Explaining The Legality Of The European Union, Michael Giudice, Keith Culver, Wil Waluchow, François Tanguay-Renaud

François Tanguay-Renaud

Keith Culver, Professor, UniverSud, and Micheal Guidice, Associate Professor of Philosophy, York University, explore the foundations of the legal system of the European Union.

Respondent: Wil Waluchow, McMaster University.


Why Rick Santorum Is A Menace And A Libertarian's Worst Nightmare, Eric J. Segall Oct 2014

Why Rick Santorum Is A Menace And A Libertarian's Worst Nightmare, Eric J. Segall

Eric J. Segall

No abstract provided.


The Rise Of Planning In Industrial America, 1865-1914 Dec 2011

The Rise Of Planning In Industrial America, 1865-1914

Richard Adelstein

How American firms grew very large after the Civil War, and how Americans responded to them.


Between “Metaphysics Of The Stone Age” And The “Brave New World”: H.L.A. Hart On The Law’S Assumptions About Human Nature, Péter Cserne Dec 2011

Between “Metaphysics Of The Stone Age” And The “Brave New World”: H.L.A. Hart On The Law’S Assumptions About Human Nature, Péter Cserne

Péter Cserne

This paper analyses H.L.A. Hart’s views on the epistemic character of the law’s assumptions about human behaviour, as articulated in Causation in the Law and Punishment and Responsibility. Hart suggests that the assumptions behind legal doctrines typically combine common sense factual beliefs, moral intuitions, and philosophical theories of earlier ages with sound moral principles, and empirical knowledge. An important task of legal theory is to provide a ‘rational and critical foundation’ for these doctrines. This does not only imply conceptual clarification in light of an epistemic ideal of objectivity but also involves legal theorists in ‘enlightenment ...


The Dignity, Rights, And Responsibilities Of The Jury: On The Structure Of Normative Argument, Robert P. Burns Jan 2011

The Dignity, Rights, And Responsibilities Of The Jury: On The Structure Of Normative Argument, Robert P. Burns

Faculty Working Papers

Many theorists follow an inevitably circular method in evaluating legal institutions and practices. "Considered judgments of justice" embedded in practices and institutions in which we have a high level of confidence can serve as partial evidence for the principles with which they are consistent, principles that can then have broader implications. Conversely, principles that we have good reason to embrace can serve as partial justification for institutions and practices with which they are consistent. This is the heart of Rawls' notion of "reflective equilibrium," where we "work at both ends" to justify institutions, practices, and principles. This method is applicable ...


Airing The Dirty Laundry: The Application Of The United States Sentencing Guidelines To White Collar Money Laundering Offenses, Jonathan H. Hecht Jan 1999

Airing The Dirty Laundry: The Application Of The United States Sentencing Guidelines To White Collar Money Laundering Offenses, Jonathan H. Hecht

American University Law Review

No abstract provided.


In Their Own Image: The Reframing Of The Due Process Clause By The United States Supreme Court, J. Ralph Beaird Jan 1979

In Their Own Image: The Reframing Of The Due Process Clause By The United States Supreme Court, J. Ralph Beaird

Scholarly Works

A distinguished constitutional scholar recently pointed out that "many of the important decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States are not based on law in the popular sense of that term." It is true, he noted, that "the court endeavors to identify Constitutional clauses upon which to hang its pronouncements." "[S]ome key words and phrases in the Constitution," however, "are so highly indeterminate that they cannot really qualify as law in any usual sense." Rather, he said, "they are semantic blanks--verbal vacuums that may be filled readily with any one of many possible meanings." Thus, it is ...