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Integrity And Universality: A Comment On Dworkin's Freedom's Law, Robin West Jan 1997

Integrity And Universality: A Comment On Dworkin's Freedom's Law, Robin West

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Ronald Dworkin has done more than any other constitutional lawyer, past or present, to impress upon us the importance of integrity to constitutional law, and hence to our shared public life. Far from being merely a private virtue, Dworkin has shown that integrity imposes constraints upon and provides guidance to the work of judges in constitutional cases: Every constitutional case that comes before a court must be decided by recourse to the same moral principles that have dictated results in relevant similar cases in the past. Any group or individual challenging the constitutionality of legislation which adversely affects his or ...


The Bad Man And The Good Lawyer: A Centennial Essay On Holmes's The Path Of The Law, David Luban Jan 1997

The Bad Man And The Good Lawyer: A Centennial Essay On Holmes's The Path Of The Law, David Luban

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Although Justice Holmes did not much enjoy listening to speeches (he once wondered "what makes the world throng to hear loose-fibred and coarse-grained men drool"), he had a remarkable gift for writing them. Holmes's 1920 Collected Legal Papers includes a dozen speeches and addresses, all delivered to student audiences or lawyers' associations, and there are unexpected pleasures to be found in every one. He had published all but four in a previous book of speeches, where he described them as "chance utterances of faith and doubt.., for a few friends who will care to keep them."' Among the four ...


The Armstrong Principle, The Narratives Of Takings, And Compensation Statutes, William Michael Treanor Jan 1997

The Armstrong Principle, The Narratives Of Takings, And Compensation Statutes, William Michael Treanor

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The Takings Clause of the Fifth Amendment is famous for inspiring disagreement. More than one hundred years have passed since the Supreme Court departed from the original understanding of the clause and interpreted regulations as potentially falling within its ambit. Although the passage of time has established the principle that regulations can run afoul of the Takings Clause, the Court has been unable to offer a coherent vision of when compensation is required. Academic commentators also have failed to reach agreement on the issue, offering an enormous range of solutions to the takings question. The newest field of controversy involves ...