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Georgetown University Law Center

Supreme Court of the United States

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A Hobbesian Bundle Of Lockean Sticks: The Property Rights Legacy Of Justice Scalia, J. Peter Byrne Jan 2017

A Hobbesian Bundle Of Lockean Sticks: The Property Rights Legacy Of Justice Scalia, J. Peter Byrne

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

No modern United States Supreme Court Justice has stimulated more thought and debate about the constitutional meaning of property than Antonin Scalia. This essay evaluates his efforts to change the prevailing interpretation of the Takings Clause. Scalia sought to ground it in clear rules embodying a reactionary defense of private owners’ prerogatives against environmental and land use regulation. Ultimately, Scalia aimed to authorize federal judicial oversight of state property law developments, whether through legislative or judicial innovation. In hindsight, he stands in a long tradition of conservative judges using property law as a constitutional baseline by which to restrain regulation.


Remarks By Acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal, Neal K. Katyal Jan 2011

Remarks By Acting Solicitor General Neal Katyal, Neal K. Katyal

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

Few have served the public with greater distinction than Justice John Paul Stevens. That service began with Justice Stevens's work as a naval intelligence officer during World War II, continued through his five years of service as a judge on the Seventh Circuit, and culminated with thirty-four and a half years on the United States Supreme Court. It also included a twenty-six-day stint in September 2005, during which Justice Stevens served as the Acting Chief Justice of the United States.


The Warren Court And The Concept Of A Right, David Luban Jan 1999

The Warren Court And The Concept Of A Right, David Luban

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

The Warren Court is dead. None of its Justices remain on the benchindeed, only Justice White survives-and the recent history of the Supreme Court has been in large part a history of repudiating controversial Warren Court doctrines. Public opinion likewise repudiates Warren-style judicial activism, and constitutional scholarship-which as recently as the mid- 1980s consisted in considerable measure of theoretical defenses for Warren Court-inspired methods of interpreting the Bill of Rights-has grown increasingly skeptical of expansive interpretive strategies. It is quite possible that future constitutional historians will regard the Warren era as an aberration. The Warren Court, after all, was not ...


Foreword: "Do What You Can...", Susan Low Bloch Jan 1994

Foreword: "Do What You Can...", Susan Low Bloch

Georgetown Law Faculty Publications and Other Works

"Do what you can with what you have." That's what Thurgood Marshall preached. That is how he lived. He used what he had to change the world forever.