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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Jurisprudence

Civil Dissent By Obedience And Disobedience: Exploiting The Gap Between Official Rules And Societal Norms And Expectations, Daniel R. Correa Jan 2016

Civil Dissent By Obedience And Disobedience: Exploiting The Gap Between Official Rules And Societal Norms And Expectations, Daniel R. Correa

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Civil dissent comes in many forms, from peaceful protest to open violation of official rules. But strict obedience to official rules may also serve as a dissenting act. Professors Jessica Bulman-Pozen and David E. Pozen examine obedience as dissent in their article, Uncivil Obedience. The term “uncivil obedience” is meant to capture what Bulman-Pozen and Pozen consider the paradox expressed by “insolence toward law” through conformity to law. This inversely mirrors the paradox expressed by a civil disobedient’s fidelity to law through violation of law.

Conceptually, ‘uncivil obedience’ is best understood as a form of civil disobedience. An uncivil ...


Freedom, Legality, And The Rule Of Law, John A. Bruegger Jan 2016

Freedom, Legality, And The Rule Of Law, John A. Bruegger

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

There are numerous interactions between the rule of law and the concept of freedom. We can see this by looking at Fuller’s eight principles of legality, the positive and negative theories of liberty, coercive and empowering laws, and the formal and substantive rules of law. Adherence to the rules of formal legality promotes freedom by creating stability and predictability in the law, on which the people can then rely to plan their behaviors around the law—this is freedom under the law. Coercive laws can actually promote negative liberty by pulling people out of a Hobbesian state of nature ...


The Ontological Foundations Of The Debate Over Originalism, André Leduc Jan 2015

The Ontological Foundations Of The Debate Over Originalism, André Leduc

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Because the participants in the debate over constitutional originalism generally understand the controversy to be over a matter of the objective truth of competing interpretations of the Constitution, they do not believe that their mission is to persuade the other side. When what is at stake is a matter of objective truth, subjective opinions are of less moment.

This Article begins the long overdue transcendence of our increasingly fruitless and acrimonious debate over originalism by articulating the tacit philosophical premises that make the debate possible. It demonstrates that originalism, despite its pretensions to common sense and its disavowal of abstruse ...


The Mismeasurement Of Legal Pragmatism, Douglas Lind Jan 2012

The Mismeasurement Of Legal Pragmatism, Douglas Lind

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

No abstract provided.


Natural Justice, Lawrence B. Solum Jan 2006

Natural Justice, Lawrence B. Solum

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Justice is a natural virtue. Well-functioning humans are just, as are well-ordered human societies. Roughly, this means that in a well-ordered society, just humans internalize the laws and social norms (the nomoi)--they internalize lawfulness as a disposition that guides the way they relate to other humans. In societies that are mostly well-ordered, with isolated zones of substantial dysfunction, the nomoi are limited to those norms that are not clearly inconsistent with the function of law--to create the conditions for human flourishing. In a radically dysfunctional society, humans are thrown back on their own resources--doing the best they can in ...