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Full-Text Articles in Jurisprudence

The Moroccan Jurist Al-Khamlīshī: Can A Woman Become A Legislator (Mujtahid)?, Nayel A. Badareen Nov 2016

The Moroccan Jurist Al-Khamlīshī: Can A Woman Become A Legislator (Mujtahid)?, Nayel A. Badareen

Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Multidisciplinary Studies

The idea of deducing legal rulings in Islamic law, or ijtihād, as well as the qualifications of the person who practices ijtihād, known as the mujtahid, has been a complex issue among Muslim ʿulamāʾ for centuries. Many Muslim ʿulamāʾ and Western scholars have maintained that the gate of ijtihād was closed. The title of mujtahid was therefore impossible to attain. The Moroccan intellectual al-Khamlīshī maintains that the strenuous conditions put forth by some of the Sunni jurists to qualify an individual to become a mujtahid actually contributed to the demise of ijtihād. These qualifications, according to al-Khamlīshī, were proven to ...


Jurisprudence Between Science And The Humanities, Dan Priel Jul 2016

Jurisprudence Between Science And The Humanities, Dan Priel

Dan Priel

For a long time philosophy has been unique among the humanities for seeking closer alliance with the sciences. In this Article I examine the place of science in relation to legal positivism. I argue that, historically, legal positivism has been advanced by theorists who were also positivists in the sense the term is used in the philosophy of social science: they were committed to the idea that the explanation of social phenomena should be conducted using similar methods to those used in the natural sciences. I then argue that since around 1960 jurisprudence, and legal positivism in particular, has undergone ...


Deconstructing The Wall: The Analysis And Implications Of The 2004 International Court Of Justice Advisory Opinion On The Use Of Border Walls, Noah T. Black Mar 2016

Deconstructing The Wall: The Analysis And Implications Of The 2004 International Court Of Justice Advisory Opinion On The Use Of Border Walls, Noah T. Black

MAD-RUSH Undergraduate Research Conference

This research project looks at the various jurisprudences surrounding the 2004 ICJ Advisory Opinion on the Israeli Barrier and analyzes the arguments both in support and in opposition to the Court’s decision. It then looks at the conditions for the illegality of the Israeli Barrier that were established by the Court, analyzes them, and synthesizes a list of characteristics that can be applied to other barriers in order to determine their legality. This checklist, if you will, is then applied to other border walls in order to make a tentative conclusion about their legality and if a suit could ...


Hate Speech And Double Standards, Thomas M. Keck Jan 2016

Hate Speech And Double Standards, Thomas M. Keck

Political Science

Many European states ban the public expression of hateful speech directed at racial and religious minorities, and an increasing number do so for anti-gay speech as well. These laws have been subjected to a wide range of legal, philosophical, and empirical investigation, but this paper explores one potential cost that has not received much attention in the literature. Statutory bans on hate speech leave democratic societies with a Hobson’s choice. If those societies ban incitements of hatred against some vulnerable groups, they will inevitably face parallel demands for protection of other such groups. If they accede to those demands ...


Corporate Identity And Group Dignity, Konstantin Tretyakov Jan 2016

Corporate Identity And Group Dignity, Konstantin Tretyakov

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Every time a decision needs to be made about corporate rights, the theoretical difficulties of corporate identity and personhood have to be overcome. In this article, I analyze these problems from the perspectives of moral philosophy and law, examining how the theories of the former inform and influence legal discourse and practices (including the recent cases of Citizens United and Hobby Lobby); my main point there is that the philosophical and legal understandings of personhood are analytically distinct and should not be confused. Based on my findings, I focus upon one particular teaching about corporate identity—the real entity theory ...


Civil Dissent By Obedience And Disobedience: Exploiting The Gap Between Official Rules And Societal Norms And Expectations, Daniel R. Correa Jan 2016

Civil Dissent By Obedience And Disobedience: Exploiting The Gap Between Official Rules And Societal Norms And Expectations, Daniel R. Correa

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Civil dissent comes in many forms, from peaceful protest to open violation of official rules. But strict obedience to official rules may also serve as a dissenting act. Professors Jessica Bulman-Pozen and David E. Pozen examine obedience as dissent in their article, Uncivil Obedience. The term “uncivil obedience” is meant to capture what Bulman-Pozen and Pozen consider the paradox expressed by “insolence toward law” through conformity to law. This inversely mirrors the paradox expressed by a civil disobedient’s fidelity to law through violation of law.

Conceptually, ‘uncivil obedience’ is best understood as a form of civil disobedience. An uncivil ...


Criminal Responsibility And Causal Determinism, J. G. Moore Jan 2016

Criminal Responsibility And Causal Determinism, J. G. Moore

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

In analytical jurisprudence, determinism has long been seen as a threat to free will, and free will has been considered necessary for criminal responsibility. Accordingly, Oliver Wendell Holmes held that if an offender were hereditarily or environmentally determined to offend, then her free will would be reduced, and her responsibility for criminal acts would be correspondingly diminished. In this respect, Holmes followed his father, Dr. Holmes, a physician and man of letters. Similar theories, such as neuropsychological theories of determinism, continue to influence views on criminal responsibility, although such theories do not imply that it is physically impossible for accused ...


Mr. Peabody's Improbable Legal Intellectual History, Mark Fenster Jan 2016

Mr. Peabody's Improbable Legal Intellectual History, Mark Fenster

Buffalo Law Review

No abstract provided.


Causation, Legal History, And Legal Doctrine, Charles Barzun Jan 2016

Causation, Legal History, And Legal Doctrine, Charles Barzun

Buffalo Law Review

No abstract provided.


Writing The Social History Of Legal Doctrine, Cynthia Nicoletti Jan 2016

Writing The Social History Of Legal Doctrine, Cynthia Nicoletti

Buffalo Law Review

No abstract provided.


On Absences As Material For Intellectual Historical Study, John Henry Schlegel Jan 2016

On Absences As Material For Intellectual Historical Study, John Henry Schlegel

Buffalo Law Review

No abstract provided.


Can Law Be A Source Of Insight For Other Academic Disciplines?, Stephen M. Feldman Jan 2016

Can Law Be A Source Of Insight For Other Academic Disciplines?, Stephen M. Feldman

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Law has been a borrower but not a supplier. Law schools, in effect, have been located on one-way streets, with ideas flowing in but nothing going out. This essay is intended to begin a dialogue that could change the one-way streets between law schools and other university departments into two-way streets. I want to demonstrate that legal and jurisprudential studies can be a source of ideas for scholars in other fields. In particular, this essay argues that the legal concept of the burden of proof can illuminate disputes between theorists of modernism and postmodernism.


Kant’S Categorical Imperative And Mandatory Minimum Sentencing, Craig Turner Jan 2016

Kant’S Categorical Imperative And Mandatory Minimum Sentencing, Craig Turner

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Deterrence-based punishment systems are scattered throughout history, and exist in the American legal system today. One such method of deterrence prescribes mandatory punishments for violations of certain crimes, without regarding to underlying circumstances or an assessment of the the individual accused of such crimes. These types of sentencing requirements restrict judicial discretion and are designed to serve as an example for other would-be offenders. While perhaps justifiable under a utilitarian code of ethics, mandatory minimums are morally suspect when assessed through the lens Immanuel Kant’s Categorical Imperative.

The fundamental premise of the second formulation of Kant’s Categorical Imperative ...


Table Of Contents Jan 2016

Table Of Contents

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

No abstract provided.


Mailing Statement Jan 2016

Mailing Statement

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

No abstract provided.


Faculty List Jan 2016

Faculty List

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

No abstract provided.


Editorial Board Jan 2016

Editorial Board

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

No abstract provided.


Cruel And Unusual What? Toward A Unified Definition Of Punishment, Raff Donelson Jan 2016

Cruel And Unusual What? Toward A Unified Definition Of Punishment, Raff Donelson

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

This Article argues for an expanded understanding of legal punishment for American courts to use. Punishment, on this new view, includes all significant harm caused by state actors’ retributive intent and most significant harm that befalls someone as a result of the state seeking retribution against her. What commends this new definition is not that it tracks lexicographers’ or metaphysicians’ understandings of punishment; rather, this new definition aims to track relevant moral and political considerations. Importantly, the proposed definition results from an attempt to reason from the perspective of someone harmed by state practices, as that perspective has greater moral ...


Freedom, Legality, And The Rule Of Law, John A. Bruegger Jan 2016

Freedom, Legality, And The Rule Of Law, John A. Bruegger

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

There are numerous interactions between the rule of law and the concept of freedom. We can see this by looking at Fuller’s eight principles of legality, the positive and negative theories of liberty, coercive and empowering laws, and the formal and substantive rules of law. Adherence to the rules of formal legality promotes freedom by creating stability and predictability in the law, on which the people can then rely to plan their behaviors around the law—this is freedom under the law. Coercive laws can actually promote negative liberty by pulling people out of a Hobbesian state of nature ...


Go To Your Room, Fanduel And Draftkings: Daily Fantasy Sports, New York & Paternalism, James E. Havel Jan 2016

Go To Your Room, Fanduel And Draftkings: Daily Fantasy Sports, New York & Paternalism, James E. Havel

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

On October 4, 2015, Ethan Haskell, an employee of DraftKings, the nation’s second-largest Daily Fantasy Sports (DFS) website, won $350,000 in prize money on FanDuel, the nation’s largest DFS website. At the time, the two companies attracted attention with their seemingly incessant national advertising campaigns that blanketed the internet, television and sports-talk radio, which promised exciting entertainment and prize money resulting from playing daily fantasy leagues without season-long commitment. Haskell’s win was newsworthy, because he had access to pertinent and non-public DraftKings information that could have been used for his gain on FanDuel. This potential insider-trading ...


Is It Fair To Criminalize Possession Of Firearms By Ex-Felons?, Zack Thompson Jan 2016

Is It Fair To Criminalize Possession Of Firearms By Ex-Felons?, Zack Thompson

Washington University Jurisprudence Review

Steven Gomez was being held in the county jail when he learned that he had been acquitted of the charges against him. Upon hearing that Gomez would be released shortly, Imran Mir, a fellow inmate who had been charged with participating in an international drug conspiracy, offered Gomez $10,000 per person to kill the six witnesses who were going to testify against Mir. Gomez reported Mir’s offer to the jail guards. Eventually, the customs agent working on Mir’s case promised anonymity and protection to Gomez in return for his help in gathering evidence against Mir. Gomez then ...


Modest Retributivism, Mitchell N. Berman Jan 2016

Modest Retributivism, Mitchell N. Berman

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


Incumbent Landscapes, Disruptive Uses: Perspectives On Marijuana-Related Land Use Control, Donald J. Kochan Dec 2015

Incumbent Landscapes, Disruptive Uses: Perspectives On Marijuana-Related Land Use Control, Donald J. Kochan

Donald J. Kochan

The story behind the move toward marijuana’s legality is a story of disruptive forces to the incumbent legal and physical landscape. It affects incumbent markets, incumbent places, the incumbent regulatory structure, and the legal system in general which must mediate the battles involving the push for relaxation of illegality and adaptation to accepting new marijuana-related land uses, against efforts toward entrenchment, resilience, and resistance to that disruption.

This Article is entirely agnostic on the issue of whether we should or should not decriminalize, legalize, or otherwise increase legal tolerance for marijuana or any other drugs. Nonetheless, we must grapple ...